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Binghamton courier. (Binghamton, N.Y.) 1844-1849, March 13, 1845, Image 1

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E JEERY THCRSDAY J fW O D O L L A R S A Y E A R , IN'ADVANCE. O ^ b i hi J . n t b r i 6 & $ ’B d tislorer •CJiMfSa t • * •••' ' • *. • ’ \ , •• ' ■• \•■ ’ - RA T E S O F A P Y E R T ISIN G . O n e s q u tiaqqe we*k, - - — - : 1 “ .3 “ - - - * 1 year, H a lf column 1 ye»r. Whole col,umn I year,( — . — — Professional Cards not exceeding lO lines, Legal advertisements at the rates allowed bylaw. ^^1 I*1’ - — - . ' 1 -■■■—!■ I '■ ’I1 - ... . .. —» M O R T G AGE SALE.—M ortgagors, Mathusa- lem Hasbrouck and M ary h is w ife; Mortga­ gee, Samuel H asbrouck; Mortgage, dated F ebrua­ ry 15.18-10—recorded in Broome county clerks of- ■fice in Book of Mortgage No. 9, page 93 &c; A- m ount claimed to be due a t the first publication of this notice, $2,701,94; Description of Mortgaged* premises, as contained in said mortgage. “ A ll that r,' certain piece o r parcel o f land lying and being in i the county of Broome in the state aforesaid, on the east side o fthe Chenango river, and being the prem- ^ises now owned and occupied, by the said party of the first p art, (the said Mortgagors,) Beginning at a* Stake standing on the bank of the Chenango :iv- ■ er,lienee north 89 degrees 15 minutes east.24 chains £0 links to a stake standing on the west side o f the road that leads from Binghamton up the river, ' thence south 8 degrees 45 minutes west 2 chains 19 \ -links to a stake standing by the said road, thence south ,89 degrees 15 minutes west to a stakestanding on the bank ofsaid river, thence up said river to the place of begin n ing. Also one other piece or •'parcel ofland Jying on the east side of the aforesaid reload, beginningata stake, thence north 12 degrees , east 6 chains and 78 links, thence north 89 degrees 15 minutes east 5 chains and 90 links to a swamp, thence to the place of beginning, containing in the \whole seven acres. Also that other piece or parcel - o ld and, bounded as follows; Beginning at a stake • •stanclingat the northeast bounds of those lots form­ erly belonging to Abraham Du Bois Jun. deceased ''■on the west side of the road that leads from Bing­ ham ton up the said river, thence running south 89 •degrees 15 minutes west 24 chains 75 links, to the ynOhenango river, thence up along said river as it , winds and turns twenty three chains and fifteen ’ links to a stake and stones standing two rods from th e c e n t r e o f the highwa\% then c e a l o n g the h i g h ­ way south 8 degrees and'30 minutes west 8 chains v and \9.0 links to the p l a c e o f beginning, c o n t a i n i n g ^.fifteen acres an d a half, be t h e same more or less. Also all ihat certain lot piece or parcel ofland k n o w n k disting u i s h e d by being the southerly p a r t . of lot no. 5 as laid down on a map by Charles Clin- -ton in the town o f Chenango and county o f Broome, r to Wit: Beginning at the north west corner of no. 4, ♦hence easterly a l o n g said line no. 4. 42 chains and 50 links to the north east corner of no. 4, th e n c e a l o n g t h e east l i n e o f no. 5 n o r t h e r l y 25 ' c h a i n s ancl 50 links, tkenee w e s t e r l y to a brook, join- i inglands of Samuel Bevier, thence southerly and . .westerjy following the course ofthe brook to the easterly line ofsa d lot, thence along the westerly line o f said lot io the place of begin n irg, containing Ninety acres of Laud; Excepting h twever one hair* - a c r e h e r e t o f o r e sold to Byron and Stephen Bunnell, and. excepting also one quartet’ of an acre ot Land ..heretofore sold to Asahel Fairchild.” Said mort­ gage will be foreclosed by a sale of the said mort­ g a g e d premises, at public auction at the Phenix H o t e l in B i n g h a m t o n , on the Kith day o f M a i next, at 10 o’clock A. M. Dated February 20th i845. D .S & J .R . DICKINSON, Ati’ys * 48 tds for Mortgagee. O R T G A G E S A L E . — M o r t g a g o r J o s i a h W e s t M Mortgagee Aunni Doubleday, Mor gage da­ ted the 8 th. dav of April A. D. 1835 —Recorded in . Boome county Clerks office April 13, 1835 at 9 A. M . in Book of mortgages No 6 , pages 433 and 434 Amount claimed to be due at the first publication of this notice twenty-eight dollars, amount to be­ c o m e due o n e hundred dollars with interest from the eighth day of April 18-44. Description o f mort­ gaged pr.-raises, \ A l l that parcel ofland this day cjn vcyecl to said W e st by Dimick and Sandford at request o fsaid Doubleday aud for the purchase mo­ ney of which this mortgage is executed — described as fellows, beginning at the northeast corner of lot No- osrc hundred and sixteen (116) in the Grand di­ vision o fthe Boston purchase, thence running son h H) degrees -10 seconds, west along a line of marks twenty-nine chains and twenty-nine links to a stake and stones six links west of a hemlock tree; thence south fifteen minutes cast seven chains and fifty two links to a stake and stones near a white maple tree; thence north 89 degrees 45 minutes east, twenty-n ine chains and twenty-nine links to a small sugar-ma- p!em arked; thence north fifteen seconds weston ihe east line o fthe lot, seven chains, and fifty two links to the place of b eginning containing twenty- two acres more or less.” Said mortgage is a'-eom- “Equal Protection to all Classes.”— J a m e s K. P o l k . VOL. VI. NO. 5 1 ] BINGHAMTON, N. Y., THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1845, [WHOLE NO. 703. S H E R IFF’S S ALE?