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The Chatham Republican. (Chatham, Columbia County, N.Y.) 1886-1918, April 17, 1895, Image 2

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BEESS AND FASHION. DRESSMAKERS ’ STYLES AND TAILOR MADE GARMENTS. The Whole Tendency of Both Bonnets and Gowns Is to Width — Blouse Bodices and Xace Trimmed Sleeves For Summer Dresses — New Tailor Made Suits. The spring fashions are out in full force, making brave show not only in the shop windows, but all places haunt ­ ed by well dressed women — on the prom ­ enade, at church, at the theater. Like the flowers of spring, the styles are many and varied, which is as it ought to be so long as there are capricious women to clothe. There remains not a question hut that the whole tendency is to width. In the first place, the cir ­ cumference of the skirts, which subsid ­ ed with us for a time into a little extra fullness at the back, is in Paris insisted upon,* with wadding, wire and whale ­ bone. New York is not far behind. Some of the latest visiting and after- PARIS WALKING COSTUME. noon toilets have the skirts not only stiffened under the lining, but have as well strips of whalebone sewed in some of the breadths, while two strips encir ­ cle the skirt at the bottom. The early importations also make it appear that conservative women who have been flattering themselves that they could save this country from an influx of the much dreaded crinoline will have to gird themselves afresh for the fray. This tendency to width is accentuated by the sleeves expanding from the elbow and the hats, on which all the trimming is located at each side of the brim. For this' fashion Sarah Bernhardt is partly responsible, as she is for so many va ­ garies in modes and manners. As the Byzantine Gismonda, she wears huge clusters of orchids, which protrude on either side of her head behind the ears. In like manner have her fanciful coun ­ try women elected to dress their heads. The hair is turned back from the fore ­ head in a thousand undulations, which fall over the ears and disappear in a tiny coil or bunch of curls at the back, set rather low on the head. The hats accord with this arrangement of the tresses. I The conservative woman cannot find it in her heart to commend this strange freak of fashion. For a tiny face rising from a tali figure it might make an el ­ ective frame, but the ordinary, diminu ­ tive woman appears more ridiculous than picturesque with these excrescences to right and left of tier. The blouse style of bodice which promises to prevail in thin dresses for summer is a pleasing one and welcome alike to tall and short women. These bodices are, many of them, made on a tight fitting lining and are trimmed with lace and ribbons. That old time favorite Valenciennes lace is revived in both white and cream shades and will be largely employed on all thin gowns. The sleeves of thin gowns are being made up without lining and are render ­ ed elaborate with lace insertions and frills. Blouse waists are furthermore made dressy with a full bertha of lace over the shoulders, the bertha in some instances crossing the waist in front. Bishop sleeves are much used for blouse waists. For heavier materials, such as pique, duck and linens, short coats witta revers, also Norfolk waists, will be worn with plain skirts. In the street the smart Parisian still adheres to a black costume, and this be- linings, which are every day becoming more important. Jackets are lined with the same tone as the petticoat, as just now these are made of richer materials and more elaborately trimmed than dresses. The new materials for tailor coats, to be worn with any and every gown, are heavy tweeds in which several colors are prettily blended, and the cov ­ ert cloths in all the pale shades of tan and gray. They are made quite short, with some fullness in the back. The front may be either single or double breasted an! is finished with