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Newark union-gazette, the Marion enterprise. (Newark, N.Y.) 1939-1941, November 14, 1940, Image 11

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£1_£PH0NE 710 NEWARK UNION-GAZETTE AND MARION ENTERPRISE. . THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1940 ELEVEN Newark Union-Gazette j THE MARION ENTERPRISE | qr -ACE GREELEY HOWARD E d itor a n d Publisher W o r l d S a m a r i t a n •hiiihed evei-y T h u rsday at N e w a rk G range B u ilding, 104 E a s t M iller S t., N ewark, N, Y. Phone 710. Eft- . 1 , 11 ml since 1908 of Tho Xmv.hiU I’nimi, i.«t.U.lishprt iri IS72 aml Tlhi- .Yrradinn- Weekly Uuzrti.*. pst.ibljsh.'d in I 8 S 7 . :,s second class mail rmittri* at tli.i Xow.arlc, X. Postoflico A s c r ip t io n r a t e s : ypit v $2.00 t! Mu«, ifi.iMi i Mos. §.;,o 1 ropy A m e r i c a ’s ‘W a l l o p I n d e x ’ Now that this nation is really swinging into its national defense program, there is a good chance to look around and judge some of the factors that would give any possible ag­ gressor pause before it— or he—-went looking log trouble °;th the United: States. £x,-.mining the facts of the case, the Conclusion is inescap- jjrle that it is the industrial might of this country that is our test insurance against getting embroiled with any other nation in the world. Col. Willard M. Chevalier, publisher of Busi­ es W eek, has, for instance, collected some very pertin'en.t iratntn s on this subject. Col. Chevalier has estimated Amer- jra's wallop index,’-’ based on the national capacity to pro­ duce the essentials necessary to carry on a modern war— jlems like coal> oil. steel, autos, ahd electric power. 'Setting at 100 the German, capacity to produce these re- jonn-fi. our own capacity would figure at 242,” he declares. Stacm d up against the totalitarian powers, the United States jlijl h... the edge despite the recent industrial and agricultural acquisitions of Hitler and his Axis partners.\ the steel industry as an example, the noted analyst'' Tho capacity of U, S. mills at the beginning of 81,619,500 tons. This is nearly twice last year’s Germany .and the countries that have come under Gerni.m control where mills were operating at a feverish pace. per cent greater than the production of the Romc- jjprlin.-Tokyo axis; arid it falls only 15,000,000 tons short cf the output of the entire world outside the United States, but im-lnding Russia and the British Empire.” Industrial production Slone does not make a country stron. . National faith and national unity are vital, too. But when ..II work together, the result surely is foreordained. - - —J ---- . ----------- - --------- - ------------------------- — ------- . -------- -------- C.ti: contip. e Author o f “ B .ovjio W in Friends and Influence People.” GETTING A RAISE Here s a letter that persuaded a bank president to give a janitur j raise— a letter containing superb psychology, writ­ ten In William Nichols, a colored janitor at the Feoples Bank nd also at the Post Office, at Roxboro, North Caro­ lina. illinm holds down several other small jobs such as firing fomaiK, mowing lawns and gardening. He is one of the most energetic colored men in town. H- went to the post office where he could use a typewriter ad sit down and pecked off a letter to Gor on C. Hunter, wr president of the bank. William Nichols has not had and', -ilucation, ahd he wrote as he would have spoken. one with a college education could have written a Istei that was more psychologically sound. Better spelling, yes. belter psychology, no. He talked in terms of the other lellnrv This is his letter: