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Herkimer Democrat. (Herkimer, N.Y.) 1877-1904, March 14, 1877, Image 1

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T H E PUBM ^KEB EVERY W E 0NS3DAT. C . C . W I T H E K S T I N B & S O J f, EDITORS ANP^ PROPRIETORS. ■ T B B M s l r ! ■ The H ebeijcgb D emoo » a * WiAb» teot *g.*^ will be charged. I’o ihqae UTing «at ot^ho a ? s * ’s 'i f e i f ‘^ ; s ‘K ' j ! s 2 - 4 ' ? A ‘s County unless paid for in advance. No paper discontinued unless ell »rra»r*fo» « e pwd. ex-, cept at the option of the publwhers. RATIOS OP ADVERTISING: Onegduaro.oneweekM.. ....... . ..... .. IX ^ O n e Buuare. tw o weeks.™ .— ....... .... i W One square, three wee^....-*— One square, pnemqnth„.,.....*—..*.. .... . “ iloo one month...... OnesHuare. tw& months..... One square,three nwraths... One s q a a r e , s ix m o n ths...... One square, one year— !WBLTEWBLTE I.INK5.INK5 H {T I MAKS A^SQtfA**.) J ^ A liberal discount will be made to those w h o ad-s-erUso by th e y e a r , for a n y amonnfthanasauare. _____ _____________ [From London Punch.] A MODEL MAIDjBlf. 'Tis not alone that she is fair, , ■ And hath a wealth of golden hair ; ’Tis not that she can play or sing. To charm.,a critic or a king ’lis not that she fe gentie, kind. And wears no chumon huge. Den^(i« rg'orwTifgh-heeled. Doofcw 32 or corset laced» To show her slenderness of wkwt} ^'£is not tfaut she can talk with easd On well nigh any theme you please? ^Tia not that she can row and ride, A n d do a dozen things beside: The reasons why I love Miss Brown Are that sh^ never wears atfrown* ^ — ____ IS her sm a ll b r o thers, i __ Jems their childish games » bore; With, pigments ne’er her Cheeks defile. Nor practices coquettish wiles; ^ Needs not a maid to pack her things. Nor plagues papa for diamond rings. On biscuits is content to luimh; Loves Shakspeare. Milton, Pope and Punch. O . CJ. & S023F, P r o p r i e t o r s . T h e Unioii a n d th® C o n s titu tio n . T E R M S . — $ 1 . 5 0 A T E A R I S a R v A K O R f O L U M l X X X T l . H E R K I M E R , ¥ E P y E S D A Y M A R C H U , 1 8 7 7 . y T T M B E E - 3 1 , A^ake^side d ^ U e r , yp.UBg M d fair, W lto^bIn^S»y W es and bine-black hair. And lips as red as any cherry. No shoe nor stocking to ^ r name. Which was b u t simple Kitty Brady— And y et a lord Rom England came Imploring her to b e his lady. She had another worshiper— The boldest boy about KiUarney, With only love to offer her, A little cabin and—the blarney. She favored him with many a glance,' Until the lord came on the tapis; She smiled on him at wake and dance. And Faddy as a king was happy. Ooh, bat then Poor Kitty And iery^fonJof i rords were eloqaentl^^ ,ble womt 'xnougnt sne— tnougn witn m e A rralu ltot folks s a y w h a t th e y w ill, - It’s mighty fine to be my lady 1” And so she wouldn’t look at Pat, In vain he watched for her and sought her. Until one evening, when ne sat Just flinging pebbles in the wat His downcast face and heavy sigh JBdCiffht have moved eveix stones to i And she passed, gayly tripping by. H is worse t h a n stony-hearted K i t t Wo pity t tony-hearth She tried to pass, I mean—as cool As any cucumber o r melon; But though in love, P a t was no fool, He sprang to meet-hit truant Helen. She wouldn’t take hisnutetretohed hand; ** A n’ is i t you. Miss Kitty B r h y ,” Says he, “ that’s get so stiff a n ' grand?— Good-morrow to ye thin, m y ladyl *' Bat Kate agra, now stop a n d spake, l£bat.tcteUinc-wkatt»«oK»«rjCfyeiii— O ris it that your eyes are wake, An’ yon can’t see me here before you ? Och, sore, alanna, you’ve no call To mnrder people for your pleasure. An’ I can’t live a t a ll a t all Without your party self, my threasure. •' T h at E nglisher has wealth, galore— . ^ A rint-roll longer than my arm; And that's your own thrue heart, my honey; ^'^ithUUn for alibis ^rty*lmno^’’ lobs,'and blushes; bashes 1 And what is little Kate to do ? She laughs and frowns, and st “ Och. Pat. I give it nn to you. Yo u ’d charm a bird from off i Well, just to save your life, ma _ An’ not because I care about yon. I ’ll think it over”—so said she— But I could live an’ thrive without y o u !” And now to toll the lord of it. No wonder if he’srather crusty. But little Kate has Irish wit. That's never suffered to grow rusty. Sure if your honor I refuse. I t ’s well for you—och 1 botheration—• When it’s yourself can pick an’ choose From all the grandeur of the nation. \ An’ I w.ouid look a holy show, Dre.stin the beantifnllest bonnet, E v e n i f aU th e flowers t h a t grow . An’ feathers, too. was stuok upoa i t ; An’ in a sthreelin’ satin gown. I ’d still be only Kittv B r a d y - Sure, thin, if I 'd the Queen’s goold crown. 'Twonldn’t make mo « raal lady.” A t first his lordship f e lt the cross, _ Being unaccustomed to reieetion. B u t thinkin g . \ I t ’s t h e girl’s own loss I” Round c o m fort in th a t wise refipiptioQ. And ere he left onr island green. . He saw a wedding a t Kiilamey, An’ drank, imgennine notheea. Snocess forever to the blarney I” —[Janet Titekey. in Temple Bar. I F I SHuDLD D I E TO-HIGHa?. M y loving Some kindly deed the icy hand had wrought; Som e g e n tle w o rd th e f ro ;en lips h a d s a id ; Errand on which the willing feet had sped. The m e m o ry of m y selSshnesa a n d prid e . M y h a s ty words, w o u ld a l l be p u t a s ide. And SO I should be lovad and mourned to-night. I f I should d ie to-nigh t. Evenihearts.eStranged would turnioiiee more to B'eoallXng o th e r d a y s r e m o r s e fully; The eyes that ehill mo with averted glance Would look upon me as of