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Binghamton courier. (Binghamton, N.Y.) 1844-1849, May 28, 1845, Image 1

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T H E B I N G H A M T O N C O U B I E R , ^ . } fe TUBUSIED ETUT WEDNESDAY, A t $ 2 p e r a n n u m , i n A d v a n c e . . , OrtiCE at j . R. O rton ’ s B ookstore . 1..1 RATES O F ADVERTISING. I URie one week, “ three weeks, - 1 year, 1 year, Whole column 1 year, - Professional Cards not exceeding 10 lineb, ' - H a lf column <U $00 50 1 00 8 00 15 00 30 00 5 00 *! 3 rLegal advertisements at the rates allowed by law.’ li/T O R T C r A G E S A L E .—'M o rtgagor John G. Er- < J i V A vine, M o rtgagee H e n r y M a ther, A s s ignee of I ^M ortgage A m m i D o iibleday; M o rtgage dated the I h e ighth day o f M a rch, in the y e a r o f o u r L o rd one • thousand e ig h t h u n d red and forty tw o , Recorded in B room e county clerks office, the ninth day of “ M arch', one thousand eight hundred and forty two, cc'afenlne o’clock A . M . in hook of M o rtgages N o . 10. .p jp^ges 135 .and 136, A m o u n t claim e d to be due at th e first p u b lication of this notice, fourteen dollars, am o u n t to b ecom e d u e tw o hundred dollars w ith i n ­ terest from the e ighth day o f M a rch, on© thousand f :’eig h th u n d red a n d forty five. .D e s c ription ofM o rt- - i gaged prem ises, \ A l l those tw o ‘certain lots or p a r- ? .cels,of land. lying i n the village o f Bingham ton be­ in g Ipts num ber, five and six (5 a n d 6) in Double- F day. a n d Lew is’ subdivision o f o r ig in a l lot num b er seventy e ight (78) s ituated on the east side o f th e tr C h e n a n g o r iv e r a n d bounded as follow s : southerly r,<cn A c a d e m y o r H e n r y s treet: east by lot num b er -. seven (7); w est b y lot n u m b e r four (4); and north- * «riyby*'lands o f.H . LeW is. said lot num b e r six t f ) ^ Vs fifty five feat front a h d fifty s ix feet rear a n d a- stjbouLone h u n d red and eighty s ix feet deep. Said ’lot.num b e r five (5) is fifty five feet front a n d fifty s i x feet r e a r and aoout o n e hundred a n d ninety five ’'te c t deep. Said m o rtgaged prem ises w ill b e sold at public auction on S a turday the 10th day of J u ly n e x t, at 12 o’clock a t noon, at the C o u rt H o u s e in $ 'B ingham ton i n the c o u n ty o f Broom e. Dated A p ril 12th 1845. ; JN O . H . H . P A R K , A tt’y. A . D ocsleday , Assignee; S H E R I F F S S A L E .-B y virtue o f one execution .i issued *«ut of the office of the Clerk of the * ^cefinty o fBm o m e, and to me directed and deliver­ ed, against the goods and chattels, lands and tene­ m e n ts o f George P. H a m lin in my b ailiwick, I h ave f levfed on and shall expose to sale a t public a u c tion - .- a s .the law directs, at the Phenix Hotel now kept ‘ and. occupied by IsaacB .G e r e in the village oi Binghamton, County of Broome and State of N. Y o rk, o n Saturday the 21 st d ay of June, in the year •“ o f o u r L o rd o n e thousand eight h u n d red and forty vfiv#; alilO o’clock in the forenoon o f that d a y , all ( atl\e r ig h t, title, interes-t, claim and dem and o f the said George P. H a m lin of in a n d to the following A s c ribedprem ises to w it:—All that certain p ie;eo r •p a rcelo f lan d , situate lying and being in the town ygof;Gheuango and county of Broome and state of N e w Y o rk, and being part of Lot No. eighty three (8 3 ) in the Grand division o f the Boston P u rchase, so called, a n d beginning a t the o riginal north east ®16brner o f said Lot, thence running south upon the ii o r iginal e a s t line of said Lot one half the o riginal w idth thereof unto a stake and stones, thence west on a parallel line with the original