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Tri-states union. (Port Jervis, Orange Co., N.Y.) 1850-1924, December 19, 1912, Image 6

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iekoot O f EV i BY isdixon \^ 1k Bivens laughed c.vuically. •'This might he serious. Woodman, if it wasn’t funny. But you had as well know once and for nil that I owe you nothing. Your suit ha.s been lost under the grand areh whi<-h led Into the hall. Bivens was the center of an admiring group of s.vcophants »,nd wor­ shipful snobs. The doctor’s heart gave n mad throb of joy. Hi.« hour had Copyright, 1911, by Thom as Dixon (CONTINUED.) AYhen the last note of the sone- 'lied away, quivering with a suueniatar'd teiiderne.ss and i)a.ssion he brushed a tear from his eyes. lifted his hand:’ high above his head and made a mo­ tion which said to her. “'rumultuous applause.\ She nd^ded and smiled, and he rush ed behind'tlie sx eues t o . ask au. e.ypla with pricelc'^s jewels, and each man bowed before her in Immaculate even­ ing clothes. From the four corners of the vast room were released thousands of gorgeous ly tinted butterflies, imported from the tropics for the occasion As the dancers glided through the dazzling scene these wonderfully colored crea tures fluttered about them in myriads, darting and circling in every direction among the flowers and lights until the 'Poom seemed a veritable fairyland. A burst of applause swept the crowd \vxnat on eartn does this me:ipV\ 1 Nan’s radiant figure passed, encir- “Simply that P was engaged' to sins? | leader. -tonight, and I wanted to surprise vm>. ►-tnart nodded and clapped his hands .Didu-t you like mv song?” ‘ ‘ . I enthusiasm. I \It iifred me to the gates of heaven, f ^ marvelous transformation scarcely be imagined. I \Then I don't care whether any one Wi.se heard it or not. But I did .so much Harriet, but she had gone. rvNd.sh that she might have heard it or < ^ her husband because they are from the nation. e.'£cit?ment. r,-. ■ \What on earth does this me:ip‘;” Your appeal lias I xumi forfeiled. My ' answer is brief, hut to tlie [toiut—liot i \ quick strides he covered tiie oue cent. My generosity is for m.^ ' “But I don't understand—your father hates Bivens so.\ A big hand was laid on his shoulder he turip'd and faced the doctor smiling “But 1 don’t hate him. my boy! I’vo given* up such foplishuess. M'e've buried the hatchet. I’m to see him in a few minutes and we are to be good friends.” -•Bivens invited you here to discuss a business proposition tonight!\ Stuari ewiaimed, blankly. “No, no, no,” the doctor answered ‘T came with Harriet, of course. Her music te a c h e r placed her on the pro gratUv But Mr. Bivens and i have had some correspondence and I’m him In a little while aud talk things over quite informally, of conr.se, but effectively.” “He has agreed to a conferen<*e ^'^'“’-iiere?” the young lawyer asked, anxiously*, s ' “Why. ofcotin.se. His butler has jus! told me he would see me immediately after the ball begins.\ Stuart breathed easier aud turned to Harriet. “You look glorious tonight, little pall 'Funny that I never saw you in.even ing ctress before. You look so t:tH aud que^ly, so-gro-wn, so mature. You’re hegi&ring to make me feel old. child. I’ll be thinking of you as a grown .woman next” ’T am twenty-four, you know,” she said, simply. * “1 have never believed it until to­ night. I wouldn’t have known you at first but for your voice. 1 had to rub my eyes then.” ' The lights were suddenly turned low.ef,. api^pachiug- total . darkness The attendants' noiselessly removed '’the temporary stage and cleared the great room for the dancers. ‘ As the chimes struck the hour of midnight, skeleton heads slowly began itq appear peeping from the shadows 'of the arched ceiling and from every nook and corner of the huge cornice and pillars, praperies of filmy crape sflowing gently in the breeze were lighted by sulphurous hued electric rays from the balconies. Tiny electric lights blinked in every skeleton’s Bunken e.