the usual revers. The bodices to some of the tailor gowns are cut in a new way with a full front overhanging. These are finished round the waist with a silk band matching the collars, generally made of some brocaded fancy silk. The sleeves are still full, and there is a good deal new in the cut of skirts, which are made plain, with horizontal seams. Cheviots in various mixtures are em ­ ployed for coats and skirts. Coat bodices are made with short basques plaited at the back, the seams strapped, the basques being cut on the round, the col ­ lar turning down like a man ’ s coat. Some tailor dresses have the extreme full skirts, while others are more mod ­ erate in size, but in either case they are short enough to clear the floor. Fancy vests of pique and bright colored vest ­ ing are shown with the new tailor gowns and are very similar to those worn last season. A ucce V arnum . SPRING MILLINERY. An Erratic Juml)Ie of Shapes and Combi ­ nations, Many of Them Becoming. Spring millinery is an erratic jumble of shapes and combinations of materials and colors, with millions of glittering spangles of every hue thrown in for fur ­ ther diversity. But if we avoid the ex ­ aggerated perversions of real millinery art it is a simple matter to find the most charming little bonnets and the most becoming hats imaginable. A special feature of the new milli ­ nery is that the flowers and leaves are mostly very large, the hydrangea being one of the favorite blossoms. Petunia is one of the most popular colors and appears in straw hats as well as flowers and ribbons. The wide effect gained by wings and outspreading bows is still a dominant characteristic of both hats and bonnets, but the broad Dutch bon ­ net, so fashionable all winter, has grown a little point in front, which makes it resemble the Marie Stuart shape and is infinitely more becoming to the major ­ ity of faces. The jet bonnets, with their bunches of bright flowers at either side, are very attractive. Three shades of one flower are usually grouped together, A TAILOK MADE GOWN, coming mode has been followed to some extent in New York, especially during the Lenten season. Tailor gowns of black cloth are very fashionable and, like those of mixed tweeds and light colors, are made with the short, tight fitting coat, which is worn over blouses of lace or soft silk or chemisettes of white batiste, trimmed with rows of cream Valenciennes lace. There are a great many cloths to choose from for tailor made ^ garments, Some of the newest are a thin make of melton, plain and of mixed coloring, in the dominant shades which will be worn this season— namely, brown, green, blue and gray. Several fancy broche silks with floral designs are used with these for. smart blouses and for NEW HATS AND BONNETS. and three feathers also. Fine plaitings of chiffon, with either flowers or feath ­ ers, are arranged from both hats and bonnets to fall on to the hair at the back, and a curtain of lace caught up in the middle is another fancy. A pret ­ ty jet bonnet, with wide spreading wings of jet, is trimmed with cream colored pansies above the ears. Violets and roses are used in combination, and roses in all the unnatural, colors are mingled with the uncommon tints, of the new ribbons, which are lovely with chene figures, and both satin and velvet stripes. The chapeau rond is one of the new hats of the season which has a straight round rim and is very becoming. Vio ­ let colored straw is trimmed with vio ­ lets and green fern. Cavalier hats are trimmed with large roses and bows of glace silk. In fact, there is every shape of hat imaginable, and the straws are so soft and prettily colored that middle aged women will find less trouble than ever in getting a becoming hat. Toques are a' little larger, but they are to be worn as much as ever. Deep yellow straws, trimmed with Valen ­ ciennes lace, will be popular later when the warm days are with us. Another style of hat called the