yore, perchance, A n d sofren. I n th e old f a m iliar why. F o r who c o u ld w a r w ith dum b .unconscionsol:^ ? So I might rest, forgiven of all to-night. QI liieiids, I pray to-night, K e e p n o t y o u r kisses f o r m y d e a d , cold brow ,— T h e w ay Is lonely l e t m e feel them now - - -lyof mo; U ‘ ------- HOME I S S iiD w i t h o u t A MO!EH« E H . Home is sad without a mother i Gloom and darkness hover n ear; Eyes of childhood, wet with creeping. Speak of sorrow and despair. Ei88 a e , sister 1 love me, brotherl Home is sod without a mother 1 Horn* is aa^ v ithqut ft mother 1. Mooiderizii: yonder in; tomi>« Hands we’ve often felt earewing Silken enris i a childhood’s home. K iss m e . s is ter! love m e . bro th e r l Home is sad without a mother K H o m e is s a d w ithout a m o ther! Vacant is the old arm-chair: Lips o f love a re sold a n d silent— Silent in the church-jftrd there. Kiss mo, sister, love mo. brother t Borne if i$d w ithout» mother l* H o m e -is s a d w ith o u t a m o ther ! U p th e re , i n t h e s p i r i t la n d r Father, mother, brother, eatot. Form a eirel® hand m hand. Kiss me. sister 1 Jore me, brother t Home is sad without * mother 1 M E L A g O S O l i r Hence, soar vain delight*. p W a m u i l i t i a iU lIil. i n t t . XI man were wise to »ao it. But only melftuekolrl O .sw e e tm e laaokoly! ^ . —^oSn JVefcfter. i b e J ' t h r g i e l l i r . “ I c a m e I ’ o a s k I ^ Two pretty, old-fashioned cottages standing near each other on a geofad- od tree-ehaded oonntr; roadrseparated by a Xitl^e meadow, which from the ! 8 je l l o w dandelions^ and afte r th a t w o re a rober w o v e n o f snow Hakes a s & l r an d pure as when they fell from t h e skies, u n til old win­ ter, to whom ^ « o b e ^ l o n g e d , h e a r­ in g th e re ta r n iag b ird s a s k for vio- to, g a thered it ab o u t him an d van- bed agaio. In one o f them , the larg e r, in f r o n t o f w h ich was a n e a tly k e p t .lawn, a n d a t th e b a c k , a s m a ll hot-Botxse a n d m in­ iatu r e vegetable garden, liv e d M ifes G u e rnsey an d bis m an M ike, the one an old bachelor, th e oth< Scribed h im self, ** a widd,y be to th e Iio rd t h a t s in t le oth e r, a s he de^ wid d m a o , thankEi 1 s in t Acr h e r rest,” . In th e other— R o se C o ttage they called i t, for in rose tim e i t was com4 pletely surrounded b y roses; they^ filled th e space in f r o n t a n d c lam b e red over the pstweb slnd up she sides o f the ‘ quiet, eld e rly aHrtlvf^ a mrkn«-K‘ over th e porch slnd i house— h a d lived to heaven on the very sam e they had often sonis, a n d left for new tenants. iften prayed to, loving' old' le f t R o s e C o ttage waiting! J u s t AS I h a d g o t c o m fortably s e t tied,” grnmbled Miles Guernsey, “ to be all upset agaiQl Other old t<^ men who’ll tak e th e cottage. fcJomebodyi with cats, dogs an d 'b a b i e s , T v e no d o u b t— th ree k in d s o f anim a ls I de- “ T h r u e fu r ye, boss,” said Mike* with an om inous s h a k e jof th e head. T h e r a was ip m e thing else M r .‘ G u e rnsey insisted he detested, and! th a t was an pld m aid, “ A m a n ,” he^ used to say, don’t need sm iles >and' kisses and p e t nam e s an d chiidrenj banging aronnd liim to keep him® sweet*, b n t 'a wom an'dbesV O f course^ some o f th e poor things can’t help* th e ir torloril\ State; the men don’t! propose, o r they do. a n d ru n aw ay, o r ^ tfaeir pftrenfs C a t 'u p bough, o r they' have in v a lid relations to tak e care of.^ I am very s o rry for th e m ; th e y have' my heartiest ay m p a th y ; but, all sam e, I don’t lik e ’eoq.” so when M ike cam e one love­ l y Jttm e inorniiig-'to-tetl h is m a s ter-the cottage was ren ted , a d d ing with a sly grin, “ A n sh a r e I t ’s a owld m aid and h e r m o ther.” M r. G u e rnsey said som ething o f w h ich he ought to hav e been asham e d , and which, to r th a t reason, I shan’t set d o w n ; an d %hen went on,8areasiically, “ a n d now we’ll n a v e 'a ll s o n s o f ‘sweet, c a n n ing pets,’ f suppose ; b u t i f a n y o f them come near m y premises,” fiiriously— “ I ’ll poison ’em , drow n ’em , w ring th e ir necks. JDo y o u hear, M ik e ? ” “ F a i t h , I do,” s a id M ike, grim ly. “ I ’ve lived here ten years,” resum ­ ed th e m aster, “ in peace and quiet, driven here by an old m a id in th e first place, an d it will be h a r d indeed i f Tm driven aw ay by another. W i t h a piano o r g u itar, no d o u b t ?” “ A ith e r t h a t last o r a fiddle, 8 u r ,” said M ike. “ I saw th e g a r r i l a car- ry in ' i t in yisterday* in its own Date little cofSn.” tu i shall be ol doors an d sufibcate.” \ A n y h o w , suggested M ike, “ t h e r e can’t be no babies.” “ T h a n k H e a v e n for th a t ! ” said M r. G n e m sey, ferv e n tly ; “ though J don’t know b u t w h a t th e g u i t a r is worse. Y o u can scare ’ by tb< m a n i a - th e dress t i f a clergym m an. Ti gtfilar leaned ag a in s t th e arm o f a cozy old-fashioned crim son so fa; a banging'S h e if o f books occupied one corner o f th e ro o m ; a m irror whose tarn ish e d fram e was alm o s t hidden by a pretty ornament o f autunin leaves, h u n g in th e Other. “ H i i m p h I sbe’a got some taste,” said the Qld bachelor^ It, was m e d itatin g 'a n haglorions re tr e a t when th e old m a id e n tered t h e T a ll, graceful, w ith sim p le brow n h a i r parted sim p ly over, a fran k , un- w r inaled brow, an d gath e red into a silken n e t a t th e back o f h e r b e a d ; honest, gray-blue eyes, th a t looked full a t y o u ; arched eye-brows, two