—By virtue o f one execution issued out ol'the .Clerks Office of ♦he pounty of Broome, and to me directed and delivered, against the goods and chattels lands and tenements oi* Augustus Taylor in ray bailiwick, I have levied on and shall exposc for sale at? public auc­ tion as the law d irects, a t the Phenix Hotel now kept and occupied by Isaac B. Gere in the village of Binghamton, County of Broqme and state of N. York on S aturdaythe 5th day of A p ril next, in the year oi o u r lord, one thousand eight hu n dred and forty five, a t 10 o’clock in the forenoon of that day,, all the right, title, interest, claim and demand ofthe said Augustus Taylor, o f in and to the following described premises, to w it:’' All the following pie­ ces or parcels o fland lvingand being in the toWn of Union and county o f Broome and State o f New York, and described as follows:—Thirteen acres and a h alf o f land, the same heretofore set off and awarded to said Augustus-Taylor by tlie court of Chancery in a partition suit, being p art of the farm formerly owned by-Josiah Taylor deceased, excep­ ting a small piece heretofore sold by said, Augustus Taylor from the above mentioned thirteen and a half acres, called in said partition Lot No. (2) two, to Chester M aren;, said small piece heretofore sold, lying on the highway. And for a more par­ ticular description of said thirteen acres and a h a lf and the Lot No. 2 or the small piece hereby excep­ ted as having been sold to Chester Marene, refer­ ence is had to the decree of partition by the court of Chancery between Augustus Taylor and the other heirs at law of Josiah Taylor h is deceased father, and to the deed given by Augustus Taylor to Ches­ ter Marene. Also, all that piece or parcel ofland in the town of Union aforesaid, heretotore purcha­ sed by Augustus T aylor of said Cliesier Marene, beiDg about three a n d a h a lf a c res of land from Lot No. one (1) which was by said decree set off to Chester M arene one o f the heirs at law of the said Josiah Taylor deceased: the two pieces of land above described containing seven teen acres o f land. Also, all the right title and interest in remainder or reversion that said Augustus Taylor now has at law or in equity to Lot No. four (4) in the division of said farm of the late Josiah Taylor deceased, which is now held as right of dower by the mother of the said Augustus Taylor. Together with all and singular the appurtenances and hereditaments to the above d e s c ribed .parcels of land severally belonging or in any wise appertaining.—Dated at Binghamton this 19th day of F ebruary in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty five. 48 JOSEPH BA R T L E T T , Sheriff. S years w ill the annual interest and in default thereof shall be rea­ dy and offer to convey the premises this da Vconvcy- ed to s a id W est by Dimmick ancl Sandford, so as to givo said Doubleday the same title without tost id him.” Said mortgaged premises will be sold at public auction on the 28th day of A pril next at 12 o’clock at noon at the Court House in Bingham­ ton in the county o f Broome. Dated Jan. 27th 18-45. ' JNO. H. H. P A R K , A i t'. A . D OCBLBDAY, Mortgagee. -45 M' ORTGAGE SALE.-— I Mortgagor \Willard Bowker’Jr., Mortgagee Robert Riley; As­ signee of mortgage James M. CafFerty. Descrip­ tion ol mortgaged premises, “ All hat.eerlain piece ofland s ituatein Union,parcel of Hooper’s Patent, and known as lot number thirteen (13) Poor’s loca­ tion, so called.” Mortgage dated 8 th February A. D . 1843, conditioned to pay one hundred and seven­ ty dollars, recorded in \Broome county book of mortgages number 10 pages 429 and 430, Feb. 9, 1813 at 4 P . M. Amount claimed to be due at the date of this notice in default of certain payments ■ therein mentioned, $42 88 ; amount to become due hereafter, $110 with interest. Said mortgaged premises will be sold by v irtue of a power o f sale contained in said mortgage, at public auction tothe highest bidder, at the house of George W . Merse- reau in Union.’ on Friday the 28th day of F ebruary nextat 1 o’clock P- M.—Dated Dec. 4, 1844. 37 JAM E S M. C A F F E R T Y , Assignee. P o s t p o n e m k n ’t . — T h e a b o v e sale is postponed until Saturday the l5lh of March next, then to be held a tthe same place and hour ofthe day, as above named. Dated Feb. 18. 1S45. -48 JAM E S M. C A F F E R T Y , Assignee S H E R I F F ’S S A L E . — By virtue oTone execution issued out o fthe Court of Common P leas of the tounty of Broom:, and to me directed and deliver­ ed, against the goods ancl chattels, lands and tene­ ment* ofLesterLeadbetter and Pamela Scoville, in ’m y bailiwick, I have levied on and shall expose to sale a t public auction as the law directs, a t the Phenix h o ternow kept and occupied by Isaac B. G e re in the village of Binghamton, County of Broome and Stale o f N. York, on Saturday the 12 th •day of April, in the year ot our Lord one thou­ sand eight hundred and forty five, at 10 o’clock in the forenoon of that day, all the right, title, interest, •elaim and demand of tbe said Lester Leadbetter tmd Pamela Scoville of in and to the following de <scribed premises to wit:—All that certain pie :e or .parcel o fland, situate lying and being in the town o f Union, in the county of Broome and State of N. York, being a p^rt o f Lot No. seventy nine (79) in She Nanticoke Township in the Boston purchase \The said piece o r parcel ofland intended to be de :scrlhedis situated in tbe north east corner of said Lot No. seventy nine (79); commencing atth e liorth east corner o f said-lot No. seventy nine, thenye running forty rads south, thence running west on a line p arallel with the n orth line OFsaid lot so far as to include twenty eight acres o fland; together with all and singular the hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in any w ise -appertaining—Also, all that certain piece or parcel of land 1 ving in the town of Union, County . o f Broome and State of New York, being fifty acres ■undivided in lot No- seventy nine-(79) in the Town- ship of Nanticoke in the Massachusetts ten Town- * ships, so called. Dated a t Binghamton this 24ih •day ol F ebruary, in the y ear o f o u r Lord one thou- ,sand eight hundred and forty five. 49 JO S E P H B A R T L E T T , Sheriff. JJM IN JST R A T O R S N O T IC E —Iri pursu- -ance o f an Qrder