north line ol Che L o t so far that a parallel line with the first line ’ m entioned running lo the o riginal n orth line of the ^ L o t and thence to the place of beginning, shall fcontain tw enty live a c res of land: together with all and s ingular the hereditaments and appurten- .ances thereunto belonging or in any wise apper­ taining. A L S O , all that tract or p arcel o f ‘land described as follows', v i z : F ifty acres o f land to be m easured off from the east end ol the south half o f L o t No. one hundred and eighteen, (118) of the G rand division of the Boston Purchase, so called, in the said town of Chenango and county of .^Broome: together with all and singular the here­ ditam ents aiid appurtenances thereunto belonging ' o r in any w ise appertaining. A L S O , a part o f * L o t N o . one hundred and nineteen,’(119) in the Boston Purchase,so called, in thetow n o f C h e n a n ­ g o and county of Broome aforesaid, bounded as fallow s: beginning at the south w e s tcorner o f said * Lot!N o . one hundred and nineteen (119) and run- .ning one halt* the width o f said lot, thence east one .h u n d r e d .a n d sixteen rods, thence north sixteen rods, fhenee east ten rods, thence south to the south ■line o f said Lot to a stake and stones near V a n C u ren’shouse, thence west o n the south line o f said Lot to thg place of beginning, containing fifty five and a half acres of land De the same more or less: . together with all and singular the hereditaments ^and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anv ’appertaining.—Dated at Binghamton, this 8 th ‘•ifaf’d f M ay, in tlie year of our Lord one thousand teig h t h u n d red a n d fortv five. , 7 JO S E P H B A R T L E T T , Sheriff. 11 -■■■»' i “ Equal Protection t o . all Classes.”— J a m e s K. P o l k . VOL. VII, NO. 10.] BINGHAMTON, N. Y.—WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 1845. [WHOLE NO. 714. JWL VALUABLE FAKM AND M l- Mills jfor Sale. The subscri­ ber offers for sale his valuable and w e ll k n o w n F a rm , G rist M ill a n d Saw M ill, a t Castle C reek s ix m iles from Bingham ton on the m a in road to Lisle. T h e F a r m contains 150 a c res ofland, 100 u n d e r good im p rovem e n t, gently u n d u lating w ith a good soil w e ll w a tered. T h e C a stle C reek runs through it. Aside from the m ills there are upon it three com fortable ’dw e lling houses, a n d the n ecessary out houses. T h e f a r m h a s a valuable orchard. 1 ' ' Tjbe m ills are i n good condition, w ith a good runi o f custom , T h e grist m ill has been built about ten y e a r s a n d has tw o good ru n o f stones .i T h e saw ­ m ill has b een built about h a lf that tim e , a n d the supply o f w a ter is abundant. , T h e price of the above property w ill be m ade satisfactory—term s of p aym ent, one h a l f cask in hand, and tim e given for the b a lance. T H O M A S F R E N C H . Castle C reekM a rch 07.1845. 0m3 M I L L I N E R Y . N e w S p r i n g F a s h i o n s a n d N e w G o o d s , M RS. D A V IS has just returned from New York . w ith the new Spring Fashions, and a n ele­ gant assortment o f Millinery and Fancy Goods, to which she begs leave to call the attention ofthe ladies o f Binghamton. ' G rateful for the very liber­ al patronage she h a s received during the past sea­ son, she assures them that no pains w ill be spared on her part to accommodate them a n d gratify their tastes for the future. H e r spring styles are very becoming, her materials rich, and the prices can­ not fail to be satisfactory. Leghorns and Straws, cleansed and dressed as usual,, and all kinds o f M illinery done in tbe most fashionable style. Dress M aking, cutting and fitting—to a lim ­ ited extent. Binghamton M ay 1,1845. New