shades d a r k e r th a n th e h a i r ; s m a ll, straig h t n o s e ; cheeks a little faded, b u t s till throw ing out pin k roses on occasion; lovely m o u th with t h e faint- cion d f a shadow a t th e corn­ ers, which was in s tan tly lost in a saa-' shiny sm ile. “ O u r neighbor, M r. G u e rnsey, I b e lieve?” she said in a rem a k a b ly pleasant voice. “ Yes,” replied M r. G u e rnsey, b lush­ in g violently (the idea o f i t 1 a n old bachelor, forty-five y e a rs h is last b irtb- can’x stan( ly I ' l l pull up „ .t h a t ’s all.” “ Y is, s ir,” s a id M ike, W h e n M iles G u e rnsey a n d his m a n returned from th e fishing excursion. M iss O sborne an d M iss O sborne’s m o ther, and Miss Osborne’s m aid o f all work were installed In R o s e Oot- tage, a n d sure anougfi th e first s o u n d th a t greeted t h e e a rs o f th e fisherm en were the pleasant tin k lin g o f the guitsr,^and an equally p l e ^ a o t voice singing a n old-fashioned love s o n g — not o u t o f tune, however, b u t d e c i d ^ l y in tone. ^ A n d th e very n e x t d a y a sm a ll dog, after jniffing curiously around on th e outside for a w h ile, squeezed him self n e a rly fiat, a n d craw ling u n d e r the front gate, frisked g a y ly over th e law n , a n d from th a n c e a p t o th e porch , where sat the law&’a ow n e r reading ih 0 *nflwspaper, T h e i n tr u d e r .was a bright-eyed l i t ­ tle terrier, s l ig h t l y lam e i n one o f h is iegs,«nd he proc^^ded to cap e r a b o u t th e old bachelor a s though i n h im h a recognized an aarly b u t iong loet fd e n d . “ M ike I” sh o u ted M r . G n a rnsey. “ S o r r shouted M ike ro o n i a g o a t w ith a potato i n one h a n d an d a k n ife in th e other. R e m o v e th is d o g .” “ R a m o v e it is, s o r ” said H i k e , dropping both knife a n d potaCo. B u t “ *thls dog** clearly objected, to befog removed. H e skipped nimo h ly around, b a r k in g 'a R t h e tim e in a whit Itfks P maan^r* darted under th e garden ehafrs ; g o t ^ t a n g l e d » woodbine'that was climbing to the . 1.0 U.UUWU, »uv. m ade off w ith i t ; a n d th e ” w iddy m a n ” m a k ing off with him , sUjiped on th e treacherous potato an d cam e down w ith a w h a ck. ” T b is th in g m u st be stopped a t once ?” exclaim e d M r. G u e rnsey, set­ ting hia broad-brimmed hat firmly upon his.head, a n d grasping bis cane. O u t o f b is own g a te h e m a rched in the moat dignified style, a long the p a th , through th e rose-crowded garden, to th e door o f R o se C o ttage. “ I w a n t to see y o u r m istress,” he said to th e black-eyed m a id-servant who answered ^ \ wSioh?\ asked the girl., “ W h a t ? ” retorted M r. G u e rnsey. “ O h I I th o u g h t p ’r ’a p g y o u d id n 't know th e old lad y ’s laid up w ith rheu- m a tia—g o t c o ld m o v ing. W i l l M iss Ofibotne do ?” “ A n y b o d y ,” said M iles, walkin; into-the parlor, a s she threw open thi door. E v id e n tly Miss- O sborne wai ~ roses.oses. T h e whitehite oe looped b a c k with jxtrem e ly fond o f r T h e w luslin curtains w e r ............................... sprays o f half-opened o n e s ; a vase filled w ith them stood on th e center tab le ; on th e h e a r t h la y shells from w h ich th e y peeped, a n d a vine t h a t ra n up th e window Ontoido b a d been broken pane, and sweet white ixed through a hung, heavy with over th e picture o f a handsom e yonng 2 in- th e dre ss art a clerg y a n . T h e .blng an d haviitg-U ttered this m o n o syllable, b e dropped his h a t, and pM 'fits'd s tie tb ro h g h th e crown w a ter yesterday. !i; “ iPk.J .tb f d k you: yoh’xe kind,^’ said Miss Osbofne, a litlle aniiifise in Jier voice, and a puzzled W . i m o m ent M ik e s rough tones broke in qui!!atJdPtdi^ looks, a d d spiouiing o ff t h e /• S h u t u p ; y b t f Id i o t ! ” h e Said, ifi-'a hoarse .whisper. “ iD roptbair.dog, a n d th e vMe4 -ffp :c w e i i t ; d g M S / W e ehierhas f 1 ^tw yoUr •se. i ou ca n sca re young c h ildren m a k ing faces-at them . \Y h en do e y move in M ike ?’*’ To-m orrow; S u r,” said M ike.— ‘ O c h , b u t i t 's dreadful I” “ W e ’l l go a fishing, M ike. B e ready to-m o rrow m o rning a t d a y b r e a k , and we’Jl s tay aw ay a week. I never , _ _ could bear the noise women make imao. WbilJifti he bfi^.'doiogrMr. when th e y ’re p u ttin g a house to rights, G d e T h siy''?’ I n f h e kiadfaesfa o f .^o ^ r as they call i t ; a n d i f I can ’r s tan d i t |h»arfe; yooi’xe socMUing l after we com e back, wh; stakes a n d go for good, i ir,” s a id M ik e , on account uv Miss Osborne’s cat, the tbafa uv the wurrild.” “ T h is certainly m u s t be stopped a t once,\ said M r. G u e rnsey. “ G ive m e m y b a t, M ike;” and aw ay he Went, growing, a n g r ie r and angrier a t every Step, flis lam b chops! and no m o re to be h a d u n til to-morrow—good gracious! A ^ d fourteen kittens— gracious goodhess f to say notblng^ o f the canary in a fit, p e rhaps its power o f song scared aw a y forever. H e actn a lly banged th e gate o f th e garden o f r o s e s ; b u t his anger, which was up to “ b u tter m elts” a t least, fell to “ zero” \when he. entered t h e p retty parlor. T h e re s a t th e old maifi, in a low rocking chair, id ly ew ayw g te an d fro, dressed in a loose, flowing w h ite w rapper, w ithout a raffle or a puff, with a golden-xhearted daisy in h e r h a i r , ano th e r a t h e r th ro a t, an d by h e r side stood th e lean, la n k c a t, w ith a sq u a llin g k itten h a n g ­ in g from its m o u th. “ P o o r M a ry A n a 1” she was saying ; “ but, w h ere’ oh, where a r e the o t t e r — ” when she raised h e r kin d eyes a n d m e t th e n o t a t all i r a t e gaze o f th e old bachelor. “ G lad to see you again, M r. G u e rnr sey,” she said* in h e r fran k voice, ising and. holding o u t h e r h a n d .