Welsh shape turns up at one side. The new sailor shape is much like the old, except that the rim is crinkled. Iridescent wings are a feature of the bonnets. A pretty confection has a crown of sequin jet embroidery over gold tinsel, iridescent green wings and fan ends of fine French lace, with bunches of pink roses. A butterfly toque of mechlin lace has bows of amethyst ribbon and piquet of tea roses. A small fan of lace falls on the hair, fastened with a brooch. Bows and rosettes are placed on the crown of some hats. Bims are often faced with black kilted chiffon, and it is a relief to know that all hats are to be worn well on the head and perfectly straight, says the New York Sun, authority for the fore ­ going. ■ ___________ Care For Xilies, Azaleas, cinths and Pansies. The custom of using a growing plant as ah Easter gift has become almost univen sal and has largely increased the florists ’ Easter trade. ! Some of the favorites seem difficult to care for, among them the Ber ­ muda or Easter lily. Their culture is said to be easy, provided the plants are not forced. Let the Easter lily bloom until it is through blooming, then take it out of the pot, remove the young shoots and plant the old one in rich soil where it will get both sun and shade. It may, if it has not been forced, bloom all summer. Keep it well watered. Put the young plants into pots and set in a closet or cellar, without wa ­ ter, for the season. In the fall bring out and care for as usual. This makes winter bloomers. In the same way young plants may be kept all the winter in the dark for summer blooming. After azaleas are done blooming, if they look stunted, repot them in well drained pots. Water sparingly until the plant begins to grow, then abundantly. Lessen the supply of water as the new shoots harden. Take into the house if the early fall is wet. Water in the house as little as possible until the plant buds. Then give it lots of water. Syringe the foliage often. Hyacinths are real Easter time plants. When the flowers begin to die, cut off the stalks and stop watering, letting the plant get so dry that the bulbs shrivel in the earth. Lift out old and new bulbs and put away, labeling.with color of flower for -convenience. If for gardens, plant in rich loam in the fall, leaving three inches of earth over bulbs. Cover ground with a mulch of straw, hay or leaves, re ­ moving it when shoots appear. The old bulbs die out in a few years and will not bloom. The young ones ought not to bloom the first year. If so, pinch off buds. For house growing put into pots about January, with water and sun in abun ­ dance. Rich soil, good drainage and plen ­ ty of air and sunlight ought to bring them into blossom for the next Easter. They can also be grown in water in hyacinth glasses. The water is kept sweet by a few bits of charcoal. Keep Easter pansies until May indoors, then set out in a good, well drained soil, in southeast exposure if possible. Hot sun is bad for the pansy; also earth that dries quickly. Sandy loam, mixed with leaf mold and rotten manure, is best. Keep plants well watered. Young plants give larger blooms than old ones. Pansies can be multiplied by pegging down new shoots — that is, fastening them under the earth by a wire or pegs and covering the place with sand. The tops project. When grow ­ ing well separate from old plant. Seeds can be sown in fall for winter blooming and in April for summer blooming. A. I. W. Pastor Methodist Church, Accord, N. Y., Says Cancerous Disease Can he Cured. Eggs In Milk. Cocoa is now much used in the place of chocolate for icing cake. The icing is made by beating the whites of 2 eggs »nd mixing with them nearly a cupful of powdered sugar. Add 2 tablespoonfuls of cocoa. An icing that many prefer is made without any eggs. Boil 4 table- spoonfuls of granulated sugar with the same quantity of water for a minute, then add a teaspoonful of vanilla and 2 teaspoonfuls of cocoa, boil a minute