ol John R. Dickinsou, Sur­ rogate of the County of Broome, notice is hereby \gfveh to’alf persons having claims against Samuel - 3WL H inckley, late of Chenango in said Countjrde- ceased. to present the same with the vouchers H E R IFF’S SALE,—By virtue of one execu­ tion issued out o f the Court o f Common Pleas of the county of Broome, and fo me directed and delivered, against the goods and chatties lands and tenements of John Luscomb in my bailwjek, I have levied on and shall expose for sale at public auction as the law directs, at the store of John Pe- iers,jr.,inthe town of Sanford, county of Broome, and state of New-York, on Saturday the 12th day of April, in the year of our Lord, one thou­ sand eight hundred and forty-five, at 9 o’clock in tbe forenoon o f that day, all the right, title, interest, claim and demand o f the said John Luscomb o f in and to the following described premises, to wit. All that certain piece or parcel of Land being part of Lot No. 11—in the Fisher & Norton Patent agreeable to survey made by 'Wm. McClure—Be­ ginning at the north-east corner of said Lot No. 11, and running from thence north 87 degrees, west twenty-seven chains and six;y links, thence south three degrees, west twenty-five chains and twenty- five links, thence south eighty-seven degrees and twenty-seven chains and sixty links, thence north three degrees, east twenty-five chains and twenty- five links to the place of beginning, containing six­ ty-nine aqves and .rixty-e.igit hundredths 91 an acre, be tbe sasiemore\orless reservingfive acres sold to Pinney in the south-east corner; together with all and singular the. hereditaments and appur­ tenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appur- tcining. Also, all that certain piece or parcel of and lying- and being in the south-east quarter of the\ township of W arren, now Broome county and state of New-York, being part o f Lot No. eleven in said quarter township, and is bpunded as follows: North and west by the lines of said lot number elev­ en, east by lands sold to James P. Aplington, and south by land conveyed to W m . Tappan by the said parties o f the first part—containing forty acres and one-third of an acre of land, be the same more or less: together with all attd singular the heredita­ ments and appurtenances thereunto belonging orin anv wise appertaining.—Dated at Binghamton, this 19ih day of February-, in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and forty-five. JO S E P H B A R T L E T T , Sheriff. By J ames P emander , Deputy. 48 S h : is H E R IFF’S SALE.—By virtue of one execution s uecl out of the Court of Common Pleas of the county of Broome-, and to me directed and de­ livered, against the goods and chattels lands and tenements- of John M. Whitcomb, in my bailiwick, I have levied on and shall expose forsale at public auction as tlie law directs, at the Phenix Hotel ti’ow kept and occupied by Isaac B. Gere in the village of Binghamton, county of Broome and state of N. York on Saturday the 29th day of-March-, in the year of our lord, one thousand eight hundred and forty five, at 9 o’clock in tlie forenoon of that day, all the right, title, interest, claim and demand of the said John M. W hitcomb ofin and to the follow­ ing described premises, to wit. All that certain piece or parcel o f land situate in the Grand Divi­ sion of the Boston purchase so called in the town 0 / Union county of Broome and State o f N. York, known as part of lot number one hundred and nine in said Grand Division and described as follows, Beginning at the north east corner of said lot,thence west on the north line of the lot fifty three chains, thence south on a.tine parallel with the east line of the lot nineteen chains, thence east in a line paral­ lel with the north line to the east line of the lot, thence to the place of Beginning containing one hundred acres and seven-tenihs of an acre ofland together w ith the saw m ill and alt the buildings on saidpremises. Also one piece o f land situate in the Grand division aloresaid being a pavtof lot number one h u n d r e d and thirty two and described as fol­ low?, Viz, Beginning on the original south l i n e of said lot N o . 132 a t a stake a n d stone s t a n d i n g a l e w rods north east of the aforesaid saw mill, thence north fifty degrees and fifty minutes, west four chains and thirty one links to a hemlock tree m ark­ ed, thence north eleven degrees and thirty minutes, West two chains and fifteen links to a beech tree marked, thence north twenty five degrees forty five minutes, west one chain and seventy three links, thence north thirty ninedegrees and thirty minutes, west two chains and forty Units to a hemlock tree marked, thence south filty one degrees, west six chains and sixty five links 10 a beech sapling, thence south thirty one degrees, east five chains and forty links to the said original south lino, thence easterly on said line to the place o f Beginning, Estimated to contain four acres ofland . be the same more or less; together with all and singular the heredita­ ments and appurtenances to each of the above de­ scribed parcels of land belonging, or in any wise appertaining. Dated at Binghamton this 11 th day of February, in the year o f our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty five. 47 JOSEPH BARTLETT, Sheriff. From the Louisville Journal. The Dark Yazoo—an Indian Legend, Aik—“Lucy Neal.” Oh deep within the “ sunny South,” There rolls a'quiet stream ; Its waves go singing on their way, As in a pleasant dream ; The grass is green upon its shore, Bright blossoms mingle there; And music’s soft bewitching spell Is laid upon the air. 0 ! the dark Yazott, O! the dark Yazoo, There’s beauty on thy heaving ware, As the soft zephyrs woo. The wild deer from his covert hies, To quaff its sparkling wave; And there the swans at heat of noon, Their snowy bosoms lave; For well they know, whilst they are there, No javelin will be hurled; ’Tis there forbid, the Indian tells, By hini who rules the world. O! the dark Yazoo, &c. It was a joyous morn in May, When all was calm and still, Save passing breeze or voice.,*! bird, O r sound of d i s t a n t r ill— A deer came bounding to the stream, A red chief on its track, Drawrn waR his bow, when rose a voice, T o w a r n his footsteps b a c k . 