— Mother is mneb better, thank yon,” in answ er to som e ra th e r indistinct query on th e subject. “ R u n aw ay w ith yo u r k itte”— to th e cat. “ N o t a very handsom e ca t, is she, M r. G u e rnsey ? P o o r th in g I s h e cam e to o u r door one c ruel cold nig h t last win­ ter, h a l f starved, an d with the tips o f h e r poor ears frozen off. I took h e r in, w a rm ed a n d fed her, a n d s h e would n o t go aw ay. T o tell th e tru t h , I did n ’t try very h a r d to m a k e h e r ; an d I couldn’t bare to desert her, when we cam e here, a n y more* t h a n I could W a if. H e and she,o( o d d a s i t m a y each other. >rry to say, I can’t break h e r of, o r haven’t as y e t ae, : o f -a resu lt o f h e r ea r l y vagab( in th e s t r e e t ; sh e steals.” T h e n sud­ denly noticing a qu$er expression on ’ \ o f heir listener, s h e cointinued “ W o u ld M r. G u e rhsey” - ^ © th e note ra n — “ g ive Mm. an d M iss Os­ borne th e pleasure o f b is com p a n y this C h ristm a s evening? B r o th e r R o b e rt and h ia wife have com e down from th e c ity, an d there would be a little m u sic, a little sapper, and whist,” “ W a it an d I ’l l w rite an answ er,” said Mr. Guernsey, And while Mike w a ited he began to ta l k , a g a i n . — “ S h u re y e heard news, S n r ? th e v il­ lage is fu ll u v it. T h e y say- she oughtn’t a done i t ; th a t its enconrag- iug wickedness au’ “ W h o the D ickens a r e y o n talk in g ab o u t?” asked his m a ster, tu rn in g im p a t ien t ly arou n d , p e n i n b a n d . The owld— mane Mies Osborne,. S ir,” answered M ike. “ A n d p r a y w h a t shouldn’t she. b*y«ffione?” . ’ “ T a k e n Bessie W e s t’s baby, S u r.” “ Taken Bessie W e s t’s b a b y ? Go on this m o m ent, M ike, or I ’ll b rain you with th e poker.” W e ll, you see, S u r,” M ike, thus adm o n ished, w e n t on g lib ly enough, “ y e know th a t unfortunate story about B ® sie W e s t, th e p u t t y sew in” g i r r u i r “ Yes, y e s —H e a v e n knows I do.— N o t a woman’s tongue w itbin ten miles, except one, but has wagged about it.” “ W e il, S u r, la s t nig h t she died, and she s e n t fiir th e ow ld—I m a n e M iss Osborne. F o r s h e was frighten­ ed o f th e o ther women,, th e y ’d been so hard on h e r— b a d ’tjesa to ’e m !—an ’ th e fa c e o f heir listene r, s h e co eagerly, “ I hope 8^0 hasn’t been an ­ noying p w in any way ?” S tr a ig h t into* those child-like eyes did M iles G u e rnsey look, an d say de­ liberately, “ O h , no, not a t all. I cam e to ask i f y o u — t h a t is— ” (grow­ in g a little inCohereDt), y o u r m o ther — o f course I m ean both o f you— would lik e a fresh cucum b e r o r two and some green peas,” (w ith a flash o f pride). “ I ’m ahead o f all th e neighbors.” H e m e a n t th e peas were. “ A thousand th a n k s ,” said M iss O sborne. “ J u s t nine hundred an d ninety- nine too m a n y ,” said M iles, sm iling a t h e r . “ Good day.' when be reappeared in th e s tudy, he had a daisy in his button-hole. “ M ike cam e out o f the d ining-room , where he had been soothing th e can­ ary with a crisp lettuce leaf. “ W e ll, Bur ?” said ha. “ H a i cat cai ^ after this, a n d drow n k itten s ,” q u ietly said M r. Guernsey. “ M a d i<i U ? ” M i to oolileoni^iad “ H e ’s M a d , is i t ? ” M ik e soliloquized e ’s m a d d e r n o r fifty h a tters.” Good heav e n ! w h a t m a n in his PP In t h e s t r « S t ^ i i e a # ,» “ h in t after h reak teM b ^ fc h im hom e a n d uta-Md ;bear to leaver Mm behind when w® ■ y ............................... : “ O f roourae n o V ’ fiWd H r . g M u * irreverently, don’t w ihider a t i t . Gmffl m o rning.” . . . . . . _ i S * i S s tilU I pitm straw b u sbaAog her -faeo} amd tied with a bifcof blue from whom he bad been separated by ibe tnaobinatioDS of hia father and her old maiden aunt. A il was««lm and fterene, when one uorning Mike burst in the library, ten d e r wnnS I m in t fo r y e r d inner, they’re gooA aod ,ao iiM-or may I never .p a k a a n o tf iW word— th a n fonr- iee a k itten s in th e woodshed, att* a l l sober senses,” M iles G u e rnsey asked him self, “ would h u r t a frozeU-eared c a t ? ” S u m m e r p assed aw ay, c a rry in g with h e r th e frag r a n t roses an d thousands o f o th e r beautiful flow e rs; au tu m n in richly tinted rn a tlio g g a r m e n i, g a ther­ ed the gold an d brow n and crim son leaves to h e r bosom, a n d bade th e earth farew e ll; w inter cam e, and flung dow n y snow-flakes npon 'and hung g litterin g icicles from th e roofs o f th e c o ttages a n d th e n a k e d branches o f th e trees— a n d the neighbors only had m e t a dozen tim e s. B u t in tbat- dozen times M r. G u e rnsey h a d m a n ­ aged to learn, (principally from t h e lady, a delicate, sweet-faced wo­ m a n , from whom th e d a u g h ter had inherited h e r pleasant eyes,) t h a t th e p icture o f th e handsom e young m a n fa t h e parlo r was th e p o r tr a it o f R o sa’s lover, who had died fifteeu years be­ fore iu a foreign land, w h ere he h a d gone for his h e a lth. “ R o s a was well- nigh h e a r t ' broken a t first,” s a id th e old i a d j ; b u t tim e baa softened h e r grief, and now she can sp e a k o f him a s calm ly a s she can o f th e d a r lin g little s is ter who died when