longer, and the icing will he ready to ■use.' ■ ■ A ccord , N. Y — Under the old schorl method it was believed that any disease of cancerous growth could never be cured. The surgeon ’ s knife was resorted to, but the old trouble was sure to break out again. bihce the discovery of Dr. Kennedy ’ s Favorite Remedy, all this has been changed — the action of Favorite Remedy upon the system leaves no trace of poison in the blood, the seeds of disease are expelled and lost health restored. A notable case of the efficacy of Dr. Kennedy ’ s Favorite Remedy is that of the Rev. I.W. Hill of ibis town Some years ago he was suffering with a cancer of long standing, on his lip, and finally concluded to have it removed. In speaking of bis case Pastor Hill said: ‘ Abput three weeks previous to having the operation performed, I purchased Dr. Kennedy ’ s Favorite Remedy and continued taking it for some time gfter the cancer was removed. Ten long years have, pat-sed since then and no trace of the ugly thing has ruturned. I speak with know- ledae in the highest terms of Dr. Kennedy ’ s Favorite Reined} ” as being able to cure the troubles for wnich it is prepared. ” One of our local physicians said, in ex ­ plaining the demand for Dr. Kennedy ’ s Favorite Remedy : “ It acts as a nerve and blood food, and to my knowledge it has made many permanent cures of Nervous Debility, Sleeplessness, Dyspepsia, Rheu ­ matism anti of the sickness peculiar to woman, where other treatments have failed. For headackes,. constiptions and the run down c .ndition. one often suffers with, there is nothing else so good. ” J. Dardess & Son DEALERS IN FEED AND GRAIN. Oranges, Tangerines, Lemons, Ba ­ nanas, Grapes, Cranberries, Celery. Mixed Nuts, Almonds, Brazil Nuts, Pecons and English \Walnuts. Raisins, Currants, Citron, Orange and Lemon Peel, Pigs, Dates, Evapor rated. Apples, Apricots, Raspberries and Blackberries. ANSWER THIS. The largest subscription house in the ctuutry wants a first-class representative for this community for strict ly special work. Short hours. Good pay. Minister, teacher, or wide-awake man or woman given pref ­ erence. Address, stating age and former employment, Globe Bible Publishing Co., 723 Chestnut St.. Philadelphia., Pa. Canned and. Bottle'd Goods, Mince Meat, Boiled Cider, Plum Pudding, Honey and Maple Syrup. J. Dardess & Son Main Street, CHATHAM, N. Y. L. J. POTTER UNDERTAKER CHATHAM, N. Y. How Paris Observes the Day. . In the great Catholic churches a beau ­ tiful old custom is revived. The men of the congregation form a procession during an interval in the mass and with lighted tapess in their right hand move slowly to- | ward the altar, slowly chanting the hymn “ Christ Is Risen. ” . The altar rails are decked with fine cloth and garnished with flowers and greens. Behind them are a number of priests in stately robes, who ad ­ minister the sacrament to the members of the procession as, in' passing, they kneel down on the communion steps. It is a great democratic demonstration, in which the deputy elbows the blouse man and the petty storekeeper fraternizes with..the sen ­ ator. After vespers the “ grande pelecri- nage ” to Montmartre takes place. Hun ­ dreds and thousands of men, women and children toil up the steep streets in solemn procession to worship at the shrine of the Sacred Heart and receive the benediction from the loggia of the Basilica. Emblem of tbe Resurrection. The Easter egg is in Germany a na ­ tional institution, an inheritance from the heathen Teutons, sanctioned by Mar ­ tin Luther, who pronounced the egg “ an emblem of the rising up out of the grave of our Lord Jesus Christ. ” “ In the same manner as the chick, en ­ tombed, as it were, in the egg, is in due time brought to life, so did our Lord arise from the grave to give us life, ’ ’ said the great reformer. Easter Chickens. , “ Oh, what pretty chickens! ” exclaimed Mabel, looking at some whose fluffy feath ­ ers had been dyed different colors. “ Yes, ” explained 7 -year-old Madge. ‘ They were hatched out of Easter eggs.” General or local Ageiffs. $75 Ladies or genta. a week. Exclusive territory. Rapid Dish Washer. Washes alUhe dishes for a family in one minute. Washes, rinses and dries them without wetting the hands. You push the button, the machine does w. p. H AKRISON & CO. the rest. Bright, polished dishes, and cheerful wives. No scalded fingers, nosoiledhandsor clothing. 