01 the dark Yazoo, &c. Retreat, it cried, thou know’st the spot Must have no bloody dye, T h a t h e r e th y bow m u s t n e v e r s o u n d , N o r f a tal arro w fly. The chieftain heard, but still press’d 011 , Quick flctv his arrow dread; But as it left his yielding bow, H i s sp ir it w ith it fled. O ! the dark Yazoo, &c. The long hours of the night came on, Bright rose his wigwarn flame, A n d ea g e r w a ited w ife an d ch ild ; But still no chieftain came. And though long years they waited thus, Alas ’twas all in vain ; * Vain was tlieir search, and vain their tears, He ne’er returned again. O ! the dark Yazoo, & c . I on . Philosophy for the Times. L e t th o s e w h o w ill, r e p in e a t fate, A n d droop tlieir h e a d s w ith sorrow ; I laugh when cares upon me wait— I know they’ll leave to-morrow. My purse is lig h t, b u t w h a t o f . t h a t ? My h e a r t is lig h t In m a tch it; And if I tear my inly coat, I laugh the while I patch it, ” I’ve seen some elves, who call themselves My friends in summer weather, Blown far away in sorrow’s day, As winds would blow a feather. I n e v e r griev e d to see th e m go, (The rascals, who would heed ’em ?) For what’s the use of having friends, If false when most you need ’em. I’ve seen some rich in worldly gear, Eternally repining; Their h e a r t’s a prey to every f e a r ; With gladness never shining. o e» 1 would not change my lightsome heart, F o r all th e ir gold an d sorrow ; F o r t h a t ’s a th in g th a t all th e ir w e a lth Can neither buy nor borrow. And still, as sorrow comes to me, (As sorrow sometimes will come,) I find th e w a y to m a k e th e m flee, In bidding them light welcome. They cannot brook a cheerful look; They’re used lo sobs and sighing; And he that m e e ts them with a smile, Is sure to set them flying. R a i s i n (S* t h e W i n d .— During: the bustle w h ic h prevailed at A ln w ic k fair, N o r t h u m b e r ­ land, lately, a fellow h ad the c o u ra g e to try. the tem p e r o f lh t£ m u ltitude b y a n e w strategem for raising th e w ind. H i s s h o w - b o a rd ’vvas in scribed wiih the following intim a tion:— ‘‘W o n d e r f u lly curiosities of nealu r e : you m a y see a live heer, the most.yvo&derfullest c h eiree-coloured cat from Shropshire And the slupenduous rose-coloured pigeon from the W e s t of E n g la n d . A ls o secrets worth noing, by the proprietor. All for two pence.” Such prodigies, and at such a price, could not fail o f attracting a c ro w d o f spectators, w h o on thei.‘ admittance, were gravely s h o w n a b la c k cat sRjd a while p igeon : th e y then very naturally slewed at e a c h o th er, w h e n the exhib- ( ^ 1 -jf * *% itor, tr u s t m g jo their g o o d hum o r, very confi­ dently addi^bed them — “ Naovv, ladies and gernmen, I teSve p erformed m y promise we’ qe — for y o u m iist no as h a o w , there be b la c k c h e r ­ ries a n d t h e r j be w h ite roases, a n d s u c h be the colors o f m y c a t a n d pigen. I h a v e s h o w n you moreover, a Whole tent full 0 ’ people not half so wise a s th e y ^ h i n k for, but w iser n o w than when they c a m e in • and n a o w (pulling o ffhis h at) I hopes y o u wi 1 keep m y secret a n d not m a k e o- ther folks outside a s w ise as yourself, until they ha’ paid for it as y o u . N o w , my secret, is, that* you h a v e relieved a poor fellow at a trifling cost that must ha 1 gone to bed suppeiless, with his wife and c h ildren, if y o u had\ n o t ; and I’m sure you a r e too g o o d naturerl to be ang r y tvd mo for that.” Efonest J o h n B u ll and his family did not disappoint h im, for e a c h successive com p a ­ ny w en t a way in good h u m o r, leaving others to e n jo y the w o n d e r at the s a m e expense, and keep the secret in turn for their ow n sake.— [B e rw ic k W a rd e r. R o b b i n g a n E d i t o r . —rThe editor o f the Spirit of L ib e rty, A lleghany. C ity, P a .4 gives a n account o f his h a v in g been, robbed last w e e k b y som e adroit rascal, w h o entered his sleeping room, took the clothes he had been w e a ring from the chair on w h ic h they hung, carried them -d o w n stairs, took from Ihe, pockets a s m a ll sum o f m o n ey , c a rried off s o m e flour a n d can­ dles from a p a n try, &c., & c .}, w ithout causing any d isturbance in the house. T h e loser re­ m a rk s, “ F o r tu n a te ly b e in g a n editor we had not m u c h to lose.” T h i s is contentment. It w ould have been unfortunate to lose more, certainly, but rather fortunate to h a v e h ad m o re to lose. R e v . C a l v i n F a i r b a n k — S e n t e n c e f o b N e g r o S t e a l i n g . — T h e R e v . M r . F a i r b a n k , charged in connection with Miss Webster, al­ ready convicted, with a b d u cting slaves in Ken- u f G lucky, was put u p o n his trial, a t Lexington, on the 13th insU H e at first plead not g u ilty, but after a j u r y h a d been sworn, h e entered d plea of g u ilty, a n c f ih re w h im se lf on the m e ic y o f th e court. H e rnade a short address, in which he avowed himself an Abolitionist; but plead the force ot education to’ p alliate the e n o rm ity o f his offence, which h e d e clared was m o re plain lo him on reflection than heretofore. H e said, th at were h e a g a in free, he would n e ither c o u n te n ­ ance n o r aid the escape o f slaves, since he was convinced that a lthough the condition of some m ig h t be ameliorated, m a n y w e re happy as they are, and=that such a course only tended to increase the m isery and discontent of those who were left behind. T h e j u r y after retiring for about a half an houi returned into Court, with a verdict o f g u i l t y ; and fixed his im p risonm e n t at five years upon each indictment (fifteen years in all) in the Penitentiary.