she was a child.” j F ro m the sam e source h e learned th a t R o s a ’s fath e r had been A Specu­ lato r, unlucky in all his speculations, an d th a t when, his last g r e a t disap­ pointm e n t break in g his h e a rt, h e de­ p a r ted this life, there was very little left for h is wife a n d c h ildren. “ R o b ­ ert, m y only son,” said the old lady, helps us a l l h e e a n ; b u t lately he baa m a rried a sweet g irl, -who h a s pa- (tiently w a ited for h im five long years, and now R o s a an d I will have to live m o re e c o n o m ically th a n ever, i f th a t be possible, B u t, d e a r m e, bow I do run ou, a n d how R o s a would scold me i f she knew i t ! b u t you are so kind and sym p a thetic, M r. G u e rnsey, t h a t , Short as o u r acquaintance has been, I alm o s t re,:ard y o u as obe o f the fam i­ ly. Rosa, my dear, I should like Mr. G u e rnsey to b e a r t h a t new s o n g y o u r b ro th e r s e n t you last week.” ( ‘’ A n d would M r, G u e rM ey lik e to hear it?” Rosa asks. “ HoW can yon ask m e ?’’ says th e d bachelor; “ I am always pleased o ld b a c h e lo r; “ J am alw a y s pleased to h e a r y o u sing.” B y w h ich rem a rk ion will porcelvo that be had become en tirely reconciled to th e g u itar. , ' It was the evening o f Gbrlstmaih^ qay—Miles Guernsey sat alone in this p a r lo r , th o u g h t on his brow, an d a pipe i n his m o n th, when M ik e enter­ ed w ith a d a in ty , rose-perfum ed three- cornered note, “ F ro m th e owld m a id, S n r,” said half uv ’em wid cbildher uv their own, an’ not knowin’ what they’re cornin’ t o ; a n ’ th e o w ld— I m a n e M iss Osborne, w int—” g “ O f course she did,” interrupted his m aster. “ G o on.” -“ A n ’ she prayed wid th e poor thing, ah ’ th e y so s a y she’s goin’ to ’do p t it, an* th e y ’l l never s p h a k e to her* a g in.” “ W h ich would b e a very g reat p i t y ! ” said th e old bachelor, with em p h asis, an d ra th e r a diabolical grin. • “ Y is, sur. A n d now I suppose we'll be a f te f m o v ing sure, for i t only naded th e b a b y to m a k e it com p lete; ow ld—I m a n e M iss Osborne, cats, dogs an d babies.” “ G e t m e m y g r e a t coat,” was the only answ e r he received. “ I ’l l ans­ wer th e note personally.” * A n d th e g r e a t co a t on, a w ay s tarted Miles Guernsey for Rose Cottage once more. “ Bedad,” said Mike, with an in­ toxicated wink, “ it's mesilf knew he would not shtand the baby.” xr:— rx-u ------- » - ------ by,” sh e s a id, tu rn in g a w ay ; a n d then tu r n in g b&ck to say, with another m e rry lau g h , “ Y o u ’d s carcely believe it, M r. G u e rnsey, b u t W a i f is jealous, and 80 is P u s s and fier dangbter.” A n d t h e r e t h e y were— W a i f o n one side o f h e r , and th e ca t a n d h e r k i t te a on the other,* a l l th e objects o f iiis detestation grouped together in one terrib le tableau I “ O n e m o m ent. M iss O sborne, be­ fore you go,” he stammered, “ I have com e to ask— ” “ Ask anything I can grant,” said Miss Osborne, “ and I will grant, for you have been a kind neighbor—I hope I may say friend—and this mer- C h r i s tm a ^ ^ ” i ll grant, for 3n a kind iy friend— ry C h r i s tm a ^ ^ ” “ You are to be my wife,\ inter* vwaw yw UU UiJ nUVf 0 lUbVl’' TOpted M iles Gruernsey, a 'wonderful look o f love lighting up his face. The baby wonl!^ have been drop­ ped then if he hadn’t canght it.^— But he did calch it, and the old maid, too, in his strong, tender arms. I won’t tell you What she said, but I will say that nowhere on earth was there a merrier Christmas party than at that Rose' Cottage that Christmas night; and I wilt say farther, that the following summer a Mrs. Miles Guernsey helped to saperintend the culture of the early cucumbers and )eas in M i l e s G u e r n s e y ’s m in iatu r e regetable garden, and that a number of use bushes found their way across the daisy spangled meadow and over the fence to the border o f the neatly kept lawn, and on that same neatly kept lawn a wee baby girl tumbled about unreproved, with W aif as a constant companion, and Mary Ann, the cat, as an occasional visitor. And I will still fu r th e r s a y t h a t the n e x t C h rist­ mas there was a grandma in the house, a n d a grandson with his m o th­ er's light brown hair and bis father’s dark eyes, and the most abject slave to ^both little ones was M ike, the “ widdy man.” THE VAUDERBILT WILL. Wha-t a Son-in-Law Says. M r . G e o rge Osgood is reported as talk in g in this w ise; “ A s fa r as I ’m concerned, I don’t-in tend to e n ter i n t o any such d ir ty business a s a ttem p tiilg to 'b r e a k th e will. I don’t propose f;o ‘throw good good money a f ter b a d .’ I worked too hard for w h a t P v e g ot, and won’t spend i t try in g to g e t a dedd m a n ’s money. I have no rig h t to 4o it. I am no relation to Comm o d o re V a n d e rbilt, b u t m y wife is, and I know t h a t she won’t h e lp to c o n test it. She has jep e a ted ly inform ed the heirs W ATEBSOH ON SPILLED M ILK . liiouisvllle Coarier-Jouraal {D«n.)J \Hie deed Is done, and there is in this, as'in most .matters, a'certain ex­ pediency, not to . e a j- unw M o m , in jrefipiuffzQver spilled milk. The milk that was spilled was good milk. The pail that contained it was of stout cedar, with brass hoops. What of th a t ? T h e m ilk is gone. T h e brass hooped piggiu is broken at the foun­ tain. 