'No broken dishes, no muss. Cheap, durable,warranted. Circulars free Clerk Ho. 12, Columbus, O. H ires ’ R ootbeer sold in 1894 , which made 15,675,735 gallons, or 313 , 494.700 glasses, suffi ­ cient to give every man, wo ­ man and child in the United States, five glasses each — did you get your share? Be sure and get some this year. A 25 cent package makes 5 gallons. Sold everywhere. HIRES ’ Rootbeer. the CHAS. E. hires CO., Fhila. Half the Money spent for harness and shoes could be saved, if they were treated right. Whether leather lasts or not depends on the care it gets. Vacuum Leather Oil is the care-taker. 25c. worth is a fair trial — and your money back you want it — a swob with each can. For pamphlet, free, -How to T ake C are of L eather , ■ ’ send to VACUUM OIL CO.. Rochester, N. Y. OfficeSpringstein Stanwix Hall. Building:, Opposite Residence — No. 37 Kinderliook Street. I keep on band a fnll assortment of O-A^SIKIIETS., ROBES, &c. Galls answered promptly day or night. EMBALMING A SPECIALTY. Calls may he left at East Chatham wit Palmer & Johnson. L. J. dPOTTIEZR.- We want several honest, reliable men in this vi ­ cinity, to act as SALESMEN for our CHOICE NUR SERF STOCK. We will pay a salary or commission and fur ­ nish an outfit free. Write at once for terms and information to _ ______ THE GUARANTEE NURSERY CO., GENEVA, N. Y. EGiTT-A-LIZ-A-TIOXT T^BLIE = = 1804-^ TOWNS. Ancram ............ Austerlitz' ....... Canaan .............. Chatham... — Claverack ......... Clermont ......... Copake ............ Gallatin — ... - Germantown .. Ghent...... .......... Greenport. ....... Hillsdale ........... Hudson ........... Kinderhook __ Livingston ...... New Lebanon. . Stockport ......... Stuyvesant ....... Tagbkanic..... Assessed Value of Beal Es ­ tate. S 883,506 329,459 1,214,871 2,213,188 1,916,140 570,799 955,432 478,672 579,872 1,587,850 , 669,849 561.075 4,034,270 1,658,208 839,025 512.075 891,750 1,271,585 336,245 S21,448,871 Assessed Value of Personal Estate, s 66,500 11,800 14,525 209,050 150,400 100,750 65,325 16,797 49,050 113,650 70,400 74,750 1,207,170 526,65 59,655 133,600 28,000 182,350 45,563 S3,126,010 Total As- s esse d Value of Beal and Personal Estate. I 949,006 341,259 1,229,396 2,422,238 2,066,540 671,549 1,020,757 495,469 628,922 1,701,500 740,249 635,825 5,241,440 2,184,883 898,680 645,675 919,750 1,399,935 381,808 $24,574,881 Equalized Value of Beal Es ­ tate. f 838,940 343,296 1,306,441 2,404,393 2,439,373 416,082 1,036,361 377,076 699,608 1,520,990 583,300 586.288 3,401,786 1,567,940 1,032,643 561,918 1,104,666 942,352 285,412 $21,448,871 Total Equalized Value of Beal and Personal Estate. S 905,440 355.096 1,320,966 2.613,443 2,589,773 516,832 1,101,686 393,873 748,658 1,634,646 653,700 661,038 4,608,956 2,094,615 1,092.298 695,518 1,132,666 1,124,702 339,975 Am ’ t de ­ ducted from As ­ sessed Val. Beal Estate. $ 43,566 154,717 ' 101,596 66,854 86,549 632,484 90,268 275,233 50,833 $24,574,881' $1,502,100 Amount Added to Assessed Value of Beal Es ­ tate. 13,837 91,570 191,205 523,233 80,929 119,736 25,213 193,618 49,843 212,916 $1,602,100 [Published by autJiority of the Board of Supervisor's.] INCORPORATED COMPANIES. dTATWMPNT of the amount of Tax levied upon the Incorporated Companies located m the County of Columbia, for STATEMENT oiTlm amoimt o^ ^ of the ^ of Hudson. __________________ _ NAME OF COMPANY. Aken Knitting Company. Allen Paper Car Wheel Company. an ____ r . . Ancram Iron Ore Mining ........... Aqueduct Company ........................................... do do . — - ....... ........................ Bradley Chainless Bicycle .............................. Canoe Cotton Mills Company ....................... Chatham Electric Light .................................. Chatham Publishing Co ................................... Chatham Water Works. . . ............................... Columbia Iron Mining. ........................... ........ •Farmers ’ National Bank .................................. First National Bank.. . ........................ . ............ Granger & Gregg Brewing ........................... . do do .................... . ..................... Harder Knitting Company ............................ High Bock Knitting Company ........ • • • - • Hudson and Athens Ferry Co. (Limited).. Hudson City Savings Institution ................ Hudson Iron Company ....................... . .......... do do . .......................................... Hudson Elver Ferry Company ..................... Hudson Biver Ore and Iron Company .... Hudson Biver Spathic Iron Company. .., . Hudson Biver Steamboat Company . .......... Kinderhook Knitting Company ....... . Kinderhook Lake Park Improvement Co. Knickerbocker Ice Company ........... . Livingstbn Paper Company ........................... Miller Knitting Company,. .. . ...................... Millerton Iron Company . . ........ . ............... . . . National Hudson Biver Bank ............. . ..... . do do , do . ...................... National Union Bank. .... . ........................... N. Y. and Hudson Steamboat Co ................ . New Jersey Ice Company ......... ........... Oak Hill Iron Mining Company . .. . . ...... Standard Oil Co. . . ............ . . . . . — . ........ . — State Bank.- ....... •_••••••• .................................... The Hudson Electric Eauway Co.. ...... . The Hudson Light and Power Co ......... Union Knitting Mill Company;. — . . .... . Valatie Knitting Company ............... Van Wyck Paper MiIE ....... ... Wild Manufacturing Company .. . ............ Yonkers City Ice Company ............. • ■ • Town. Claverack ................................ Hudson, 1 st Ward .................. Ancram ................................... Greenport ................................ Hudson, 2d Ward.. .............. Kinderhook ...................... do ............................ Chatham .............................. . Chatham .................................. Ghent.® ..................................... Ancram ....... . .......... . . . ...... Hudson, 3d and 5th Wards.. do 3d Ward — . .......... do 2d and 3d . ............... Claverack ...; ............ ...... Hudson, 5th Ward ......... .. . . . Claverack .......................... • - • Hudson, 1st Ward..-. ........ do 2d and 5th .............. Greenport ................................ Hudson, 1st Ward. — ...... Hudson, 3d Ward ................ Livingston ....... ------- ; .......... Greenport ......... ... Hudson, 1 st Ward __ .- .......... Kinderhook . . .................. — Kinderhook ....................... . . Greenport .............. ...... Livingston ................ v ............ Claverack ....... ........................ Ancram ............ .. ..................... Kinderhook — . ..................... Hudson, 1st Ward .............. . . Stockport. __ V ........ . .Kinderhook . ................. . Hudson, 1st W ard ..... — .. Stuyvesant ............. . ............ . Livingston — ........... Hudson, 1st Ward ....... . ...... - Chatham .............. . . . — ••• Hudson, 3d Ward ............ . .. do 1st Ward.... ....... do 2d Ward — ....... . Kinderhook ............... . Claverack — .... ........ • • •... Kinderhook ...... Stuyvesant ....... . . ..... ........ . Beal. $114,350 00 18,000 00 12,000 00 1,700 00 250 00 6,000 00 20,000 00 4,000 00 25.000 00 13.000 00 43,500 00 32,675 00 2,600 00 . 