Store—New Goods. C H E A P E R T H A N T H E C H E A P E S T . T H E Subscriber h aving taken the LeRoy Store, one door east of the Canal, is ndw opening a large and g eneral assortment of goods, consisting oi D ry Goods, Groceries, Boots and Shoes, Paints, Oils, and Dye Stuffs, Nails, &c., &c. all of which will be sold lower than tbey can be bought at'any other store in the Stale. Those hav­ ing any doubt of the truth ofthis assertion are re­ quested to call and he convinced. F . W . T O M P K IN S . M ay l«t 1845. Watcli Repairing, Jewelry, <fcc. T H E SU B S C R IBER H A S JU S T R ECEIVED a lot of Black & W h ite Bugles Gilt and steel Beeds, Silver Pencils, Silver thimbles Guards, Pens, Violin Strings, Spectacles &c. &c. H e also M A N U F A C T U R E S and keeps on hand Silver Table, Desert, Tea, Cream, M ustard, and Sait Spoons, S u g a r Tongs &c. all of which are war­ ranted o f sterling Silver, C L O C K S W A T C H E S of every description Repaired and warrented at the shortest notice by A L F R E D J. EV A N S . Binghamton Sep.16 1844. S H E R I F F ’S SA L E .—By v irtue ofone execution I .issued o u t o f the clerks office o f the county of f Brqome,a-od to me directed and delivered, against ,'ih e goods and chattels lands a n d tenements ol'W il- 'lla S i Newby, in my bailiw ick, I have levied on -aitaS .-shall expose for sale at public auction as the la w directs, at the P u b lic H o u s e now kept and oe ■pupied by Edwin Northrup in tbe village o f H arpers- * v ille, county of Broome and state ol New York on - S a tu r d a y the 3cl day of M a y next, in the year of •ioufr lord, one thousand eight hundred and fortv five a \ £ o’clock in the afternoon of that day, a ll the right, title, interest, claim and dem and <>f the said W illiam Ncwbv, o l in and to the fallowing cie- '’sdribedprem ise's, to w it: A ll that certain lot p iece ~or p a rcel o f land situate in ihe town ol Sanford a n d i n the county ofBroome and State o fN . York, and.bounded « ik follows: A ll that certain lot of *iana being lo t N o . two in sub division N o . three o f «the second tract in W a rren township b eginning at th e north west corner of lot No. one a t a stake and .^tongsnear a beech tree cornered and marked No. one and two W L C running thence north three de­ grees east 21 chains and 80 links to a hemlock sap­ ling m arked No. 2 nnd 3. thence south 87 degrees noast 58 chains and n inety links to a stake andstones .m a rked No. 2, 3, 8 and’9, thence south 3 degrees yvesl21 chains and 59 links to a hemlock stake and stones ' marked No. 1,2, 7 and 8 , thence north 87 -iiegfecs and 12 m inutes west 58 ehains a n d 90 links ^tojhe p lace o f beginning containing one hundred .and-twenty seven acres and 81-100 acre ofland lie \the same more or less; together w ith all and sin g u lar the hereditaments and appurtenances .tfedreunto belonging, or in* any wise appertaining. .D ated at Binghamton this 10th day of March, in tbe vegr ol our Lord one thousand eigfht h u n lred *ind forty five. JO S E P H B A R T L E T T , Sheriff. B j B , T yrrell Deputy. 51 'PoeTPONEMENT. Tlie sale of the’above describ- i i k n i k y ftnl& A inl u n til llm h y tU tHyvGTune atth? same place and time of 'Aar as above mentioned. 1 JO S E P H B A R T L E T T , Sheriff, T y r r e l l , D e p u t y . T a r o j i c p . - T l It.’ D ickinson, Surrogate of In pursuance, o f a n O rder of J o h n _ the County of Uroonte., notice is hereby given, to all persons ■fcavingr'claims ag a in s t the estate o f John W . T . J ^ ^ r ^ J a t e of Conklin in said county, deceased, to srese n t.th e sam e, w ith the vouchers thereof to the Yftldersighed.at h e r residence in Conklin aforesaid o r ^before-the 10th day o f N o v e m b e r next.