\es and behind ea<*h grinuiug row of teeth. Suddenly two white figures drew aside the heavy curtains In %he archvray and the dancers marched into Ihe somlier room. [\ The men were dressed as shrouded Bkeletons and the women as worms The men wore light flimsy gray robes W which skillful artists had painted on fo u r 'sides in deej) colors the pic­ tures of human skeletons. [ The wome.ff n-ore curious light robes of cotton fiber v.hich were drawn ove'- .the entire body and gave to each figure the appearance of a huge caterpillar, j The strange fiuriu-es began to move slowly across (he polished floor to the etrains of, a ghostlike waltz, i From the corners of the high balco­ nies strange fights flashed, developing In hideous outlines and phosphor­ escent colors of the skeletons and long, fuzzy, exaggerated lines of the ac­ companying worms. The effect was thrilling. » Suddenly the music stopped with a crash. Ea'-h gho.stly couple, skeleton and woi'ui. stood motionless. The silvery note of a trumpet called from the sky The blinking eyes of the death heads in the ceiling and on the wall-’ faded slowly. The trumpel pe.aleil a second signal—the darkness fle! and the great room sudclent? tji —>d with 10.000 electric lights. The ■ hestra struck the first notes of a : iifing waltz, and. presto, in an in .It the women appeared in all Iht •odor of the most gorgeous gowns was suddenly laid on his arm, and he turned to confront Nan. her eyes flashing with triumph, her cheeks flushed and her lips parted in a tender smile. “Come. I’m going ta honor you by sitting out the next two dances.” When she had seated her.selt by *his side under a bower of roses he was very still for a moment. She looked up with a quizzical expression aud “A penny for your thoughts. Am I so very wicked after all?\ “I don't think I have ever seen any­ thing more dazzlingly beautiful than your banquet and ball, except the wo man who conceived aud e.\ecnted It. I was just wondering whether yoi lni«glnatlon was vivid enough to have dreamed half the splendors of such a life when you turned from the little cottage 1 built for you.” A look of pain clouded the fair face, and she lifted her jeweled hand. “Please, Jim. I’d like to forget some things.\ “And you haven't forgotten?” She looked straight into his eyes and answered in even tones: “No.” Both were silent for a long while, and then they began to talk in low tones of the life they had lived as boy and girl in the old south and forgot the flight of time. C H A P T E R XVI. Q. T h e L a s t Illusion. longer Dr. Woodman watch- I ed the barbaric, sensual dis- B play of wealth sweeping be- 1 'fore him, the deeper his spirits sank. The butler touched his arm. and he turned with a sudden start. “Mr. Biv-ens will be pleased to see you in the little library, sir, if you will come at once.\ When the doctor was ushered Into the'library Bivens, wbo was awaiting him alone, sprang to bis feet with a look of blank amazement, and then a smile began to play about his hard mouth. “My servant announced that a gen­ tleman wished to speak to me a mo­ ment. Will you be good enough to tell me what you are doing in this house tonight?\ The doctor paused and hesitated, bis face scarlet from the deliberate tn- “I mu.st really ask yonr pardon. Mr v Bivens, for my apparent intrusion. It is only ajiparent 1 came with my daughter. She sang tonight o» your program.” \Oh. t see. with the other hired singers. Well, what do you want?” \Only a few minutes of your time on a matter of grave importanee.” “1 don't care to discuss business here tonight. Woodman.” Bivens broke In abruptly. \Come to my office.” “I have been there three or four times.” the doctor went on bunrledly. “and wrote you twice. I felt sure th a t | my letters bad not reached you. I hoped for the chance of a moment to­ night to la.v my case before you.” “All right. I’ll give you five min- “1 felt sure you had not seen my letters.” “I’ll ease your mind on that ques­ tion. I did see them both. You got answer?” ‘That’s just It. 1 didn’t And 1 couldn’t understand It.\ “Oh. I see!” Bivens’ mouth quivered With the sllgh.test sneer. “Perhaps it was lost In rransit!\ The- sneer was lost on the doctor. He was too intent on his purpose. “I know. It was a mistake. I see It now, and I’m perfectly willing to pay for that mistake by accepting even iiei!- bare arms aud necks flu.shuig half of your last proposition.” friends—not my enemlp.s. “Bat we are not enemie.s persotially,” the doctor exi)luiued good uaturedly. \I have put all bitterness out of my heart and come tonight to a.sk that by­ gones be bygones. You know that in lOod’s great book of accounts you are iny debtor,\ “1 owe you nothing.