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Newark union-gazette, the Marion enterprise. (Newark, N.Y.) 1939-1941, April 11, 1940, Image 13

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kiEPl-JONE 710 NEWARK UNION-GAZETTE AND MARION .ENTERPRISE, THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1940 N e w a r k U n i o n - G a z e t t e THE MARION ENTERPRISE f W e lco m e , L ittle .5 5 GREELEY HOWARD Editor and Publisher | published every Thursday a t Newark G range Buiidihg 10 4 jjjjUer St., Newark, N, Y. Phone 710, _ . ' 5’ |TwK=riMd‘)tion Blnce 1908 n f T h e N e w a rk Union, esta b lish e d in i« 7 o I Tlie AfraUian W e e k ly G a z e tte, estab lish e d in 1887. * | Sn[, reJ as second c la s s mail: m a t t e r a t th e N e w a rk, N. Y. Postofflee. IsCHIPTION BATES: Year $2.00 6 Mb. $li00-. I Mo. $.50 1 Copy $.06 ieligious Bigotry D enounced things which Senator R o b e rt A. T a f t of Ohio said ,, ,|ifi-ch. in Kentucky ■ re c ently a le so much to the point ,vume when the w o rld needs to bury prejudices based on. religious or racial grounds, (hat we venture to emote ■ T.ift'.s rem a rks here: In America m any hostile people have learned to respect Lh oilier s beliefs and to conduct a dem o cratic governm e n t Inin „i oppressing those with different beliefs.' But w e do ,1 tendency, perhaps reflected from Europe: to build up ' jrejiidn-i- against men because of their religion. ' Ii IS said that a m an cannot be elected to office because ? jVc t mie of the m a jority; and there are those who delib- latel' -try to spread that kind of prejudice. It is contrary i evciv principle of the A m erican Constitution. It can have Jo iss;nis;.1 except .to d e s troy the .inalienable rights guaranteed i every citizen.. It looks .to the sam e kind of oppressions persecutions of m inorities which We see today in Ger- Ji;in\ and Russia. D em o c racy itself cannot long exist if lincmty rights are destroyed. Any man born in the U n ited States can b e elected to any tire, whether h e b e Protestant, Catholic or Jew, provided [nly that his political views m eet the approval of a m ajority : tin- electorate. T h e .U n ited States of A m erica has alw ays ■ecu ts and must rem ain, the citadel of religious freedom |ud ieligious toleration.” is hard to see how any A m e rican who sincerely believes I the principles of dem o c racy can fail to endorse M r. T a ft's ltei.in es. N o thing can so certainly ; u n d e rm ine the very tmnd.itions of the A m erican system than to deprive or at- fempt to deprive any citizen of his full and equal rights be- Use he professes a different religion, descends from a dif- treat iace or speaks the language of his country with an Infanuliar accent. Today and Tom o rrow h ; immi er,... I\ ;) ■tig . Ip.s l-.o, I'tv I l i t . l.-A . o: r . i i ‘ . l a ’ .' nrisi jr. a I.\.! j!.. l.cr - hi r It- • • In;... \NK P. STOCKBRIDGE \IS:\I system ■ ’he word Com m u n ism ■ m e a n a p a r ticu la r governm e n t w h ich adopted in R u ssia and : the R u s s ians are try - i.ayert 'th e rest of the ■> '.til'd m e a n a com p lete ,n the special and ecor ;■ from th a t to w h ich uMomed. T h e R u s s ian ictuaily no t one of i.-m in th e literal sense >r comm o n ow n e rship ■petty In R u ssia every- ciudmg th e lives an d of the m asses of th e .• controlled by a sm a ll called the C o m m u n ist ' m e m b e rship is lim it- '■■cr t h e P a r t y gets too •■ tubers the- leaders kill '.A -a few thousand, so ;■ c o n trol in a sm a ll an d •iihned group. t \ i . m system , th e r e - .o: real Com m u n ism , ■ t.nical system of nfiw=- 4ANITY . com m u n ism .;•< tim e s thro u g h o u t . idea has tak e n XQQt. ' 'm m u n ism , in which fi any advantage over ni m a terial posses- : all contrib u ted to a ■tore of w e a lth, w h ich u disposal of every ! the com m u n ity, a- the prin c ip le-u n d e r early C h r is tian com- - and ' congregations : , y took th i s pure form ' inism to be th e direct a uf-Q u u s t^B rotkeshood, ■ ■ them literally th a t all ire b r o th e r s an d all narc alike. ■t them in to trouble •: non-C h r is tian n e ig h - w it h t h e political pow- ■_ c o u n tr ies in (Which!they :' prevented th e - p o iiti- i tt taxing them , because I owned an y th in g he pay taxes. people existed chiefly to • ■ venue for th e ir politi- this early form of l:-.'v was so persecuted ■‘■t a few h u n d r e d years ; nave up th e struggle 'Pi ed th e existing p o liti- Fl.