'You ask me how 1 feel ? I can only tell you that I feel too much rt - spect for my^ people and my conn- rrj to fall into, pa^ionate, unmanly, imbecile outcry. The inanfs'nration o f Hayes, under these circnmsteaees, is something of a calamity. But tie world will not stop on its axis; tbe people will live, move, and have the r beiog; parties will continue to e x is t; politicians will plan and pk-t, I espec­ ially urge upon Democrats the good sense, as well as the duty of doing three 'things, to wit: First—Preserve the party organization intact, without a flaw or doubt. Second—Suppress violent thoughts and extreme ejacula­ tion, for anger never mended any cause. T h i r d —T r e a t H a y e s lik e a gentleman until he proves himself a usurper by bis acts. C IV IL RIGHTS I N ST. LOUIS. to that effect. The first thing that would probably be done would be the a p p o in tm e n t o f a receiver. T h is would probably be W illiam , as he is th e best custodian o f tb e property.— Then w o u ld-begin a series o f argi m e n ts , and th e whole a fiair would b irsonal. T h is would tak e 10 years. course they think they could ?ait that length of time.— ghters have each half .rs in the will which OOIBQ nO W H TO T B E S m S S . A Clevmr a n d P r e t t y W o m a n T u m i to th e Life o f a n Oi^ah^Giinder. From tbe Manchester Guardian. On the 13th of January an infant .about a month old was found in one of • the waitii old bachelor first entered it. Instead o f roses, C h ristm a s greens .dotted with brilliant red berries looped back the curtains, enwreathed the pictures, and drooped from vases an d shells, and right over the tall wax candles burn­ ing on the center table hung a branch of mistletoe (sent with kindly greet­ ings and a real Hnglish plom padding from some kinsfolk across the sea), its waxen berries gleaming like clouded pearls among its slender green leaves. Miss Osborne had evidently not ex­ baby on b e r knees, its small, pink toes held out toward tbe welcome warmth, and itself cooing and gurgling after the fashion p e c u liar to extreme yontb. How lovely she looked, with spray of holly in her hair, a tender light in her eyes, and tbe loose sleeves kMMmr dark silk falling b«eic firom her shapely white arms, as she held the child with motherly grace and softly sang a dreamy nursery rhyme I Miles Guernsey thought of a b ^ u tifal Ma­ donna be bad seen in R o m e , as b e looked earnestly at her, a moment be­ fore she became aware o f his presence. (The black-eyed maid servant going oiit in a burry as be reached tbe dcor, he had enter^ unheard.) A t last she started up, the roses in her cheeks sweeter and pinker than ever, “ A irry G b riatinas I” s h e cried. “ H o w good o f y on to com e so early I I ’ll g o and call brother Robert.\ “ I d o n 't w a n t t o see y o u r brother,” said th e old bachelor — ** a t least n o t yet. I cam e to ask— ” “ I was su re you would,” said Mias Osborne, b reaking o u t in to a J a n g b like a young g irl’s. “ I to ld m o ther «o this m o rning. I know w h a t y o u cam e to ask.” ** A r e you q u ite certain you do ?” old bachelor, _ an odd sm ile ag rooms at the railw a y station. Temple Meads, Bristol. The police have nouf arrested the mother. She is a well-educated young woman, about twenty-eight years of age. She states that her name is Winifred Campbell, that she is the daughter of respectable parents, who resided st ghter and cheeri- Bridgewater, where her father occn- summer day^he- -pied « good p<witioB as an organist, but that both _her father and mother are now dead. She married, early in life, an engineer on board a steamboat, by whom she had . five children.— Some few years ago h e r gran d fath e r left h e r a sum o f £ 8 2 0 , a n d upon com ­ in g into possession o f this legacy h e r husband left off g o ing to sea and took th e B in g o f B e lls, p u b lic house, a t B ridgew a ter, an d giving w a y to dis­ sipation he eventually deserted his wife, going off with another woman. M m. C am p b e ll got into-very low cir- cam stances and c a m e to B ristol. She was a hig h ly educated wom an, an d being able to speak Italian fiuently, she by some means got introduced to the itinerant organ-grinders, who liyo in considerable, numbers at the com­ mon lodging-house on St. James’ Back, and for whom she was in the habit of writing letters to friends in Italy. A padrone, who used to let organs on hire to his fellow-country- men, paid her attention, and about twelve months ago she went to live with him, and they traveled tbe coun­ try together. Tbe birth of the child which she is charged with deserting his face, u n til it darlk spreading over -danced i n M s taandsome d a r eyes. Qutie ceriatn/* said the old maid, seriously. ” But we really don’t need your help, M r. Q a e r o s e y ; to r al­ though wo are far from rich, we have enough to share with this dear little one, sent to me, it seems—-don’t think me tboUah—-as a precious Cliristmtto ;ift on tbe blesi^d Christmas day—the lay M a r y dup e d bar beauliful boy to her heart in the stable at Beihle- bepa. See, isn’t she pretty ? And so plump! Take herriu your arms. I »m sure you, who are so kind to cats a n d dogs, m u s t alm o s t l o v e t h i s m o tb- erless l i tt l e girl.” A n d eh e l a i d th e child in the arms ot the man who had never held a baby before, an d who looked down upon it w ith som e thing very l ik e t e a rs g litte r “ Yes, i t is p r e tty a everytMog you wiy jpe, Mim O sowxuci, b o r n e ; bui> u t ph Rom—pardon j|,v , ijxiwa v/o u p lea se tak e i t back. I ’m afirald o f it.. I t 's m a k ing fearful m o n ths a t m e, an d I ’m Sara it’e going to scream ,” said tb e old *h^^ ior, afte r holding b a b y exactly liuotes, th e tearsi, I f they e y were M iss OihornC) you m ean ” s a