\ In every accent of the financier's voice the man before him felt the deadly inerci.’ess hatred whose fires hud been smoldering for years. , The doctor’s voice was full of ten derness when he re'plied at last: \My boy.\ he began quietly—“for yon ,‘ire still a boy when you stand be .side my gray hairs—men may figlit one another for a great principle without being i>er.soual enemies. We are men .still, with i-ommoD bope.s, fears, ills, griefs and joys. When I was a soldier 1 fought the southern array, shot ami shot to kill. 1 was fighting for a prin­ ciple. When the firing censed 1 beli)ec1 rile wounded men on the field as I came to them.” His voice quivered and broke for an instant. “You have won. You can afford to be generous. That you can deny me ini this the hour of my desolation is unthinkable. I’m not pleading for miyself. J can live on a rat’s allow ance. I'm begging for my little girl. need S2.00U immediately to com­ plete her musical studies. Deep down in your heart of hearts you know that the act would be one of justice be­ tween man and man.” ’As a charity. Woodman. I might give yon the paltry SriO.OOO you ask.” “I’ll htkp it as a charity,” he cried eagerly, \take it with joy and gratitude and thank God for his salvation sent in the hour of my need ” “But in reality you demand justice of me’; Come to the point. Woodman, what is in your mind when you sa.\ that 1 am your debtor?” “Simply that 1 have always known that your formula for that drink was a prescription which 1 compounded years ago and which you often filled for me when I was busy. As a phy slcJan 1 could not patent such a thing Yoti had as mueh right to patent it as lin y one else.” “In other words.” Bivens interrupted | coldly, \you inform me that .vou have alwa.i.-i known that I stole from your prescription counter the formula which .gave 'no my first fortune,\ The financier began to speak with .sli w venomous energy: “I've let .vou ramble on in your ranndlin talk. Woodman, becau.se it imased me For years I’ve waited youir coming. Y'our unexpected ad­ vent is the sweetest triumph of this festival night.” He paused and a sinister smile pla.ved about his mouth. “The last time I saw you 1 promised myself that I'd make you come to me the next time and when yon did that ,vou’d come on your hands and kuees. And I swore that when you looked up into my face groveling and whining for mercy as you have tonight. I’d call my servants and order them to kick you down my doorstep.” P(. I/.'•i.-/-'! -ffnss the ma.ssive flat top tuesK lO . 4IB Cie • trie The doctor’s Sst suddeniy gripped the outstretched hand and his eyes glared into the face of the riuancier with the dangerous look of a madman “You had better uot ring that bell, yet.\ he said, with forced quiet rn his “Y’our tirade gives me an idea.” said Bivens. “I want you to stay until tfje festivities end. and enjoy y.-;irsei'f. Take a look over my ho>;:-e. It ,-ust two imillious to build it, and requires half a million a year to keep it up. The butterflies those dancers are crush ing beneath their feet in ray ballroom^ I imported from Central America at a cost of $5,000. The favors In jewel- rj- ! shall give to my rich guests who have no use for them will be worth .$2.5.000. Remember that I sjient three hundred and fifty thou.sand on this banquet, which lasted eight hours and that I will see you aud your diiugbter dead and in the bottomless pit before I will give you one penny. Enjoy yourself, it’s a fine evening.” Before the doctor could- answer, the ffnanner laughed and left the room. For a long time the dazed man stood nmtion-te.s.s. He passed his big hand over bis forehead in a- vague instinc­ tive physical effort to lift the fog of horror and despair that was slowly strangling him. Be felt that he was suffcH-ating. He tore collar apart to- give himself room ilto breathe. He thrust hts hand into the hip pocket of bis dress strit where he usually carried a handker­ chief and felt something bard and It was a revolver he had been accus­ tomed to carry of late in his rounds throBgh the dangerous quarters of the city. Without thinking when he dressed, he had transferred it to bis evening .suit. His hand clo.sed over the ivory handle with a sudden fierce joy. “Ye.s. I’ll kill him in his magnificent ballroom, to the strains of his own music!