( t i o n . . experim e n ts |u< *. , 1 -ri -utopia\ h a s be- l110 a minion noun m e a n ing I-tof.v. and p e r fect com m u n - | w -tatc Scores of philoso- X w ritten books telling f on versa! contentm e n t B • • -achieved, a n d h u n - ' 't ’.om p ts to_wofk i t out I \\Tr’ or less lim ited scale lvp a* a m ade. All tout one or i n . ''p a t t e m p ts have faii- 1 1 ’. and the ones th a t ■ i-ve done so by aban- ;; : » ' t o f th e i r original ■f a. ivtic principles. ’ -dl of th e s e experi- _ ■ ve been tried in. th e I \ \ - ■''••tit’s, beginning w ith Ip ” \- :nri't of th e Pilgrim s i, 11 *.t la, w h e re everything ■' ■ <;d. in com m o n . . After ’-ars Com m u n ism was I o 'f ' d because t h e younger ■: led at w o rking to sup- ri-t m ' : m e n ’s families. ' ■''’rm o n s 'h a v e succeeded 11 * a n y o th e r group in building a com m u n ity life in which, though all are n o t equal, none is allowed to starve. T h e | M o n p o n empire, has been built j on the foundation of rigid reli­ gious control of th e lives of its m em b e rs. T h a t is' also true of th e only o th e r surviving experim e n t of th e sort, th e O n e ida C o m m u n ­ ity. B o th t h e O n e ida P e r f e c tio n ­ is t s 3S2f:ffib’ M o rm o n ' C h tirch of Jesus C h r is t o f L a t t e r Day S a in ts h a d to abandon som e of th e i r original principles i n order ! to survive. (INDEPENDENCE . . . efforts i All o f th e e a r l y efforts in t h i s country to establish som e thing like t h e com m u n a l system of th e early C h r istia n s were m a d e by groups of individuals actin g independently of an y Govern­ m e n t. \ I t did not occur to th e foun­ ders o f th e m o st fam o u s of t h e com m u n a l en terp r ises o f a cen ­ tury ago, B rook F a r m in M a ssa- ■ o h u s e tts.'that th e i r v e n tu r e w as an y th in g in w h ich governm e n t w as or ought to be concerned. T h e m o s t em inent intellectual and religious leaders of t h e tim e [\joined in th e B rook F a r m ex ­ perim e n t, o r .gave it th e i r sup- ! p o rt, because th e y saw no o th e r ! way to d e m o n s tr a tee th e ideal I way o f life w h ich th e y h a d I v isualized. B rook F a r m failed because its po.vple failed to recognize in ­ equalities in tale n t and ability betw e e n individuals, and were so com p le te ly com m itted t o th e ideals of D e m o c racy a n d in d i­ vidual . liberty t h a t th e y would n o t subject a n y \ 'm e m b e r ' o f th e ir colony to discipline, eith e r religious o r political. S. S. LESSON | W elles D a ta Seen V a luable F O R k*D e term iningU .S .C o u rse pm- *■ hr.‘ j>v;e jri>\ j Ins- ■ f a.-' ‘Chief Grateful To Well-Wishers April 9. 1940 To the E d itor. Newark U n ion-G a z e tte. D e a r Sir: T h r o u g h your publication I w ish to express m y sincere a p ­ preciation- to th e people of N e w . ark for th e m a n y kind com m e n ts an d expressions tendered m e re ­ cently on m y r e tirem e n t as C h ief of Police. T h e fine th in g s p r i n t ­ ed and said ab o u t m e an d m y long police care e r overw h elm ed an d oveujoyed m e m o re th a n I can say. Especially do I w ish to th a n k th e sponsors -of th e surprise b a n q u e t given me, th e Village 'Board for its splendid resolution tendered me. an d all of m y friends, w h o m I never, knew were so num e rous an d whose kind rem e m b rances will lighten m y life through the rem a inder of w h a tever m a y be i n store for me. . SOLON E= McKOWN. By REV. ROBERT II. HARPER H o sea Tells of G o d ’s Forgiving Love. Lesson for April 14: Hoseu 6: 1-7; 14: ,4-9. G o lden T e x t; 