Bear Sir: I wants to express my appreciation for all the nice things vou hue done* for me since you have ben a njember of the People Bank, an for the mount of money I owe the Bank. It you will give me one more month, I will pay you in three payment .and thanks to you, but may 1 ask you to reason 'vith me just a moment. '' •i i be the janitor for a few minutes and let me be Mr. Hunter. \ ou have give me the best of your services for the las 14 years with the average of 3 hours for every day and tfti ays to the year,_or 10,095 hours each year an I pay you We™ 1 5 and 18 cents per hour an you have got to pay your nouse rent an feed and close your famaly. Buy wood anco.il .ind carry yc5ur insurance an pay your doctor W1I and your children to school an if you are smart enuff to fine something else tp do, thats no reason 1 shouldnt pay you Wat you is worth to me, ^ I \Now less change back. You be Mr. Hunter and I be William. 1 havfc said to you before, I love my job and I w,s tn keep my job as long as I can, but I will sure thank t /'i..’’.-.MU—wfil...raise. „niy-.s alary— . IL-you-iLo. and- .iL-yau.. W’t. it is still my job. Thank you sir. After you have finish sll wnik an dont have one thing-to worry your mine, you ll remember me. t tl “From William Nickels.” I asked Mr. Hunter if William Nickels got his raise. He ■tplietl. 't cs, indeed, he got his raise! We could have found ,, dozen other people to have done the work for less, juid still haye been within the limitations of the Wage and ^ Hour Bill, but vre thought he deserved the raise for his letter. That janitor used wisdom as profound as Plato. FIV E YEARS AGO N e w a rk U n ion-G a z e tte N o v em b er 15, 1935 C h a rles H. H e rrick of N e w a rk w a s chosen new p r e s id e n t of t h e W ayne C o u n ty B a r A ssociation . . . D r. A lan V a lentine w a s in ­ ducted as p r e s id e n t of U n iver­ sity of R o c h e s ter . . . R e c e n t b ir th s include a son,. D o n a ld , E v an, to Mr. an d M rs. H a rry W. Rowe on Nov. 5, a d a u g h ter, N ancy Ja n e , to' M r. .and Mrs. L. H. C o n tan t on Nov. 6, and a d a u g h ter, Jacqueline Elinor, to M r. an d M rs. R o b e rt W age I . . . M iss G race DiS.anto of N e w a rk an d F r a n k Trom b ino o f Lyons were m a rried. Nov. 12, TEN YEARS AGO New ark U n ion-G a z e tte ; November 14, 1930/ W. L. Mussack, of E lm ira h a s been appointed m a n a g e r of th e local M o n tgom e ry W a rd store . . . B o rn to Mr., and Mrs. M e r- rell M. DuBois, Nov. l l , a d a u g h ­ te r . . . The w e d d ing of M iss C e lena V a ssuer an d C h a r les N o rsen tpok place Nov. 8 . . . G o rdon M e y e r h a s been p r o m o t­ ed to m a n a g e r of the 17th d is­ tric t o f th e A ssociated G a s ah d E lectric Co., w ith h e a d q u a r ters in New.ark. C h a irm a n o f th e show c o m m i ts, c lasses a r e expected to be e n - tee, an d D o n a ld Cook, show j tered or show n , f rom th i s sta t e , m a n a g e r , announced. from th e M iddle a n d F a r W e s t, Six h u n d r e d pigeons arid six an d even from th e D o m inion o f h u n d r e d birds iii th e poultry C a n a d a . S S L E S S O N By REV. ROBERT H. HARPER Jesu s ’ C o n c ern for Life an d H e a lth. Lesson for N o v em b er 17: Luke 7:2-15. G o lden T e x t: Jo h n 10: 10. As th e G reat Physician Jesus m a n ifested his g r e a t love _ for m e n a n d freed th e m from ' th e m isery and lim itations of their afflictions. And surely we should be concerned as a C h ristian duty for our own h e a lth , t o keep ourselves physically fit, while giving o u r ’.suppurt to healing agencies for the benefit of ill