\ he said, half aloud. ’‘1*11 give a fit clllmax to his dance of death and the worm.” He quickly descended the stairs aiffi saw Bivens talking with his wife. He didn’t wish to kill him in her pres­ ence. and as he passed a look of hatred flashed from the little black eyes of the millionaire. He made up his mind to kill him at the moment the dance was at the highest pitch of ga.vety. •stiace which .cejiarated them and v.ltb out a momeiifs he-siraliou tlinist his- hand into his breast for his revolver. Not a muscle or nerve quivered. His fingei- touched the- trigger softly and he gave Riven.s a look which be meant jiiiiiii mil ill’ Touched T rig g e r once more whirled Into the center of the room and the crowd filled the itipuce he should take with him into eternity, when just beyond him he saw Harriet. She stood motionless with a Iqok of mute agony on her fair young face, watching Stuart talk to Bivens’ wife. His finger slipped from the trigger, and his hand loosed its deadly grip. \Have 1 forgotten my babyT he cried in sudden anguish. And then another vision flashed through his excited brain. A courtroom, a prisoner, his own bowed figure the center of a thou­ sand eyes while the jury brought in their verdict. His breath came in labored gasps as •me mad thought succeeded another. \Nol” he said hoarsely. “1 must save her. I mu.st be cunning. I mu.st succeed not fail. I must get what 1 came h€>re for. 1 must save my baby. My own fate la of no importance. She is everything.” Bivens had taken from him by fraud his formula, destroyed his business and robbed him of all'he pos.sessed. The law gave him power to hold it. He. too. would appeal to the same power and take what belonged to him. No matter how, he would take it, and he would take it tonight. Bi-/eus had boasted that his favors in jewelry^ would be worth $25,000. The doctor turned ipiickly aud began to search the hou.se until he found the half drunken .servant arranging these packages under the direction of a sec­ retary. These favortvj bad been made for the occasion by a famous jeweler— a diamond pin of peculi.-ir de.sign, a gold death’s bead with diamond teeth and e.ve.s surmouuted by a butterfly and a caterpillar. The stoiTGS in each piece were worth .$1uu. They lay on a tail® in oi>en jewel boxes, fifty in a box. and each box contained $5.0(K) worth of gold and |>recious stones. The doctor inspected tbe boxes with exclamation.s of wonder and admira tion. He bent low over tbe table for an instant, and when he left one of the jewel ca.ses rested securely in hi.s pocket. He was amazed- at his own skill and a thrill of fierce triumph filled his being as he realized that he, had succeeded and that his little girl would go to Eurofie and complete her work He spoke pleasantly to the secretary and congratulating him on bis good fortune in securing such » master. turned and strolled leisurely back to the ballroom. Not for a moment did he dovtbt the safety of bis act! He was a chemist and knew the secret of tbe laboratory He would melt the gold; into a single bar and sell tbe diamonds as he need­ ed: them. His only regret was that he coulii not have taken the full amount he had demanded' of the little scoun­ drel. He found Harriet and they start­ ed at once for home. “Did you have a goo<l time?” “Yes. when t could forget the pain In my heart. You succeeded? It’s all right? I'm- going abroad at onee to. study?” The doctor laughed aloud In a burst of fierce joy. . “Cei’taiiiliy. my dear!” T h e te.ars sprang into tbe g e n t le eyes as sbe answered gratefully. “You can’t know bow happy you've made me.” Bivens, wbo bad beard the doctor’s laughter, passed and said with exag­ gerated conrte.sy: “1 trust .von have enjoyed the even­ ing, Woodman?” The doctor laugh«>d again in hi.s face. “More than I can po.ssibly tell you.” Bivens followe<l to tbe door and watched him slowly walk down the CHAPTER XVII. T h e P a r tin g o f th « W a y s. |*^r^HE two weeks which followed I the Bivens ball were the happiest Harriet Woodman had known since Nan's shadow had fallen across her life. Every moment was crowded with the work of preparing for her trip, except out of his life. Harriet watched him with keen joy and deep in her heart a secret hope began to grow .slowly. The day she sailed be refused to go with her to the f>ier. \Why. .lim. ydu must come with me!