1 John. 1: 9. W h e n a general, w h o h a d served in the federal arm y , was censured because, he received his erring wife back to his home, he said he knew of no law of God or m a n th a t m a d e it a ■ h e inous th in g 'f o r a m a n to tor- j give a woman. T w e n ty-seven I c e n turies before. Hosea- had fur- j given faithless G o m e r and read , in his own tragic experience a | parable of Israel's apostasy and | G o d ’s forgiving love, I M a n y references in his prophecy indicate th a t Hosea w as a native jof th e N o rthern K ingdom . A your?': contem p o r­ ary of Amos and cider contem ­ porary of Isaiah and M icah. he probably began ha. m inistry the m iddle of the -tehth century. B. C. He labo - d during the reigns of several kings of J u d a h a n d Israel b u t t h e corditions he denounced were greauy ag g r a ­ vated in the turb u len t period th a t followed the death of J e r o ­ boam II. ’ His denunciation of existing evils was sim ilar to th a t of Amos, b u t the latter em p h a sized the justice of God while Hosea em p h asized the divine love. T h e first section of t h e lesson te x t deals w ith a backsliding people who were w a rned th a t th e y could not gain th e divine favor in m ere religious obser- 1 vances. The second section p r e ­ sents a beautiful p ictu r e of G o d ’s grace under th e figure of the springtim e . S p r ingtim e will come again to every soul th a t tru ly tu r n s to God. If the tragic picture’ of evil conditions in H o sea’s tim e seem s strangely m o d e m , let us know th a t b a d things o f th e present I a re offensive u n to G o d a n d th a t [tm r peopleTrm st first-rctttnTTin-- ■ to him if they would m a k e I things' b e tter lAild surely the [ m a n who retu r n s from th e sor- ; row an d tragedy of th e years to the F a t h e r ’s house will be for­ given. First American -Tourists The first to u r is ts to leave A m e rica and travel about E u r- 'ope.. w ere considered th e roO'st intelligent an d progressive m en of th e ir age. a n d included Em ­ erson, Poe. Fennim o re Cooper, W ashing-tn Irv in g , B a y a r d T a y ­ lor, Longfellow, O liver W endell Holmes, an d H o race Greeley; SPECIAL TO UNION-GAZETTE W a s h ington. Apr. 10—If w h a t th e retu r n in g U n d e rsecretary of S t a te rep o rted to th e P r e s id e n t a n d S e c r e tary H u ll is ever ,put in p r in t, th e volume m ig h t be en titled \T h e E d u c a tion of S u m ­ n e r W elles.’1 T h e re is no doubt th a t Mr. W ellea a f t e r a m o n th 's to u r of Europe in w h ich h e . had long conversations w ith tlie heads of all the governm e n ts w h ich are at w a r and th e most im p o r tan t of tlie n e u tr a l nations, is the b e s t- m f o r m e d m a n in A m e rica, if not in th e world, as to th e aim s and desires of G r e a t B r it­ ain. France. G e rm a n y and Italy. He is th e one person living who is able to com p a re and check from first-h a n d in f o r m a ­ tion th e avowed objectives of all of t h e E u ropean belligerents. W h e ther a n y th in g im m e d iate­ ly tangible com e s of Mr. W elles’s' exploration o r not. t h e value of th e in f o r m a tio n w h ich he brought back m a y be^very great,, as a guide to th e fu tu r e a t t i tu d e of th e U n ited S tates. N o thing could be m o re definite th a n Mr: W elles's sta te m e n t on his r e tu r n th a t h e took no peace proposals w ith him , no peace proposals w e re offered to him an d th a t h is G o v e rnm e n t did not send him abroad to talk a b o u t peace. N e v e rtheless, .the belief still p e r s is ts am o n g S e n a tors an d C o n g ressm e n , as well a s am o n g S tatem e n an d observers abroad, th a t th e p r incipal purpose of th e P r e s id e n t in sending Mr. W elles on h is m ission w a s to p u t our G o v e rnm e n t in a posi­ tion w h e re, if o p p o r tu n ity o f ­ fered. it could tak e a stro n g h a n d in peace n e g o tiatio n s and gain a g r e a t econom ic ad v a n ­ tag e in.. w o rld a f fairs by using th e power of our