the people. . In his saving m inistry Jesus' cam e in contact w ith a rem a r k ­ able m a n of a cruel age. T h o u g h a centurion, lie won the esteem of th e people am o n g whom lie w a s statio n e d ; th o u g h a m a s ter, he loved his se r v a n t and sought his cure; though a R o m an, h e exercised a fa it h g r e a ter th a n any th a t Jesu s h a d found in Israel. He w a s also a m a n o f fine discernm e n t and judgm e n t —reasoning from his own use of authority as a R o m an officer th a t Jc sus needed only to speak the word of healing from afar an d the serv a n t w o u ld be re ­ stored. T h e lesson shows Jesus as m o re th a n th e G r e a t Physician —as the Lord of life. E n tering th e village o f N.ain, he saw a sight as sorrow ful as can be im a g ined of h u m a n bereave­ m e n t—a widowed m o ther fol­ lowing h e r only s o n to th e grave. W h a t w o n d rous joy he brought to th a t m o th e r ’s h e a r t w h e n he raised t h a t only soil to life! W h a t am o v ing, com p a ssionate Saviour he i=, and how we should love him ! His works of healing an d his raising th e dead to life are evi­ dences indeed of h is concern for life and h e a lth , evidences o f his love fbr m en, and sym b o ls o f his larger m inistry to th e i r souls, of his offer to th e m to spiritual h e a l t h a n d h is assurance of end­ less life. This is what he did: he expressed appreciation for past av°ri. he told of the service rendered; he outlined the situa- n,m his point of view; he appealed fbr more money. ‘on f Oh Honored am o n g h is Our Honored Judge ,'ku; to thee, /~,li ,, Judge. 1 has lived . ■'••‘ iid.-, ™ distinction ire h i s field, •1:: vhc w o rld’s abounding reds., , man. am o n g com m o n if putation. yet, un- v . \ - !' :'ed. \5 ■■ 'rihr a clean fight ire this c.unpaign, ’■ J ”• b is race, ua-searred. Hie in tm at ion th a t h e hffs ■' ut , a llow-me.n ire town, ■V'5 1 ' lim 10 Fain success, To I Has And be void of all reflections. w h ich W ith 'sterling qualities, outstaiid. H e ’s a cred it to his profession, The Yewark I uion-GnzeUo 1 ms arranged vrltii the Office of Infor- rantl&ri of die \e i v York Stale Col­ leges of A g riculture and Home Eco­ nomics to answ e r quemtioiin about problems o t farm and hoiiie. I f you enclose a Nclf-ailflresseil, stamped envelope, and m ention tlie name of this paper, you will receive a direct reply to your query from the colleges. DO not ask more thnn one question in one letter or. on onb po kt card. .Ask as inany ques­ tions as you like, b u t m ake cdch one a sepnrate communication. H e a t V alue of Wood R. G . w a n ts to know how wood Aiid his sim p le ways am o n g his 1 c o m p a res w ith coal in , heating friends ' value, especially for som e o f the H as been .a w o rthw h ile lesson, trees found in farm woodlots. Professor A. B. R e c k n a g e l of : '•'ear WW.ll”. that * coveted ,)e great to I've a life, ■> character., so untjues- Ar.q • Hned, ■ v to those ■vights, aspiring H e 's firm an d .steadfast .in his faith , W ith th e courage of his con­ victions. H e 's bound to meet w ith great success, At least, t h a t ’s our predictions. W e’re proud to place h is honor­ ed nam e. In N e w a rk’s great cavalcade, And tru s t it’s just a stepping stone, In th e plans t h a t a r e well' laid. We know th a t h e ’l l be ju s t and fair, A n d in his work alert, So let us drin k a to a s t to him , 'T h e H o n o rable Lewis G ilbert. UUEMIS. th e forestry dep a r tm e n t an­ sw ers: “Com p ared w ith | coal with, a value o f 100. black locust h a s a heating value of 102. O th- ers, m o re th a n 