\ sbe jn’otested. \No. 1 can’t, little pal. Goodby.\ He waichcd the cab roll down Fourth stn'ct towiird the pier while a great wave of loneliness overwhelmed him. At night the cloct(»r was not a', home Stuart rtipped on bis door next moro- ing and got m» jinswer The girl said he had spent the night out—she didn't know where. As Stuart wa.s about to leave for his office the doctor entered, dis bloodshot eye.s were sunken deep behind his brovv.s. his f:ic e haggard and his shoulders drooi>ed Stmirt knew be had tramped the strei'ts all night in a stupor of ho{)eiess nysery. f^tuart took his outstretched hand and led him into the library. “1 know why you tramped the streets: the old bon.sp is very lonely.” \1 never knew what loneliness meant before!\ The big hand fell in a gesture of desfiair. Stuart pressed his hand. “I understand. I'm younger th.nn vou doctor, but I. too. have walked that way alone. You're all in; you must go to bed and sleep.\ When Stuart returned early from his work in the afternoon he found a group of forlorn women and children standing beside the stoop, .-i pale, elf ish looking boy of ten. whose face ap peared to be five years older, sat on the lower step crying. \W’hat’s the matter, kiddie?” he ask­ ed kindly. “I wants de doctor—me mudder’.s sick. She’ll croak before mornin’ ef he don’t come—dey ail wants him.” He waved his dirty little hand toward the others. “He ain't come around no more for a week. The goil says we can't see him—he’s asleep.\ ’’I'll tell him you’re here. The doc .•or’s been ill himself.\ He urged the doctor to go at ou<-e te see his patients. The work he b)vert would restore his spirits. He was dura founded at the answer he received \No. no! I'm in no mood to work. I couldn’t'help them. I’d poison and kill them all. feeling as 1 do today. A i)hy sician can't heal the sick unless there's- iiealiug in his own soul.. I'd bring death, not life, into their horne.s. Tel 'hem to go away!” Stuart empfied his pockets of all the money he had in a desperate effort to break their di.s.-ippoiTitment. ^ \The dix-tor’s too ill to see you no-W.\ lie cx[>liijned \He sent this money for and h o p e s ii u-ill h e l p yon over rhe vvoi-sf until he can come \ He divided the irioney among them, and they hxfked at It with dull disap- Iioiiiimeiit They were glad to get it. but \vb;jt they needed more than mon- ev was the hope and strength of their frletid’s presein e. **I>,)ctor.” Stuart l:;egan gently, “I’ve known yon for about fifteen ye:irs You're the only father I've Imd in thi.s big town, and you've been a gocai one.. You've been acting stra-tigely for the [tasl tw'o week.s. You're in trouble.” “The greatest troutiie that can c o m e to any human soul.\ was thq»bitter an swer. \But.\ he t>rtti.sed. aud his eye.s. stared at the ceiUug as he gro:itied •pve got to be:ir it. Wtntt’s the use to whine'f Stu.-irt steitped close anil slipfted his arm about the stalw.art figure. His voice wa.s ten-ler. \Come doctor: you're not fooling me I’ve known you- too long.' There's only ■tne rntm on earth for whom Fd- do as much as 1 wou'id I’oi- you—my own gray htiired father (U»wu south. Gomt now: tell me whafs the trouble?” Stmirt couid feel tlie big form swai\ aud treuible'under- the-stress of over [i The Light for the Home f°r toL use —-th e b e s t la m p y o u c a n b u y is th e R a y o . T h e re is n o glare; no flicker. T h e light is soft a n d clear. The Rayo is a low priced lam p , b u t you c a nnot get better light at an y price. R ^ o lam p s are lighting m o re than three million hom es. Save the Children b Eyes—and Your Own. The -V LiHITIT) Lighted without Temoving chim n e y or I shade. Easy to clean and rewick. Made in various sty les and for all purposes. A t Dealers Everywhere STANDARD Oil COMPANY CF NEW YORK Albany Bo.^iton Buffalo N ew Y o rk Swinton & Company arc having a Special Sale on POCKET FLASH LIGHTS. See Uieir window lor variety and prices. SWINTON & eo. The music began, and the dancers- -the hours she could nbt refuse-Stuart; who had suddenly waked to the fact that something beautiful was going I ' / A, “You—did—what?