n a tio n a l w e a lth to im p o se peace te r m s w h ich w o u ld s t r e n g t h e n the_allied--na- tions and be of np g r e a t a id to G e n ii any. T h a t G e r m a n y is try in g to stir up trouble in th e U n ited S ta te s and create a public opinion in opposition to supplying m u n i­ tions to E n g land an d F r a n c e is indicated by th e publication in G e rm any of docum e n ts w h ich th e G e rm a n governm e n t claim s to have found in th e official files of the Polish Foreign Office in W arsaw. They consist chiefly of w h a t are said to be reports by Polish officials of conversations w ith the Am erican A m b a ssadors in W arsaw. London and P a r i s , These A m e rican 'officials are re ­ ported a s having said, in effect, jthat the U n ited S tates was, t r y ­ ing to induce E n g land to go to w a r w ith G e rm a n y and t h a t th is country would certainly be in th e war a f te r it starte d T a k e n Seriously ‘W hile nobody in- W a s h ington believes th e r e is any tru t h in the statem e n ts given o u t by th e G e rm a n s, they are tak e n seri­ ously a s a w a rning to th is Gov­ ernm e n t th a t if it continues to b? friendly to th e Allies, G e r ­ m any will regard itse l f .a s .j .u s - tified im considering the U n ited S tates a n enem y . T h a t w a s about th e way G e rm a n y acted in th e W orld W ar of 1914-18, w ith th e result th a t we did get into th e war. W h ile nobody can in te r p r e t the presidential m ind, and th e belief still persists iii som e q u a r - i ters th a t Mr. Roosevelt expects I to find a way to convince tho FIVE YEARS AGO Newark U n ion-G a z e tte t April 12, 1935 A kitchen show e r Was given M o n d ay evening, by tjlrs. Jacob's class of the M e thodist C h u rch in honor of Alice M a thes of - C r a e~e- A ve- - Whtr- w ilf-tic—tntrrne d -p in Ju n e . - ' i TEN YEARS AGO Newark U n ion-G a z e tte I April 11, 1930 j: Born, a daughter, Nancy R u th, [ to Mr. and Mrs. R ich a r d Holmes S a tu r d a y a t H ighland Hospital, R o c h e s ter . , . B ilotta B rothers are planning to have a fast in ­ door as w e ll as outdoor ball tea m this sum m e r . . . M iss A n n a V anDettsen of Newark, w h o has been a prim a r y teacher at th e Lyons U n ion School- f o r 34 years,, h a s resigned h e r posi­ tion to tak e effect in J u n e . TWENTY YEARS AGO N ew ark U n ion-G a z e tte A p ril 9, 1920 H, .A, I n m a n , of t h e H. A.- I n ­ m a n Com p any, special m a c h ine m .anufacturers .of this. • village, will build a foundry as soon as th e W eather .perm its . . , S t u a r t R e ed’gnoved from ‘ W e s t Ave. to t i e house of Mrs. F. M. Alierton, M a son St. , . . C. D. L indstrom m o v f i| to his new ly p u r c h a s e d ' h f u s a 8 P rospect St. . . . J a m e s 0 . W e lc h e r lias purchased the residence a t 11 M aple Court of Mrs.- E. E. B u rleigh. THIRTY YEARS AGO Union G a z e tte April 9, 1910 T h e G r e a t A tlantic & Pacific T e a Co. is p r e p a r in g to open th e ir new store in th e W hite block on M o n d ay, April 11. The local m a n a g e r will be C h a rles Bonsey, w h o will be assisted by our popular tow n s m a n Fred C. W h ite a t th e opening M onday . . . J a m e s M. P i t k in w a s elected E m m inent C o m m a n d e r of Zen- obia_C o m n iandery in Palm y ra W ednesday night . . C h a rles H. Jones, son of M r and Mrs. H. J. Jones of th is village and Miss Leqra H a u g h . d a u g h ter of Mr and' M rs F . A. H a u g h of Clyde were m a r r ied S a turday aftern o o n a t th e bride’s home, by Rev M r P r a t t , p a s to r of the Clyde M e thodist C h u rch. FORTY YEARS AGO A rcadia W e e k ly'G a z e tte April 11, 1900 D H. C h a p m a n & Co. ■ sold th e ir horses a n d livery ’ -acces­ sories' a t au c tio n .S a turday , . . On F riday evening th e Tw e n ­ tie t h C e n tury C lub will rfseet w ith E E. Dem p sey . VEL M C h a p m a n has m o v ed from B a ­ tav ia to W yoming. N Y. -w h e re he is su p e r in ten d e n t of & c a n ­ ning factory, FIFTY YEARS AGO