—[N. Y. Plebeian. B o y s d o y o u h e a r t h a t ! — A man seldom rises to distinction till h e is m a rried. In the O h.io S en ate there a r e o n ly three ‘s in g le ’ m en, and 34'm a rr ie d m e n . In the H o u s e of R e p re s e n ta ­ tives, there a te five ‘single,’ o n e ‘e n g a g e d ,’ and 6 S m arried. One p f th e b a c h e lo rs is from P i c k ­ way, and a n o th er lives, v e ry p ro p e rly, in G u k rettsville. R H . Rose, o f S ilver L a k e , P a ., keeps 10.- 000 S h eep. H e sold, recently, at o n e lime, 3,- 000 b ales of W o o l, e a c h bale w e ig h in g from 1.50 to 2 8 0 pounds. T h e price was 31 cents. - M o v e m e n t s o e t k I C J e w s . — T h e influx of Jew s to tho H o ly Land has been very g re a t ol late. T h e r e is n o m o re room in J e ru s a le m for th e m ; th e y have a l r e a d y spread over a part of the T u i kish quarter. Joffa h as been selected by them forthe e stablishment o f a Joshiba, and sev­ eral rabbis h av e been appointed for that purpose. M a n y n e w com e rs h a v e settled at Jaffa and o th ­ er p laces a lo n g the c o a s t.' I n d i a n S k e l e t o n . — A letter from a gentle­ man in Plymouth to afrie’pd in this city, dated 20th, says: “A skeleton of an Indian was dug out to day by the laborers on the railroad, be­ tween Plym o u th and Kingston. It was very large', apparently seven feet, in good preserva­ tion, with a siring of beads about the neck, and bow and arrows by its side,”— [Boston Post. A C o u r a g e o u s F a t h i e r . — T h e Hartford T im e s relates a case of w o nd erful risk and c o u r ­ age on the p a r t o f i h e father. A little bov, the son of a fireman.at one of the R h o m n e y furnaces was p la y in g about the rails, when his foot slip- ;d, ar.d he fell into the furnace! H is father with m o re affection than prudence, immediately sprang in after him, in the h o pe to save hischifd and s trange to say, h e was quick enough, to catch a n d throw' him out, but too late, h o w ev er, for the boy almost instantly died. T h e father had n o w e x c h a n g e d situations w ith his child and lound the g reatest difficulty In e x tricating him ­ self from his perilous position, which he wa9 0 - bliged to do by c a 'c h in g hold of a n iron bar, lit­ tle less than red hot, anti s w in g in g him se lf out, but as soon as h e had d o n e so h e was senseless. The poor fellow was carried home in a danger­ ous and u n ce rtain state. ^th e r e o f , to the undersigned, at the house of Mrs. ’ Eunice 1 Hinckley, in Chenango aforesaid, on. or efcefore th e 14th day of June next. Dated Dec. 10 , 11844. i t E L K A N A II HINCKLEY, - 38-6m Administrator. , . , ;; T H E C A M P A I G N . OR .1845 has commenced, and Cary & Co. are pff hand With a large lot o f Goods and, a re receiv­ ing lrom New-York weekly- supplies which they ape now'selling a t y efy low prices. Call and see. Jan. 1. 1845. & -C A R Y & C Q . S H E R IFF’S SALE.—By virtue o f oneexecution. issued out oftlie clerk’s office of the county of Bro<?me and to me directed and delivered, against the goods and chatties lands and tenements o f Dan­ iel Purdy, I have levied on and shall expose for sale at public auction as the law directs, at the house now kept and occupied by Isaac B. Gere in the village of Binghamton, counLy of Broome and State of New York, on Saturdaythe 22d day of February A. D. 1845, a t 10 o’clock in the forenoon of that day,—All the right title interest claim or demand of the said D aniel Purdy?> o f in and to tbe to!lowing described premises to w it: being eighty \ acres, p a rt o f g reat lot'No. seven in the north di­ vision of fourth tract in. Sidney, in the county of Broome, being the same premises on which the said D aniel.Pordy now resides, together with ail and singular the heradTtaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or' in any wise appertaining. Dated, at B inghamton this 9th- day of J a n u a ry A . D .1845-- - » 42 JO S E P H B A R T L E T T , Sheriff. P o s t p o n e m e n t,— The sale ofthe above described premises is hereby-postponed until .Monday the* 12th day of May, 1845, at the samer place and rime o f day asabove: mentioned.' - '■<* *- 49 *. JO S E P H B A R T JUETT, Sheriff, M i l l e r E x c i t e m e n t i n M a 4 n r. — W e learn that s o m e th ii ty c itjzensofO rr in g to n , Me., have b e c o m e so mui-h excited with the advent theories of “ F a t h e r M iller.” as lo n e g le c t all bu­ siness a n d to live u p o n their substance b y s e lling stock from their farms and the furniture from their d w ellings. T h e y h a v e set the twenty-third of n ex t m o n th as the d a y w h e n the w o rld will be destroyed and they will b e c a u g h t-up in the a ir to meet their L o rd . T h e Selectmen o f O r rington h a v e g iv e n p u b ­ lic notice, by hand-bills, that several persons named a r e to be p u t u n d e r g u a rd ia n s h ip , a n d all persons a re cautioned a g a in st purchasing any property, real-’b ^ e r s o n a l . o f th em, as a ll con­ tracts o r deeds>wifl be null and void on a c c o u n t of th e ir incompetency to m a n a g e their a f f a i r .— T h e n u m b e r o f th ese believers is increasing in O r r in g to n ; a n d all seem to f o llow the lead o ' se.llingbut a ll.they possess to s u p p ly immediate wants, a h d to leave the future uncared for.— [B a n g o r W h i g . T h e W o o l G r o w i n g B u s i n e s s . — O u r r e a ­ ders. c a n n o t h a v e forgotten that- the w h ig p re s ­ ses in the n o rthern sections o f o u r c o u n try w e re unanim o u s in d e c la ring that if M r: P o l k g o t e- lected, th e wool g r o w in g b u isncss w o n ld be en -tirely ,ruined. Mr.. P o l k h a s been elected, bu this result instead o f d e p re c ia ting the v a lu e 0 sheep seem s to h a v e p ro d u ced/an effect d ireetli the reverse. A s a l e i o f a f l o c k o f th o r o u g h b r a Saxony sheep was recently m ad e a t Medina, O hio ; b u c k s from . $ 10 \ to $ 5 0 each, a n d the ewes. from ;$ 5 t o $ 3 0 . It. isestim a te d that.