37,000 00 56,225 00 11,200 00 500 00 75,000 00 121,700 00 6.500 00 7.500 00 4,800 00 10,000 00 8,000 00 2,000 00 22,500 00 12,560 00 21,625 00 15,500 00 6,000 00 33,300 00 16,000 00 2,250 00 5,500 00 21,000 00 11,000 00 27,100 00 8,000 00 10.000 Q0 35.000 00 12.000 00 Personal. $25,000 00 9,000 00 'i'ooo ’ oo' ■-866 66 ' 270.000 00 212.000 00 '35,000 00 10,000 00 5,000 00 5,000 00 4,400 00 7,500 00 235,000 00 228,150 00 50,000 00 89,000 00 18,400 00 Total. $139,850 00 18,000 00 12,000 00 1,700 00 9.250 00 6,000 00 21,000 00 4.000 00 800 00 25.000 00 13.000 00 313,500 00 212,000 00 32,675 00 2,600 00 72.000 00 66,225 00 5.000 00 11,200 00 500 00 75.000 00 5.000 00 121,700 00 6.500 00 7.500 00 9,200 00 10.000 00 8.000 00 2,000 00 22.500 00 , 12,560 00 7.500 00 256,625 00 15.500 00 234,150 00: 33,300 00 16,000 00 2.250 00 5.500 00 50.000 00 21.000 00 100,000 00 45.500 00 8,000 00 10,000 00 35.000 00 12.000 00 Tax. $1,432 35 428 17 131 28 12 74 220 03 46 18 161 64 37 26 7 45 207 SI 142 22 7,457 32 5,042 90 777 25 26 72 1.700 73 680 71 118 93 ■ 266 41 3 75 1,814 03 118 93 1,308 18 48 73 178 81 70 81 76 97 59 07 21 50 231 27 . 136 41 57 74 6,104 41 147 82 1.701 99 792 11 134 66 , 24 19 130 83 465 80 499 53 2,378 71 1,082 31 61 58 102 79 269 40 -101 00 Shoe You Want at a medium price — style enough, for a dress shoe — wear enough to satisfy the most exacting — The price — $3 in style and wear for $2.25. DAVID I j > STARKS, CHATHAM, N. Y. MEAT MARKET. L. O; KRAFFT, DEALEB IN Beef, Veal. Mutton, PORK, LARD, SAUSAGE, HAM, POULTRY, Etc. Main St., - - Chatham, N. Tf $1,000 REWARD. 4 4.1 STATE OF NEW YOBK, S heriff ’ s O ffice , C olumbia C ounty , , H udson , Sept. 27.1894. A reward of One Thousand Dollars will be paid for the arrest and conviction of the -per ­ son or persons who set on fire any building or buildings in the town of New Lebanon during the last six months. This offer expires by limitation in one year from date, and all liability under it shall then cease, and if the amount is paid in any one case, then^this offer shall be null and void as to any subsequent conviction. MATTHEW CONNEB, Sheriff of Columbia County. The National Board of Fire Underwriters have offered a further reward of five hun ­ dred dollars for arrest and conviction for tbe same offence. 5tf DIRECTIONS for using CREAM BALM. Apply a particle of! the Balm well upl into the nostrils.! After a m o m e n tl draw strong breath! through the nose.l Use three times a! day, after meals pre-| ferred, and beforej retiring. C atabr H WEM BN*x! co\ WFEVERi E ly ’ s C ream B alm opens and cleanses the Nasal Passages, •AlTaysPain and ‘ in-^|^y flammation. Heals!- - _ , . the Sores, Protects the Membrane from Colds, Bestores the Sense of Taste and Smell. The Balm is quickly absorbed and gives relief at once. Price 50 cents at Druggists or by mail. ELY BBOTHEBS. 56 Warren St.. New York. For Breakfast prepared from California White Wheat. De- lieious. Economical. Grocers sell it. The John T. Cutting Co., 153 Duane St., N. Y. 27-30 WANTED — A FEW MORE BOOK AGENTS in this and adjoining Counties for OUR JODRHEY SRODHD THE WORLD. A bran ’ new book by REV. FRANCIS E. CLARK. Pres ’ t of the United Soc. of Christian Endeavor. The best chance to make money ever offered to all who want profitable work. A good Agent in this vicinity can earn;$100 a month. ^ “ Distance no hindrance, for TFe Pay Freight. Give Credit, Premium Copies, Free Outfit, and Exclusive Territory. For Particulars, write to A. D. WORTHINGTON & CO., Hartford Conn. 23-27 Finest Roadbed on tbe Continent Six Magnificent Express Trains Daily CHICAGO, AND THE WE ST, SOUTHWEST, NORTHWEST. *Ss Palace Sleeping Cars on all night trains • _ . and Drawing Room Cars on day trains.; -- For folders, Reservations in sleeping -; cars, tickets, or information of any kind, ’ : 4 / call' on . ' . F. E. PETTINGILL. Agent, Chatham, SILL, , : J , N. V. - ■' A. S. HANSON, , Gen ’ l Pass. Agt, Boston, Mass.

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