—D a - led-M a y 8,1845. M A R G A R E T P O T T E R , - ‘il& m . Administratrix. Polish Your Boots !! N O m an can be well dressed unless his boots are well blacked, and i f you want you»- boots to shine according to the latest style, buy H IN D S SU­ PER IO R O IL P A S T E BLA C K IN G , an entirely new preparation, W a rranted to notinjure theleath- er, and to p roduce a more beautiful lustre than any slacking e v e r used. For Sale W h o lesale and retail by L. M. R E X F O R D , Sole agent. A P o e t 's R o m a n c e a n d R e a l i t y . [The Howitts are all pqets. William, Mary and Riebard, are well known by their writing*, and what is more, they reduce their poetry to practice. Among the schemes entertained by this family and their friends, was the settling of a colony in Australia,.uji- on poetic and peace principles, and antagonist to worldly wisdom and the working-daj world. A fer­ tile tract was obtained some two or three years ago by the Utopians, and Richard Howitt and family, with several ethers, all of the society of Friends, left the rugged shores and changeful skies of England, forthe ever-blooming fertility and cloudless skies of the southern hemisphere. William and Mary, with some additional colonists, were to join them in their para­ dise after a time. Tho first tidings tho world at, large has of the success of tfe© ©qdeayvr— Slid »ll th* world were its well wishers—comes in the form of a lyric from Richard, which tells os very plainly that the first generation will sing the songs of exile, though their posterity may have no “ old impressions” to mar the delights . of their balmy, beauteous, Australian heritage.] OLD IMPRESSIONS. 1 Nay, tell me not, the exile said, You think this land as fair as ours; That endless springs aruund us spread, That blessings rise on every hand ; O, give to me our country’s flowers, And give to me our native l*n<]. Our church yard, with its old gray wall; Our church, with its sweet Sabbath bell; Our village field, so green and small ; The primrose in my native dell— I see, I hear, I feci them a ll; In memory know and love them well. v The bell bird by the river heard— The whip bird, which, surprised, I hear— In me have powerful memories stirred Of other scenes and strains more dear; Of sweeter songs than these afford, The thrush and blackbird warbling elear. The robin which I here behold, Most beautiful, with breast of flame! No cottage entercr, shily bold, No household bird in seasons drear, Is wild, is silent; not tbe same Babe-burying bird of ancient fame; Where is the strain I was wont to hear, The song of russet leaves and sear ? O, call it by some other name 1 I’m tired of woods forever green; I pine to see the leaves decay; To see them, as our own are seen, Turn crimson, orange, russet, grey; To see them, as I ’ve seen them oft, By tempest torn and whirled alo(t; Or, on some bland, autumnal day, A golden season, stiil and soft. In woodland walk, in garden croft, i-Die silently, and drop away. .. BEST IN TO W N !! H a t , c a p a n d f o t s t o r e . —A. B. Rogers, would respect­ fully say to his friends and the public generally, that, he has received most of his F a l l and W inter stock of gbods, consisting in part ofthe following articles: every description of F u r trimmed cloth Caps; Otter, Seal and M usk­ rat Caps; hair, seal and sellet mens’and boys p lain and fancy Caps: Also, a beautiful assortment of Ladies’ a n d M isses’ g enuine L Y N X M U F F S , Ladies’ Neck-ties and F u r trim m ings of every description—in short, any thing the ladies may call lor in this line. Also, a first rate assortm ent of B U F F A L O ROBES, of superior quality, and se- :at c a re. Likewise a full supply of oi the best quality, and the latest Fall Patterns, w a rranted to