90, include black i hirch hickory, iron wood, honey locust, w h ite oak, shadbush, and dogwood. .................. ........... “In the group th a t h a s a heatin g value .of from 80- to 90 are w h ite ash, jbeech, yellow birch, sugar m a p le,, rock oak. red oak, an d biack Oak. “Wopds t h a t r a te from 70 to 80 include black ash, w h ite birch, black cherry,, slippery elm, red m a p le, sycam o re, an d tam a rack. \E a c h year about tw o m illion cords of wood are used for fire­ wood in New Y o rk s t a t e . ” By F. P. STOCKBRIDGE DRAFT Com monsense To m e th e m o st in terestin g th in g ab o u t th e draw ing of num b e rs of young m e n to whom w ill be given m ilitary train in g is t h a t th e procedure com p letely ; failed to have th e effect w h ich m a n y politicians feared a n d ^predicted it would have. I n ­ stead of a n enorm o u s public •protest,' t h e d r a f t d e m o n s tr a ted th e innate com m o n sense of th e Am erican people, who h a v e a c ­ cepted compuL'O’y m ilitary training a s if it were a long- estabiished regular routine. As nearly as I can figure out, 'a l l of the outcry a g a i n s t th e 'd r a f t originated w ith a very sm a ll group of pacifists, p e r h a p s m o re o r less consciously egged on fiy C o m m u n ists. Politicians were scared, as politicians u s u a l­ ly are, by som e thing th a t w a s new in th e i r experience. T h e re is nothing w h ich resem b les a , scared ra b b it quite so m u c h a s ' th e average politician in a n election year. • I ’ve talkefil w itli a lot o f th e boys whose num b e rs cam e u r . W ithout exception, th e y 'r e a ll tii kied p ink a t t h e prospect. And th e wives o f th e ones w h o a r e I m a r r ied seem to be j u s t a s h a p ­ py. j W O M E N ......................... courage | T h e ridiculous an d se n tim e n tal notion th a t w o m en a r e th e less courageous sex, i f not th e w e a k ­ er, seem s t p have a stro n g hold on th e political m ind. U n til now, th e U n ited S t a te s h a s n o t faced a possible w a r situ a tio n w ith th e opinions of wom en voters t o | consider. T h e re w e ren’t an y | wom en voters th e last tim e we I w e n t to w a r, b u t w o m a n h o o d ’s | s e n tim e n ts w e re supposed to be expressed in the popular song: i “I d idn’t raise m y boy to be a soldier.” T h e politicians who opposed ■the d r a f t fo r fe a r of th e w o m - e n ’s vote should be reassured by now. T h e m o th e r s o f th e first boys d r a f ted are proud to have th e i r sons tak e n . O n e of th e m , i £ s» J i e»irx T-.,Bell,, was. i n T h c h a ll in W a s h ington w h e n th e first num b e r, 158, w a s d r a w n from th e bowl, an d i t w a s h e r own sons's num b e r. S h e could hardly re s tr a in h e r pride. PIONEERS . . . , , Srit T h e re sta n d s in W a s h ington a sculptured m e m o rial to th e pio­ neer’ wom en of A m e rica. One h a s only to look a t it, a n d th i n k of th e courage* a n d en d u r a n c e w h ich t h e w o m en displayed who m a d e th i s c o u n tr y w h a t i t is, to g e t over fJie Idea t h a t th e r e ’s an y th in g so f t about A m e rican women. W h e n it com es dow n to re a l grit, toughness o f m o r a l .fiber ah d clear ju d g m e n t be­ tw e e n rig h t a n d w rong I ’ll pick wom e n r a t h e r th a n m e n any tim e . I often th in k back t o t h e tales I h e a r d in m y boyhood, of m en an d women of m y ow n fam ily who h a d gone pioneering into th e w ilderness of th e A m e rican W est. One o f m y g r e a t - g r e a t - •grandmotihers was sixteen w h e n she arid h e r young h u s b a