$ 7 4, 000 ; w o rth o f sheep h av e h een ta k e n to th e W a s ­ tern S tales th e past season/— [ T r o y B u d g e t; T h e R o b b e r y o f t h e W h i t e h a l l M a i l 1 lias the (olloi.vipg addition­ al p a rticulars: “A num b e r of men w e re im m e d ia te ly de­ spatched u p the road* to s e a rc h for the micsing m a if a n d the robbers. T h e mail b a g w as found in a lot, a short d istance n o rth of the P a tr o o n ’s Mansion. T h e P o stm a s te r informs us that the following p a c k a g e s o f letters w e re found u n o p e n ­ ed : — W h itehall and S a n d y Hill, d e livery and distribution; G le n ’s F a l l s for distribution; K in g s b u r y to T h o r n Apple, M ic h ig a n . T b e following p a c k a g e s were opened, but do n o t a p pear to have contained anything of v a l u e : G le n ’s F a ll s to A l b a n y ; K in g s b u r y to Cold Spring, Whitestovvn to Oswego. “T h e robbers, whoever they were, d r e w a blank. M o n d a y ’s m ail from the north is the lighest o f th e week, a n d we believe thatnolhing of v alue is m issed from tbe o n e received last night. *\P. S. W e learn from the Postm a s te r ’that the S a n d y Hill p a c k a g e for distribution h as just been recovered. It was found on the east side ol the T r o y road, a n d n e a r the C a n a l b ridge.— All the letters had been torn open. O n e o fthem contained a certificate of desposit on the Canal B a n k o f A lb a n y , in favor o f E d g a r C. Dibble, Batavia, whicli is safe. T h e other Tetters in the p a c k a g e all a p p e a r to h a v e been single.” S o m e t h i n g f o r t h e C h i l d r e n .— Mr. G o u g h tells a n anecdote o’f a little g irl d o w n east who was very m u c h e n g a g e d in the tem p e ra n c e cause, but who at the sam e time had rathe ’1 more zeal than wisdom. H e r father and m o th ­ er, and b ro th ers and sisters, had all signed the dedge, a n d she d id n ’t k n o w w h o in the world get next. O n e d ay h e r ftiother was doing some w o rk about the house, w h e n tbe little g irl c a m e in, p u ffing and b lo w in g , w ith the old cat under her aim. “Why. what in the world are you g o in g to do with that c a t? ” asked h e r m o ­ ther. ‘•I’m.fgoing to m ake her sign the pledge, m o th e r. W e ’re all tee totallers notv but her, and she’s got to bo one too.” So saying, she aid the p ledge on the table, p u ta -p e n in the cat’s jaw, and g u id ed it so as to m a k e m a r k s that ooked like “ P « s 5 .” T h e n she let the c a t go, and went out in tne yard to play. T h e next day h e r m o th er found her h o ld in g poor puss with o n e hand, a n d b o x in g h e r e a rs a t a terrible ate‘with the other. “ W h y , w h a t a r e y o u w h ip p in g the cat sofor?’ she asked. “ C a u s e she’s b ro k e h e r pledge, mother.” ' “ B r o k e n her pledge, child— h o w can that be?” “ W e ll, I d o n ’t k n o w h o w it h ap p en ed , m o th ­ er, b u t s h e certainly has broke it— for I ju st s a w her corning out of Mr. J o n e ’s g ro c e ry , lickin g her chops !\— [ B ro o k ly n E a g le . C h u r c h a n d S t a t e — A t the last election in C a n a d a , the political excitement ran so h ig h that several c ie ig y m e n voted, though for d o in g so they were subjected b y la w to a fine o f $ 2 , 000 - E ig h te e n o f t h e m h ad been indicted for the of­ fence, and petitioned Parliam e n t to remit the fine. It seems that there is no p ro sp ect of th eir petitions b e in g granted. A V a l u a b l e B o y .— ‘W h a t c a n you do?’ asked a traveller of a c o u n try u rc h in w h o m he saw in front of a f a rm e r’s house, tickling a toad with a long slick. ‘O, I can do m o r’n c o n siderable; I rides the turkeys to w ater, m ilks the geese, c a rd s d o w n the old rooster, put u p the pigs tails in p a p e r to m a k e ’em curl, h a m s tr in g s the g rass-hoppers. .m a k e s fires-for th e fleas to c o u rt by, keeps tally for daxl aJid'maiSmy‘’t#bjin t;h^'Scoid^t?ia ma^k. and cuts the buttons off’father’s coat, when h e ’s at p r a y e r in the m o rn in g V A c u r i o u s F a c t .— A lady in F itzroy square has a cat which in the course o f last y e a r b ro k e fifiy plates, s ix c re a m jugs, two brass candle­ sticks, three soup tureens, fifty lea cups and one poker, and h as eaten no less than thirty c h ic k ­ ens. two sweetbreads, seven turkeys, three legs of lamb, and three pots o f preserved apricots.—=■ Nevertheless, this e x traordinary cat is th e g r e a t­ est favorite with the cook and a ll the servants, and is th e second p e rsonage in the house. T h e suicide is alw a y s aeo.vard; when a man has n o t the c o u ra g e to face the ills ofrth-is life and gi a p p le with them, h e a lw a y s dodg­ es the issue and sneaks out of the difficulty With a bullet in h i s k r a i n or a rope round bis gullet. A G ood O n e . — “ M y dear, w h a t shall we nam e o u r b a b e !” said M r. S m ith to Mrs. S m ith, the othet day. “W h y h u z, I ’ve settled on P e te r.” “P e t e r ! G o o d L o rd , I n e v e r knew & m an with the sim p le n a m e o f P e te r w h o could earn his salt.” ‘•W ell, then, we’ll call h im S alt P e te r .” A CKapter\ about tlie India R u b - T h e following a c co u n t o f th e mode in w h i c h the vefyW efuT-and in'cfeasihgly im p o rtant aft!