be highly superior to eastern box, or “ wooden nutm e g ” hats, for q u a lity and durability, as any one will observe by examination. Persons w ishing to purchase any of the above mentioned articles, will do well to call before p u r­ chasing elsewhere, as all of theiq wili be sold ex­ trem ely low for cash or ready pay. N. B. W h e n you come, letch along y o n r S H E E P P E L T S a n d C O O N S K I N S , and every description of shipping Furs, as they will be taken in exchange for goods, a n d sometimes for cash. You will find us opposite our old location in thie Store now occupied by W m . Pratt, 2 doors w e s tot Rexford’s corner, Court st. Binghamton. A . B ROGERS. Binghamton, April 10,1845. G R E A T E X C I T E M E N T A t N o l a n d ’s E m p o r i u m o f F a s h i o n . G R E A T ^Excitement p revails in consequence o£ the strife among the gentlemen to Brovide them selves w ith clothing, m ade u p in the new st^le, o f th e new and beautiful assortm ent o f goods just opened a t this G efabrated Establishm e n t. T h e p r o p r ie to r h a s placed h im s e lf i n d ir e c t c o m - munication with H. & G. Camfaing, the celebrated R e p o rters-of the \Parisian fashions in P a r is , from w h o m he'receives the Report o f the fashions Sem i monthly—which, together with his Extraordinary Skill and Taste in the art of Tailoring, Enables him to m a k e u p g a rm e n ts in better style, and b etter fitted than a t any other Establishment in the county B room e, a n d last though n o t lease m u c h Cheaper . Clothing Ready M ade a t astonishing low prices. W.H. NOLAND. M a y 7th 1845. M r s . C a u d l e ’s C u r t a i n L e c t u r e s . [From the London Punch ] Mrs. Caudle becomes Amiable, and wouldhave a New Dress. Dear me! Mr. Caudle, if you hav’nt forgot your nightcap— do pul it on my dear, or you catch cold. Ar’nt you cold my dear?— Susan, bring me the blanket that is under Ijttle Billy’s bend. Sally has finished your shirts, mv dear, and very nice they qre. The sweet child has been very industrious indeed, trying o gel them done for you to wear to tbe Skilark ner. Sha’nt g o !— O! you rr.ust go, indeed you must go, indeed you must; Sally will be so isappointed if her dear papa don’t wear on* of the new shirts to the Skilark dinner. She has ieen talking about it lot — to be sure, to be sure was opposed to your joining the Skylarks, my ear, bui then you have joined you know and you miift appear respectable. Cross about it, was I? Well, may be I was a liille, but then my dear I had been so much troubled about the louse, that I could not help it. Do tuck your­ self up, my dear; I am sure you must be cold You men don’t know what we poor women lave to endure, Mr. Caudle. I’m sure if the men had as much trouble as the women do, you would not be such good tempered people, either. But you don’t know any thing about it. I’m sure it would spoil the temper of a saint. It is all drudge, drudge, work, work, the whole day ong, and it would worry the life out of any bo dy- I have been thinking my dear, that you hac ietter get a new coat for the dinner, y o u r ok i 9 ?K? ?? i h a w y i v n g - y w a r e m m ’'^n, it don’t look well enough. M r. Grey has; ordered a new suit, for Mrs.. Grey told me so, and you bad better step o v e r to M r. B r o w n ’sanc order a new coat in the morning—a black one I adm ire a black coat. A n d .M rs. G rey is to lave an elegant new silk for the halt— a figur­ ed one, very beautiful. Mr. Grey lets her have new dresses, just whenever she asks it. I know it— to be sure— Mr Grey ;ig richer han you, but one must appear decent, an y how M y old 'dress is so shabby that I really sh°u)d b? ashamed to be seen in it. Don’t you think * A D M IN IS T R A T O R S N O T ICE.