n d o f eighteen sta r te d fb r th e V a n - 1 dalia T e r r itory in a covered j wagon. H e r granddaughter-, m y grandm o ther, told me hciw h e r g r a n d m o ther hacU h a d to shoot! five In d ian s before th e redskins quit trying to b u r n th e log cabin , she a n d .m y g r e a t - g r e a t - g r a n d - ' fa th e r h a d b u i lt w ith th e i r own f h a n d s . | T h e w o m e n of . today don’t have to show th e i r courage in th e sam e w ay, b u t I ’m satisfied they have j u s t as m u c h -of i t a n d a r e very f a r from being th e p a r - | loi- p e ts w h ich sen tim e n tal song- i w r iters depict them . HOSTESSES im p o rtant I Add to th e list of w o m en’s fu n c tions in m ilitary service, t h e ! n e w ly-created posts o f hostesses a n d librarians in th e Army I t r a in in g cam p s. T h e re will be a senior hostess and two junior hostesses a t every Army Service Club. T h e ir job will be to super­ v i s e recreational teatures an d I social affairs, looking o u t 'f o r ! w o m en an d children visiting th e cam p , supervising service club I c a f e terias w h ich are lo be m a in- ‘tained for visitors, an d in gen- jeral to help m a k e life happier for the boys in train in g . T h e re are going to be plenty of beaks nnd reading m a t t e r for th e train e e s ’ s p a r e tim e , an d re ­ creation facilities of every kind. T h e life of a m o d e rn soidier is not rem o v ed from fe m i n i n e 'i n ­ fluence. j W o men's p a r t in war h a s al- | ways been im p o r tant. Fio.ence N ightingale paved th e way for w o m en nurse.s'Th Hie\ C rim e a n w a r betw een B r itain a n d Russia. T h e Red C rosi cam e into exist­ ence in our own Civil W ar. And , who does no t rem e m b e r th e de­ voted w o m en of th e Salvation 'A rm y , the “Y” an d th e rest of th e relief organizations who risked th e ir lives in F r a n c e to bring succor and com fort to our •soldiers? REALISM attack W h ile I'm ail for th e idea of giving every young m a n som e intensive m ilitary train in g , I get m o re and m o re doubtful a s to w h e th e r w e 're goitjg to be com­ pelled to go to w a r a t an y tim e ut th e n e a r future, unless our noliticians do som e thing to pro­ voke a fight. It will be a long. , tim e before any of th e aggres­ sor n a tions can get a r o u n d t o 1 attack in g th? U n ited S tates. 1 i I h a v e n 't any doubt one or m o re o f them will try it if we don’t p r e p a r e our resistance. B u t I’m beginning to believe th a t if .we go ah e a d w ith, n...bigjirogramw, of\defense by land, sea an d air, we’ll have plenty o f tim e t o defy ail com e rs before anybody is prepared to pick a fight w ith us. I t ’s easy to get all stirred up over th e outlook for w g r. I ’ve ■ h a r e d some of th e ap p r e h e n ­ sions o f a tt a c k from overseas myself. B u t w h e n I try to take a realistic view of our position and t h a t of t h e r e s t of t h e world, I confess th a t I can ’t see how the attack in g forces are going to g e t to us before we can stop thern, from any direction. We are likely to get into w a r only if • w e go overseas ourselves to fight. ■ ------ — --- o-i ---------- Every w o m a n who cans m eats and vegetables should have the pressure gauge on her cooker tested before each canning sea­ son. According to tests a t one T a t e experim e n t statio n , seven, out of 12 gauges on pressure cookers used, for can n in g were found to be wrong. TW E N T Y YEARS AGO N e w a rk U n ion-G a z e tte N o v em b er 12, 1920 Mr. and M rs. Judson P a d d e n o f Phelps a n d Mr. an d M rs. G e o rge R. Feller qf N e