\ whelming emotion, and his arm pre.ssp^ a little closer. Aud then the tension suddenly broke. The doctor sauk into a eh:iir ami looked up with a helpless stare. \Yes. Jim. I will. I’ll-tell—yon ” And he related his experiences in the Bivens mansion, ending with; \1—stole- - a —case—of—jewels!\ Stuart sprang to his feet, with an ex clamation of horror. “You—did- what!” “Yes,” the doctor went on hoai'sely. \1 stole a case of his jewels and sent my girl abroad I’m going to plead guilty now and go to prison. I shall never again lift my bead in tbe haunts^ of men.” Stuart .sobbed In anguish. ^Tq Be Continued.) Acceptable GIFTS. Y o u w ill find here th e b e s t n s s o r t m e n t fo r m e n a n d b o y s . I t is a t o u r sto r e t h a t m e n m a k e th e i r o w n purch.ases because t h e c h a r ­ a c t e r i/f o u r m e r c h a n d ise is in d iv i d u a l. S p e c ial a t t e n t i o n is given t o w o m e n w h o w a n t c o r ­ rec t f u r n i s h in g s t o r m en a n d Best Neckwear Values in Town ' B e a u tifu l $1 a n d $ 1 .5 0 h ig h g r a d e silk a n d L n i tt e d n e c k w e a r in single h o l id a y boxes. S u p e r io r q 'la J i ty a t d desig n s in o u r 50c n e c k w e a r , one in a h o lid a y box. Gifts for Men and Boys. H o u s e C o a t s . . . ...........................................................................50c t o $ 1 0 L o u n g i n g R o b e s .................................................................................... $ 6 to $ 1 0 F a n c y S h i n s ........................................................................................... $1 to $ 2 M u fflers.................................................................... 50c t o $ 2 P a j a m a s ............................................................................................$ 1 % ) $3 S w e a t e r C o a t s .........................................'......................................$1 to $6 N e c k w e a r ......................... ....................................................... .25o t o $ 1 .5 0 S u i t C a s e s a n d B a g s .............. . ........ . .......................................$ 1 t o $ 1 0 T r u n k s ...................................................................................... $ 3 5 0 t o $ 2 5 S u s p e n d e r.s..............................................................................25c t o $ 1 .5 0 G lo v e s ......................................................................................... 50c t o $ 5 S u i t s ....... . ........................................................... $ 1 0 to $ 3 0 H o s i t r y ..................................................................................................... 1 5 c t o $ 1 U m b r e l l a s .......................................................................................75c to $5 C a n v s ......................................................................................................... 5 0 c t o $ 3 H a n d k e r c h ie f s .......................................................................................1 0 c t o $ 1 S c a r f Pins................................................................................................25c t o $ 2 L i n k s a n d S i u d s .............................................. 50 c t o $ 5 H a t s ............................................................................................................. $ 1 to $ 5 C a p s ........................................................................................................... 5 0 c t o $ 2 F u r C a p s ........................................................................................... $ 1 .5 0 t o $ 6 F u r L ined O v e r c o a ts..............................................................$ 2 0 t o $ 7 5 P lu s h Lined O v e r c o a t s ........................................................ $ 1 8 t o $ 3 0 ^ v e r c o a t s .................................................. -...............................$ 1 0 to $ 3 0 . J. M. DeWITT, Cor. Pike a n d Ball Sls.» P o rt Jervis, N. Y.

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