—Iu pursu itjL ape© o f a n O rder or Jtjhn R. Dickinsou, Sur- t^gate’ o f the Countv of Broome, notice is hereby to a ll persons h aving claims against Samuel eSvkJBihckley , lath o f Chenango in said County de- rep r e s e n t the same with the vouchers th e r e o l, to the undersigned, at the house ol Mrs. <SAiCe H inckley, in Chenango aforesaid, on o r •fefdfenfc'e'Hth day Of Tune next. Dated Dec. 10, V E L K A N A I I H IN C K L E Y , 38-6ra Adm inistrator. A ♦& jVew Flough Manufactory. T ^ ’A R M E R S T A K E N O T IC E .—T h e subscriber J l v%as‘eoiiimenced the m anufacture of Ploughs, ttt.the village.of ,Binghamton, and i s now prepared to furnish the F a rm e rs o f Broome County with a superior article, made o f the verv best castings and lim b er, and of the latest and m o st approved pat- ♦Im i;' Persons w ishing to purchase a re invited to S tll a t his m a n u factory, one d o o r n o r th o f J o h n A. olljier’s office in F ranklin St., where the Ploughs m ay b e qxamitied, and where they may be obtained Ss cheap as a t a n y other establishment- in the state o f N e * York. Ploughs w ill also be repaired a t sh a ll n o tice, and by competent and experienced w o rkm e n ; and a ll kinds, o f farm ing produce will f e received inpaym e n t, , PlotlgKs and C A S H exchanged for all L u m b e r. _ H T T I. L. B A R T L E T T . - J jiPgharatottyA p n l 2 ,1845. ________ p2-tf N & M E N D O U S R U S H A T TH E E M P O R l O F FASHION. F iH r N O L A N D has just returned from New the F»»Mons. Don’t ■; to e a J l and see theip-- ■ -» . , > „ $ & H p r i W 8 4 5 . » P A I N T S A N D O I L S , t fresh supply of P u r e ExcraNo. t W h ite Lead, Raw and Boiled Linseed Oil, Pressed W h a le Oil. V e n e tian Red, French Yellow, Spruce Y e l­ low, E m erald Green, Chrom e Green, Yerdegrise, Spanish Brown, W h iting, Paris W h ite, Putty, Sue. &c. For sale a t New York prices, call at ' T R I V E T T ’S Opposite the \ P h e n ix H o tel.” To the Ladies in particular. A N D to a ll who a re desirous o f a Y o u t h f u l a p * ; p e a r a n c e , o r a r e t r o u b l e d w i t h P i m p l e s , E r u p - tjo n * , recent F r e c k l e s , T a n n e d or D r i e d and S h r i ­ v e l l e d Sxitr, o r P r e m a t u r e VV r i n k L e s , L E B A U M E D E N IN O N , • or T H E F R E N C H B A L M O F B E A U T Y , Will b e found the b est remedy e v e r y e t offered fo F o r s a le by. L amton. 6 v u t UCOl ICU iCUy e v e r t h e p u b l i c . - P r i c e 5 0 c t s p r B o t t l e . I M . R E X F O R D , o n l y a g e n t a t B i n g h a New Goods at Hall’s The cheapest Store in town and no mis take. L A D IE S su m m e r D ress Goods, a large assort­ m e n t c f sutnm e r G o o d s for m en and hoysf. C h e a p B roadcloths a n d Satm e tts .verj low —Sheet­ in g cheaper than ever—Shaw ls, Gloves, Calicoes, 500pieces low e r t h a n the lowest. A lw a y s look for H a ll ’s store b efore p u rchasing. May 1. 1845. ___________________ T H E P S A L M I S T , a hew collection o f H y mns for the use o f B a p tist C h u rches, by B a ron Stow and S. F . S m ith, for s a te a t this office. May 14,1845. , . < ? H ARDWARE and Groceries uncommonly cheapat ' S. H.P. HALL’S May 1.1845. looks well en o u g h ,d o e s it! . M rs. G r e y aays.i is s h o c k in g , an d I o u g h t 10 h a v e a n e w one fo the ball and I you c a n ’t afford it ifow f It won’t cost much I’m sure — a n d it isn’t so pften that I ask for new dresses, Mr. Caudle; you know that. But you men think thank you my dear, I’m very glad you say yes, because I nly say so to avoid a row, do you? Who is making a row, Mr. Caudle,? I’m, sure I on­ ly asked for well, lei me speak, won’t you! 1 declare if I ever saw such a man. I can’t even well go to