i d , m s s ter- stemsly. lv . “ J>on*t c a ll h e r I S e ^is m a s te r , Sten an old maid again.” bad two m iuote s, th e teans, i f th w< tears, gone, s q d th e stuite back ag a in . “ D o t a k e i t , I beg» o r I sh a ll ' ii * i© o |d m a id held o u t h e r arm s. d rop it.” Xb< m afford to w a it ' You see the daugl a million dollars they will get, no matter how it ends. Each can afford to give $25,000 on the start, and whether they should be successful or otherwise, there would be $ 4 7 5 ,0 0 0 rem a m in g . B u t they qan afford to wait no matter how long it takes. T h e y are a l l rich and do n o t 3ording to th e ir parents’ pres­ en t w e alth, would in h e r it only ab o u t $50,000 each, w h ile W illiam ’s chil­ dren would g e t about eight o r ten m illions. T h is is w h a t they dislike the most. A m eeting o f the dissatis­ fied heirs was held, and M r. Tbi was delegated to go to W illiam to see if be would not increase the am o u n ts given to the other heirs.. N o sum m nam e d as a lim it, b u t M r. T h o rn knew about w h a t would satisfy them all.— H e saw W illiam , who stated th a t i f th e will were probated, he would act ‘m u n if icen t ly w ith th e m a l l .’ M r . T h o rn endeavored to hav e W illfem nam e some am o u n t as a basis. This he em p h a tically declined to do. M r. Thorn returned with this message.— A f t e r t h a t they went to see W illiam individually, add h e told them th a t when the money belonged to him he would dispose of i t ju s tly . I thin ’” ’* ■*' h k i t is a j u st will ? th a t Comm odore “ Do indeed, and I th i n k t h a t Com m V a n d e rb ilt’s nam e will go down to eternal oblivion for tbe manner in which he has disposed of bis money. 'He has made too great a distinction with his children. Tbe public sees that, and it has created an unfavora­ ble im p ression in regard to the chil­ dren. T h e m oney t ' have been divided miore dre n . T h e m oney s h o u ld certain!; evenly. IS th e resu lt of this intim a c y , and states th a t w h e a 't h e in tan little m o re th a n a fortnight old she went w ith th e Ita l i a n to P a u lton, where he becam e jealous on account ol seeing her speak to two men. H e upbraided h e r for so doing, left h e r th e re destitute an d r e t u r n ^ t o B ris­ to l ; b u t shortly after his d e p a rture one of the organs which belonged to him was returned to the wom an, and w ith this she traveled to B a th , where she pledged the instrnmeat. Sihe then wandered about the country for several days, but finally returned to Bristol. Being destitute, she became very dflflpoading, god ebe elates th a t luorc th a n once s h e w e n t to the riv e r for th e purpiwe o f d row n ing h e r s e lf and child, b u t relented, an d eventu- ually conceived the id e a o f d e p o siting the child in one o f the waiting-rooms a t th e railw a y station, where i t was discovered. She was subsequentlj m et in B risto l b y itin e r a n t o rean-play- s to whom she was know n , a n d who (ked h e r for th e child, a n d h e r reply to them was th a t it was being well cared Jbr. These I talian s com m u n i­ cated the fact to th e padrone, who b a d been to S w indon, D e v iz es a n d o th e r places in search o f b e r, a n d h e a t once g a v e Inform ation to t h e police. I t was suspected t h a t th e infant w h ich h»d been left a t th e railw a y station wa» tue child o f Gampbell, ibr whom ieqairies were m ede, and she Wfia o& S a tu rd a y discovered in th e B ristol W o rkhouse an d arrested on a charge o f abandoning th e infant.^ S h e ad - m ittod th e & e t, and. on being tak e s to th e police s tation n a r rated h e r hifi- torj to the officer pn duty, i@r A man bonght a gallon of gin to take home, and, by the Way of a label, w rote bift nam e upon a card which happened to be the seven of clubs, and tied i t to the handle. A friend, com ing along and observing the jog, quietly remarked: ^‘That’s a n aw ful carelew w a y to leave th a t said Tom . „ liqnor!” «*W h y r iis v e betBn d iv i d e d ; ^ o r e ev e n ly , that each child hai3 been given one or two m illions, a n d W illiam the rem a in­ d e r ; then they would a l l 'h a v e been perfectly gatifified,and William would have h a d a sufficient a m o u n t to carry on the N e w Y o r k C e n tral an d keep it in the Vanderbilt name.” M r. Osgood s tated t h a t he thought th e Comm o d o re, while m a k ing his codicils, would have made mention of each a thing if it had beeii intended. He declared that it was very singular that the will made no mention o f some people who were his constant compan­ io n s ; it did not bequeath to them “ even a jack-knife.” Another thought that the statement of the million for friends was somewhat premature.— The question was gsked what would be tbe result if tbe contestants gained the suit. It was thought that accord­ in g to the law there would be an even division. Klleintopf, the barber on' Olive street, says th e St, Louis Fimes, has studied the civil rig h ts bill. H e was standing in the fro n t p a r t of h is b a r ­ ber shop yesjerday, when a sprucely dressed darj& ^ swl|ohiDg a cane and re m a r k e d : “ I want to get shaved.” “ A il rig h t, responded M r. Ellein- topf, have you a cup here ?” “ No.” “ C a n ’t shave you unless yon have your own cup,” “ I ’ll buy one. W ill you sell m e one ■ “ C e rtainly, s ir.” “ How much is it?” “ F i v e h u n d r e d d o llars.” “ What?” “ F iv e hundred dollars.” “ You m ean to- debar m e from g e t­ ting shaved ?” •“ D o you w a n t a cup ?” “ A t t h a t price ?” “ Y es.” “ N o .” “ G it, t h e n .” K lein to p f assum ed the attitu d e o f a boss bouncer, and th e A f rican went through the door as i f p ropelled from a catapnit. S p i t z D o gs .