w a rk are now located a t S a n Diego, C a lif. . . . M iss M a ry J. V a n K o e v e rln- gen a n d F r a n k F a g n e r were m a r r ied Nov. 3 , . . D istrict A t ­ to r n e y W. T. PurcB a se Iras p r e ­ sented to th e G r a n d Ju r y th e cases of 14 N e w a rk violators o f th e liquor law , 7 f o r s e lling h a r d cider an d 7 for selling w h iskey a n d gin. TH IR T Y YEARS AGO N e w a rk U n ion-G a z e tte Novem b er i2, 1910 Jo h n A. Dix, D e m o c rat, w a s elected G o v e r n o r by a 66,000 plu r a lity in la s t w e e k ’s election . . . S. H. M o ra an d W. H. Bit'dsall have organized a com p a n y a t C leveland, O., as t h e Mc'ra T ruck Co., capitalized a t $700,000 . . . B o rn to . Mr. an d Mrs. W illiam H e rm a n , Nov. 8, a .'.ni. ;j,nd to Mr. and M rs. A. D. Snyder, a d a u g h ter. FO R T Y YEARS AGO I A rcadian Weekly G a z e tte November 14, 1900 ' ' a “ mi was born to Mr. and M rs. C h a rles G a lusha Nov. 11 . . . M iss E lla Louise Blossom o f P o r t G ibson and R ichard H a r ­ rison A B e rton of N e w a rk w ere m a r r ied here Nov. 8 . . . M iss Rose W illiam s h a s gone into th e insurance business a n d h a s a n office in th e S h e r m a n O p e ra Hoti.se . . . In a double w e d d ing at South B u tler Nov. 11 M iss Mabe! Foster of th a t place was united to C h a rles K elly of New­ a r k and Miss M aude M a rcellus of South B u tier w as wed to Dr. A lbert E. Kelly. -------- : --- O'- ----------- Pigeon, Poultry Fanciers to Hold Joint Area $how S. - Pigeon an d poultry fanciers of u p s tate New Y o rk anckj- th e ir favorite fowl will converge on R o c h e s ter N o v em b er 27 through Dec. 1 for a fivp-day exhibition a t the new ly-renovated Civic E x h ibits Building. F o r th is y e a r th e R o c h e s ter F a n c ie r s A ssociation, w h ich h a s been sponsoring p o u ltry shows for 35 years, an d th e Pigeon F a n c iers A ssociation of: Roches­ ter, have joined forces to pro­ duce a larg e r show in -larger q u a rters. ing m ade out for the scores of classes and prizes in w h ich th e pigeons, chickens, G u inea hens, geese, ducks an d turkeys will be com p e ting, A r th u r O. Schilling, for b e t t e r N ew a jid U S E D K a r l W . K e r m a n 319 W. UNION ST. TEL. 555 1 i\!11- 1 . i . u , - u u i WHEN YOU WEAR YOUR FURS DON’T WORRY INSURE THEM i Protection given against fire, .theft, robbery, hold-up ANYWHERE EASE O F MIND IS LIFE’S GREATEST BLESSING GEO. W. MUTH & SON Old Ljne Stock Companies Lincoln-Alliance Rlfig. Phone 416 Newark’s Oldest Insurance Agency It didn’t take these birds long to drum up one good reason for having a farm telephone--it helps get and keep work. If you, or members of your family, are wqrking outj you need a telephone more than ever. It makes it easy for em­ ployers to get in touch with you when there's work to be done. And after the job is underway, it provides a ready link between you and your work. More job 9 come to you when you hgve a telephone. NEW YORK TELEPHONE COMPANY Family separated? Telephone them Thanksgiving Day, November 21st, when Long Distance rates are reduced all day. PHONE 598 B S L O T T A ’ S A u t o L o a n s Member Federal Reserve System If your present ear is getting you down and you’re thinking of trading it in, let us finance your purchase at low-cost hank rates withva Lincoln-Alliance Auto Loan. Only the rela­ tively inexpensive fire and theft insurance re­ quired; and you may place your insurance where you wish. Inquire! L i n c o l n - A l l i a n c e B a n i t a n d T r u s t C o m p a n y Newark, N. Y. / •

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