sleep then. I’m tired, too, very tired ; and I m u st get up early to-m o rrow and get things to rights before Mrs. Grey comes to go out with me. She’s promised to. help me choose tbe everlasting gabble do you say? I’m sure Mr. Caudle, there is no woman who talks less than I do, a n d I do th ic k it is cru e l in you to all of us gabble bey) Well. Mr. Caudle, if you ain’t the most provoking——* well I’m not g o ing to scold. You need’nt be so pettish, I was only going to |ay you are lucky in having*, wife that attends to matters, a n a sates you so much. 1 hav’nt spent a sixpence oii myself these three months, and although I say it, there is’nt a woman in town who \ dec., &c.,'&c. A Frankfort paper save th^re is now a t M o s c o w t h e w idow o f a d e a le r in sk in s ,.w b o has a ttained h a r .1 5 7 y e a r . , W h e n 123 s b e m a r ­ ried h e r fifth h o ebend. A l l h e r a l j i a a e i f h i v e been prosperooa e n d h i p p y . ~ T H E G L A S S - L O O K E R S . , BT J. X. ORTON. Nka* the waters of the Unadilla, in the state of New York, there lived, some year# since, a ean shoemaker and his sturdy, well-to-do wife. So lousy cobler was Samuel Fish; and no slat- ternly, good-for-nothing body was;Ruth; but, somehow or other, moutbs increased upon them ‘aster than they could^well fill them; their heap of children, as aunt Eunice said, was d r e a d f u l ; and indeed, the good, man and his family, all told, numbered a dozen and one to spare; and could they have been seen marching in a row, from a very respectable front, made up of himself and wife, they would have run down nearly to a joint. No wonder, though he industiiously pli- #*d lhe awl, and made lhe waxed ends glisten and twang, morning, noon and night, while she, with equal ardor, made music with her constant step around him, that anxious care with them was a requent guest, and want, with difficulty, barred the door.. In this dilemma, the good woman look it upon ler, one night, to dream a dream; and awoke therefrom in a very agreeable frame of mind.^— Her first impulse, was to arouse her husband, who was sleeping like a log at her side; but she bethought herself that he had had a hard day’s work, and after all, it was but a dream; ana so with commendable self-control, she again composed herself to rest. Half an hour after, she .awoke in a state of oyous trepidation, which would admit of no fur- her delay. The self same dream, complete in all its parts, had presented itself to her fancy a- gain, giving an importance to the subject matter thereof, not to be attached to the ordinary vaga­ ries of the night. She shook Samuel by the shoulders, and proceeded to recount it to him. She had dreamed that a little old man, in a tarpaulin hat and sugaf-paper small-cloihe?, stood before her; and'after complimenting her and her husband,-as very worthy, well-disposed jeople, if they only had the wherewithal! to ive, proceeded to inform her, that near at hand, under a certain tree on the banks of the Unadil- a, was buried a rich treasure; which might be theirs for the taking, and would do them and heir little ones much good. “TWas the ghost of Captain Kidd,” said Sam­ uel. , “O no, not a ghost!” said Ruth, starting. “Well, well, ghost or no ghost,” said Samu- , “it is a singular dream—a very singular dream—an extraordinary dream. Twice you tiave dreamed il, Ruth?” “Twice.” “Well, good Ruth, go to sleep agai member, if you dream it over the thi will come true lo a certainty. Go fa to sleep!” ” ,JL • I In obedience to the wishes of !wr spouse, the dame composed herself on her pillow; and Sam­ uel, after fidgeting an hquLor more in uneasy expectancv^becominAfi|ijBH|tfbps for repose. careiulljpP^p and j f lH H P V b le. With it in his hand, his lace ntwlfed