— T h e s e im p o rted an i­ m als, which are favorites am o n g dog fa n c ie i s , are considered dan g e r o u s property, as their bite frequently re­ su lt s in h y d r o p h o b ia. T h e N e w Y o r k /Sun gives these two instances occur­ ring last w e e k : Y e s terday W illiam C. E g leston o f N e w B righton, buried his little d a u g h ter A d e la ide, who died.on Sun­ day from hydrophobia. R e tu rn in g from school a m o n th ago, she patted on th e head a Spitz dog. T h e a n im a l bit one o f h e r fingers. A week ago sh e w a s taken sick with all the s y m p ­ toms o f h y d rophobia, and in th irty - six hours was dead. A n o ther case is th a t o f W a lte r C lark , aged 13, who was bitten two weeks ago by a Spitz dog not rab id . Y e s terday, when of­ fered a g lass o f water, he began to froth a t the m o n th. HE WAS SATISFIED* A young married man, o f extreme­ ly jealous disposition recently visited me of the most famous clairvoyants in the city, wanted to know doing. ■ “ Siihe Being far from home, he what his wife was is looking oat o f the window, evidently expecting some one.” “ That is strange,” said Benedict; “ who can she expect ?” “ Some one enters the door, and she caresses him fondly,’’ clairvoyant. It can't he !” cried the excited husband; “ my wife is true to me.” “ Now he lays Ms head on her Jap and looks tenderly in her eyes.” “ I t’s false, I ’Jl make you pay dear ly for- this,” yelled the. hoshand. “ Now he wags hfe tail,” said tbe medium. Some clerical blunders a r b a t once pardonable and am u sing, but others a t times are bard to endure.— A _ p a rishioner who never went through a sum m e r w ithout c o m p lain­ in g b itterly o f th e heat, mimU toiithe annoyance o f h is friends, a t last took sick and died. H is pastor was a b s e n t a t the tim e and did. not hear o f the sad event. O n bis retu r n he m e t . th e son o f the deceased, and unw ittingly inquired, saying, “ W e ll, my friend, how does your father bear th e h e a t now ?” im a g in e his surprise a t being told t h a t the f a th e r had been dead two months, and his bew ilderm ent w h en the hope was expressed t h a t th e place to which be h a d gone was not noted for th e height of its tem p e rature. Iu a th riv in g town o f M ichi­ gan a y e a r o r two ago, when alm o s t everybody was a g e n t for som ething o her, a cer‘- ’“ ^ ...... sing bless th e stranger cam e from , ig inform e d th a t D r . S. h a d brought it, he stood in a brown study for a m o m ent, w h en, w ith the look o f one who bad solved a difficult m a t­ ter, he ask e d : . “ Say, pa, is he ag e n t for them ?” other, a certain infant of that town being blessed by the advent of a baby brother, was very inquisitive to where the strangi iiqg The green-eyed monster subsidedi and Mr. Youughusband cheerfuliy paid over Ms five dollars, 1 ^ One of the saddest things about the “ small boy” of ti^e present day, is the uncertainty which seems to -at­ tend him as he hounds'along through life. You can’t always tell what he is going to say. A t a Sunday school aervlce' held not long ago, in a neigh­ boring city, an amiable’ clergyman, endeavoring to illustrate the necessity of thuGhristiaa profession iu order rightly to enjoy the benefactions of Providence, spoke as follows; “ For instan«se, I want to introduce water lute my house; 1 have it pumped-*’** Ihe pipes and faucet^ arc in good or­ der, but I get no water The rea- sen, he isished the young people to see, waa that he had no oommanlea- tion with the main in thestreet. But the boys were too Intent on plumbing and water rates. “ Now why do I get r ‘U know” shrieked a “ yoa don't p f ij r no water' little 0 Q 6 , Si” A florist wasshowing an Irish­ man over his establishnicnt the other day. “ Now,” said he, “ we’ll just look in for a moment at the germina­ ting hoUBo.” “ The German*ating home* is it?” xeplied the other.— '■ Troth and I’m glad, for it’s hungry am. Bat JSh’t t e e some Irish dhrinxln’ saloon Just as handy ?” ySST The women of Disco wear col-' ored boots, red or yellow, of dressed skin, reaching to the knee ; then white trowsers,, and a colored jacket fitting close about the neck and falling jast below the tops of the trowsers, -Seal­ sk in j a c k e t s and trow sers are worn in cold weather. The jacket has a long hood attached to it, in which the ba­ bies a r e carried . ‘ I n lo o k s th e y re­ semble the Chinese, especially about the eyes, and seldom use water except for drinking. A F l o r id a w o m a n , th in k in g “ Neuralgia,” which she found on a medicine bottle, was a pretty name, gave it to her little girl, thus forever beclouding her malrimonial prospeetfi, for who would want to have Neural­ gia ail the timeT^' teacher o f a five-yci “ Yeth’m.” “ Well, what i s ' i t “ N e v e r to lead a s m a ll tru m p when you hold both bowera.” Wf* We can generally tell what a lan’s going to do next, -when he pnts the lighted end of a cigar into hia month by miatake* A n Iow a j o u r n a l speaks o f a m an having beep lynched “ for b u r n ­ in g t h e b a r n an d contents o f M s s o n - itt-law.\ ~ A sm a rt school boy saye i t takes th irteen letters t o s p e ll cow, » n d proves it th u s ; “ S e e O ! double J ^ H o w d ru n k h a s a m a n g o t t o b e w h en b is dog can’t follow h im ? ar Every man is a volume if you know how to read him.

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