Newark* Union April 12, 1890 F C Z im m e rlin has been a p ­ pointed po s tm a s ter at Lyons . . . O. C Robinson h a s purchased the Dr. V-anDuseh place on .the' corner of M ain St. an d M aple C o u rt . . . T a toi- an d B e n d e r have m oved th e i r w o rkshop dow n s tairs . . . H o n . E. K. B u r n ­ ham has purchased a h a lf i n te r ­ est in the E d g e tt C a n n in g fac- torv. Hero era travel bargains that IjtRt in recent ^ vear*—*,« Saving spelled with a J Sample Reduced Ferret One-Way Rd.'Tri^ Albany ------ ¥3.00 *- 5:45 6.70 13.10 Baltim o re B o s to n :' . Rrockport Buffalo . Chicago . Cleveland’ N. Y* City Pittsburgh Toronto . 5.95 .95 1.85 9.25 4.50 4.95 6;00 4430 10175 1.75 3.35 16.70 8115 8.95 10.85 8.30 G r e y h o u n d T e r m in a l .1 n i t u t £ I u u M >2-.-. G R E Y H O U N D Mb* BOY, / WAf WORRIED WHEN THE CHIMNEY CAUGHT FIRE A T THE HOUSE LAST NIGHT GOOP THINS THEY HAD A TELEPHONE. THEY GO T HELP RIGHT AWAY . 1 l.v-l The protection a telephone brings to the farm family is really something to crow about. A big fire generally begins as a small blaze. With a telephone you can get help quickly from the neigh- bors or the fire department'when that help counts most—before the fire gets out of control. Your invest­ ment in farm property needs the protection of a telephone, N E W A F a r m T e lep h o n e - C o s ts O n ly 6 c to 10c a D a y . W h y N o t O r d e r Y o u r s a t th e B u s i n e s s O ffice? T i people of th e U n ited S tates t h a t , a serious foreign crisis is a t ' hand, in which i t would be. fool­ ish to .put u n tr ied m e n in power, I tlie th ir d - te r m talk is actually growing less. Since Mr. Farley cam e ou t ih tlie open and declared th a t he wilt be a candidate for t h e D e m - , erratic nom ination regardless of w h o ever else w a n ts it, th e Ad- i m inistration’s s u p p o r ter! are be­ ginning to talk m o re ab o u t o th e r persons w h o would be acceptable to Mr. Roosevelt to h e a d th e Demoor-atic—ticket.— T h a t— Mr-. Farley a n d V ice-P resident Ga: ■ tier are w o rking as a team to 1 prevent Mr. R o o sevelt's renom - I ination is generally believed 1 No New T a x Laws * (C o n tinued on’ P a g e 14) Member Federal: Risen e System D o y o u n e e d to b o r r o w to m e e t a n in s u r a n c e **’ p r e m i u m , p a y tax e s ,, m a k e a m o r t g a g e p a y ­ m e n t o r fo r o t h e r e m e r g e n c y e x p e n s e s ? If. so, c o n s i d e r a L in c o l n - A l li a n c e P e r s o n a l L o a n . Y o u m a y b o r r o w $ 1 9 0 to $2 > 0 0 - a t a re a s o n ­ a b le ra t e , w i t h o u t a c o - m a k e r , if y o u m e e t o u r sim p le, b u s i n e s s - lik e re q u i r e m e n ts. L i n c o l n -A l l i a n c e B a n k a n d T r u s t C o m p a n y Newark, N. Y. \TH E LOWEST PRICED C A R S D I D N ’T SEEM TO C O M P A R E W I T H OLDSMOBILE’S SM A R T , STREAMLINE STYLING. SO WE PAID THE LITTLE DIFFERENCE IN PRICE A N D GO T THE BEST LOOKING CAR OF THEM A I L ! \ O LDSM OBILE has s t y l e — s tyle all its ow n ! F r o m s p a r H m g , tite - e a s t ra d i a t o r g r i ll e to - s m a r t l y Stream lined re a r co m p a r tm e n t— 7 it\s the last w o r d in “looks.” And you can take it- from th o u s a n d s of e lj t h u - . siastic ow n e rs, the big Olds Sixty has ev e r y th in g else necessary for m o d e rn m o toring. M o re length, m o re w e ight, m o re p o w e r and m o re big-car fe a t u r e s than any low -priced'-ear! D rop in, to d a y — d r ive an O lds! O lds p r i c e s begin a t $ 8 0 7 fo r C o u p e s , $ 8 5 3 f o r Sedans, delivered at Lansing, M ich., Transportation based oh rail rates, state and local taxes ( i f any-,) optional eq u ipm e n t and a c c e s s o r i e s — e x tra .. P r i c e s su b je c t to ch a n g e w i th o u t n o tice. A.aQJWiftRJVJL MOTORS V iL U B Help orojhoto iofefy — dim yOuf hghH whort pojjtng I N e w a r k M o t o r s , I n c . W a y n e C h e v r o l e t , I n c . NEW ARK, VI,\S LYONS,* N . Y ..

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