-' cle o f c o m m e rc e , n a m e d caoutchouc, is o b ta in ­ ed, w ill We d o h b t not, p ro v e iriteresting'to ou r readers. ’W e e r e indebted ior the statement to the B r a z ilian correspondent o f tin A m e r ic a n paper— i “ T h e caoutchouc f r e e groWs, in g e n e r a l to the h e ig h t o f forty o r fifty feet w ithouttranche?, then b r a n c h in g rims u p fifty feet h ig h e r. T h e leaf is la b o u r six inches long,.thin,- aiid shaped like that of a peach tree. T h e trees s h o w their w o rk in g , b y the n u m b e r of knots, Or bunches, m a d e h y t a p p i n g ; and* a s in g u la r fact is,'that, like a cow, when most tapped,- they g iv e the most m ilk o r \sap. A s lhe time o f o p e ra ting is early d ay ; before sunrise we w e re ready. T h e blacks a r e sent through the forest ,1 a r m e d with a quantity o f soft clay; a n d ti sm a ll p ickaxe. On, com ih g to o n e o f th e frees, a portion of soft c la y is formed into a c u p and,stuck lo the trunk. . T h e ■black th e n s tr ik in g his pick o v e r the cup, the sap oozes o u t slowly, a tree giving d a ily a b o u t a gill. T h e tapper c o n tinues in this w a y , tap­ ping p e rh a p s fifty trees, w h e n h e returns, a n d with a ja r, p a ssing o v e r the s a m e g ro u n d , e m p ­ ties his cups. So by seven o’clock the b la c k s cam e in with their jars, ready for w o r k in g ..—3 T h e sap at this stage resembles m ilk in a p p e a r- ance, and s o m e w h a t in taste. It is \frequently drunk with perfect safety. I f left standing now. it will c u rd le like m ilk, d is e n g a g in g a w a ­ tery substance like whey. Shoem a k e rs n o w a r r a n g e themselves to form the g u m . Seated in the shade, w ith a large p an of m ilk on o n e side, and on the o th e r a flagoon, in w h ic h is b u rn e d a n u t p e c u liar to this c o u n ­ try. e m itting a d e n se smolte the'operator h a v in g his last, o r form, held b y a f o n g s tick o r h a n d le previously b esmeared with soft clay, (in o r d e r id slip o ff th e s h o e when finished,) holds it o v e r the pan, and p o u r in g on the m ilk until it is cov­ ered. sets the coating m the smoke, then giving it a second coat, repeats the s m o k in g ; ancl so on, with a third and fourth, u n til the shoe is of the required thickness, averaging from six to tw e lv e coats. W h e n finished, the shoes on the f o rm s are p laced in the sun the rem a in d e r of th e d a y to drip. N e x t day, if required, they may. be fi­ gured, b e in g .so soft that a n y impression will be indelibly received. T h e natives a r e very d ex ­ terous in this w o rk . . W i t h a q u ill and s h a r p pointed stick they* w ill produce finely lined leaves a n d flowers, such as y o u m a y h a v e seen on the shoes, in a n \incredibly short space of time. After rem a in in g on the forms two o r three days, the shoes a r e c u t open 8 n the lop,al­ lowing the last to slip out. T h e y a r e then tied together and slung on poles, ready for thfe mar­ ket. T h e r e pedlars and J e w s trade for them with the country- people; a n d in lots of-a thous­ and o r m o re they a r e sold tothe merchants,.who have them stuffed with straw, a n d 'packed in boxes to export, in w h ic h state they a r e receiv­ ed in the U n ited States. In the s a m e m a n n e r, any shape m a y b e manufactured. T h u s toys are m ad e o v e r c la y forms. A lter drying, the clay is b r o k e n a n d extracted. Bottles, & c., a r e also m a d e in the s a m e m a n n e r. A c c o rd in g as the g u m g r o w s older, it b ecomes d a r k e r in color T h e num b e r of c a o u tc h o u c trees in the p ro v in ce is countless. In s o m e p a rts whole forests of them exist, and they a r e fre» fluently c u t d o w n for fire-wood. A lthough the tree exists in Mexico ancl the E a s t Indies, there appears to be no importation into the United States from these places. T h e reason I s u p p o se must he the • w a t if o f th at prolificness found in them h£re. ^ ’Ke'Sa’&u'tSilfouc' ed all the y ear, but g e n e ra lly in the w et seasons th'ey h av e rest, o w in g ’to the flooded state of the w o o d ; and the m ilk b e in g watery, requires more to manufacture th e s a m e a rticle than in the dry season.” T w i l i g h t P h i l o s o p h y . — N a t u r e seems to teach us not to w o rk by twilight. A t a n y rale this h as been esteemed for a g e s a wise m a x im . T h e r e a re h o u rs e n o u g h , of d a y light. A s im i­ lar m a x im should g u id e u s iu o u r investigation of truth. Enough m a y b e learned b y c le a r a n d satisfactory methods, to occupy tr a r d a y of in­ vestigation. W e have no occasion to throw ourselves into a fog. T h e r e a r e great truths in abundance, w h ic h we m a y c o m e to k n o w c le a r ­ ly and he able to state c le a rly. W e n eed n o t occupy o u rselves w ith shadows. If we would be discoverers of truths hitherto unknown, we shall do better to h u n t for them iu the daylight than in-the tw ilight.- D a r k n e s s m a y h e lp o u r imagination, b u t it cannot aid uu r perceptions. M a n y men have g ro p e d all their lives in the dark places o f p h ilosophy, s training their e y e s in the d u b io u s void, w h o m ig h t h a v e lived and labored to g o o d p u rp o se in the sunshine. G u a n o — T h i s m a n u re has n o w b ecome an article of-such peculiar interest a n d extensive consumption, that we b eg to lay before d u r rea- ders-r-and p a rticuliary o u r a g r ic u ltural friends — th e following statistics as to.ihe stock a n d c o n ­ sumption, which m a y prove interesting at the present season. ■ F r o m statements \we h av e re­ ceived it a p p e a rs that the c o n su m p tion last sea­ son in G r e a t B ritain,of P e r u v ia n & African g u ­ ano w as a b o u t 60,000 tons,at p rices r a n g in g from 8 /. to 10Z. T h e stock on the 1st o f ’Jan., 1845, in a ll the ports was 3 9 ,0 0 0 . D u r in g the first four m o n th s, w e m a y c a lc u la te on a further im ­ port o f 4 5 ,0 0 0 tons, m a k in g t h e stock on the 1st of M a y ,a b o u t8 5 ,0 0 0 tons o n ly — and th is to m eet a d emand, on a raoderate Calcutj}tion, of 1 8 0 0 0 0 or 200 , 000 . tons. Prices are, consequently, ad- fancing, a vve m a y look for gieat activity in th e trade immediately. O n W e d n e s d a y a c a r g o o f 346 to n s of Ichaboe guano Was .offered for- p u b ­ lic s a le at the Broomielaw, w hed the whole, was sold jo a few minutes at from 51. 5s. to 61. 7$ 6 d.. as it lay.— [G la s g o w Chronicle. “W a l k i n g into the public favor” is a c o m m o n phrase, but Benjam in W e s t, the g re a t painter, actually skated into the affections q f the British nobility, w h o were so de-lighted w ith his perfor­ mances on the S e rp e n tine in the P a r k , that th e y inquired h im out, a n d the ice Was melted into show e rs o f patronage. - I n c r e a s e o f P a s s e n g e r s . — T h e train of cars that arrived last evening had one more pas- seiiger when it leached the Depot here, than paid his way. A lady, whose husband has been dead about three months, (and .who was hastening h o m e to her father’s in tlie countiy) ■was delivered of a fine child while the car? were- ffoirfg at the rate of thirty miles an hour. Sev­ eral ladies and the Major officiated at the birth, and the affair came off in the Ladies’ Saloon with propriety and secrecy. M a n y of the p as­ sengers were not in the secret at all. W h e n the c a rs arrived, the lady put the little fellow in her muff, and walked into the Depot House, where she was comfortably provided for: it takes the Yankee Women to do these things up in good style.—[Portland Argus,Feb. 26. F a t a l D u e l . — A n affair o f h o n o r came>off near the H a m p to n Course, at A u g u s ta -on T h u r s d a y , the 2 0 th insf., between Maj. J o h n Partlow , of A b b e v ille D istrict, and J o h n C . B u r ton, E sq ., of N e w b e r r y District, S. C . T h e y fought with M u s k e t s , at ten paces, and Mr. Burton fell m o rtally wounded a t the first fire.— H e wa 3 conveyed to H u b b a r d ’s Hotel. H a m burgh, a n d died ten h o u rs afterwards. Both o f these geBtlemen had m a rried e a c h others sis­ ters. and the difficulty w h ic h led to th is fatal re­ sult, is said to h a v e o riginated in p rivate affairs, of w h ic h the public should k n o w n o th in g . T h e mode of fighting was chosen by Mr. B u r to n and to s a y the least of it was b a rb a ro u s ^ a n d a l­ most u n p recedented. A relative of M r .B u iton’s, Lieut. G o g g in s , o F th e U . S . A r m y , fell in a sim ilar recontre, y e a r s a g o , on w h ic h Occasion this u n u s a l weapon was used, and we im a g in e he d erived the p recedent from that affair.— [S. Carolinian. . ■ - E f f e c t o f F r i g i I t .— Som e two o r three weeks ago, says the Cam b ridge (M ass.) A d v e r­ tiser, a y o u n g wom a n , whose n a m e we do not give, went to the h o u se of a poor but re sp ectable man, n a m e d H ig h , with whose * d a u g h te r she was on v e ry intimate terms, h av in g on a m a s k m ad e to resemble an ass’s head. Finding the poor g irl alone, and thinking to enjoy a fine piece o f fu n in frig-htening her, s h e insisted on her d an cing. T h e poor c re a tu re was so d re a d ­ fully frighted that she fell into fits 5 which c o n ­ tinued for som e time, w h e n she b e c a m e a d ecid­ ed lunatic; hut the shock her whole frame had sustained was too violent, and narure s»«e-\vay to the su f f e r i n g s - 'c o n s e q u e n t t h e r e o n . d r e d a sacrifice lo the thoughtless folly ofa foolish Companion.— [Lous, Jour. P r a c t i c a l I n s t r u c t i o n -. — A g e n tlem a n not long since, took up an apple to show a niece, Sixteen y e a r s o f ag e, w h o had studied g e o g r a p h y several y ears, som e th in g a b o u t the shape a n d motion of the e a rth. S h e looked at h u n a few minutes, and said with m u c h earnestness, “W hy uncle, y o u d o n ’t m e a n that th e e a rth really turns round ?” H e replied,* “ But- did y o u not. le a rn that several y e a rs a g o ? ” “Yes, sir;” s h e r e ­ plied, “ I learned jt, but I never k n e w it before. N o w it is (obvious that this yo u n g , lady had been laboring several years on the\ subject o f geography, a n d g r o p in g in a lm o st total d a r k ­ ness, because some kind friend did not s h o w her al the onset, - b y som e fam iliar illustration, that the e a rth really turned round.— [Am e rican A n n a ls of E d u c a tion. T h e r e Is a w a y to p revent b e a s tly drunken­ ness w h ic h m ig h t b e 'a d o p ted With safety by the com m u n ity.. L e t’ the o v e rseers 6 fth e P o o f in every town publish the ’nam e s Of notorious drunkards, a n d w a r n all tavern k e e p e rs arid g r o ­ cers that if th e y sell liquor to such persons they will b e \visited by the law, 'which p rovides ’pen­ alties for s u c h cases.— [Catskill D e m . A P e r v e r s e L i t i g a n t . — T h e most distin­ guished litigant this world e v e r beheld died lately at R o m e , the P r i n c e F ra n c e s c o di-Massi- no. T h a t h e should h a v e attained the good old age of ,71 years will surprise all who have know n the a n x ie tv a n d wear and tear of a s in g le lawsuit, w h e n it fs k n o w n that this mail o f iron nerve had,, at the d ay o f his d eath, not less lh ati 700 law prpcesses p e n d in g in th e different c o u rts and tribunals o f t h e R o m a n states, a n d that h e had attended to all, o r nearly .all o f them p e r­ sonally, a s far as h e was p ermitted to d o so by the laws, w h ich adroit n p o r a l p ro ceedings, h u : confine all lo paper. A s m ig h t naturaljy be expected, most o f th ese law suits w e re for b ag a- ’ tel Is and m e re trifles, and in, their prosecution the,Prince h ad wasted a; co n siderable patrimony^ P i s T p L s f o r t w o !*-—M rs . fifunn, of V e r ­ mont, .recently presented h e r d u e l-hating hua- band with a brace 0 ) litllepislols !

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