With hopes, hew and exciting, he approached the bed; and lean­ ed over to see if he could get any clue to the suc­ cess of his wife, in the expression of her features She, good woman^with a start of terror, opened her eyes, and met his inquiring gaze. The can­ dle fell from his hand; and she bounded out of bed to extinguish it, and as she did so, exclaim­ ed: Why, Samuel, what on earth is the matter ? Are you going to burn me up alive?” “What luck? what luck?” shouted Samuel. “Dear me!” returned his spouse, “I have not been asleep.” ^rest-failen and discomfitted, the shoemaker crawled back into bed ; and there he lay quietly until daylight, but he lay awake. Whether his wife slept, he knew not; aiid thbugh be would have given half the contents ofhis shop to know, he dared not disturb her. At length, as gray morning had fairly got over the hills, he was electrified by a sudden spring dn her part,as she came bolt upright in bed, exclaiming, “I have it, Samuel! I have dreamed it again!” “ Tho Lord be thanked,” said Samuel: “and now, wife, dress thee, and speed the breakfast; while I myself will attend t6 the children; and then we will go and consult shaker Brown re­ specting this most singular visitation.” Shaker Brown was a tali, venerable man, of near three score and ten, who lived hard by.— His long locks were faded ntarly to a white, but his limbs retained a goodly portion of their vi­ gor, and his pure, clear, blue eye, was stiil de­ lightful to look upon. He had passed most of his life as one. of a com m u n ity of-shakers ; in- foed, for m a n y years, had been the principal of 909 9filfp most respectably ivyfaliy? of \\\§\ fjn g u l a r s e c t ; w h e n c e , h a v in g em e r g e d , and tak e n to Mm a young wife, in his old age, a child to the world, but d e e p ly im b u ed with a know ledge of hidden things,'and a love for the mystical, he was peculiarly qualified io act as cbunsellor on fin occasion like the present'. Hither went Mr. and Mrs. Samuel'Fish, for advice; and the re­ sult of their visit was satisfactory in a high de­ gree. Shaker Brown recommended that Joe Smidt, an itinerant vagabond glass-looker, who has since m ade quite a figure in the world, and w a s then in that region, but few m iles aw a y , should be sent for, to lake the command of the important affair in hand; and for him, a messeb ger was accordingly despatched. Joe Smidt, at thattime, a sturdy, ruddy,square- built young fellow; in manner halfway between a clown and a sheep thief, had already begUn fa lord it iira small' way. in matters mysterious and oetult. When he arrived, he listened very respectfully to the narration of dame Fish, but did not Condescend to ask any questions or to gape, or wonder over her dream; buttreated the subject, in ali respects, as though it were a mat­ ter o f c o u rse, that coffers of g o ld should be buri ed, that she shou ld dream about them, and he be called upon to bring them again to the light of day. He told some marvelous stories of his success in this way > and finaity, having secured to h im s e lf a c e r tain com p ensation, to be paid in hand, by Samuel land shaker Brown; beside an equal share in-the venture, he proceeded to ar­ range a pl*n of operations for disemboweling the particular treasure which the little tarpaulin man ■had mentioned to Rulh iff her dream. He ex­ hibited* a flat, opaque glass,1 or stone, about the site of his palm; which, he said, was found in thegraVe of an Indian magician, lying upon the bones of tbe skeleton, over the heart ; and which possessed the property of revealing to him the hidden; things of afcrth. Armed withthi* in valuable talisman, tbe dusk of evening was scareely safiered to approach wftti 8tamtl,*h«k*i!- Brown and Smidt ttlliet forth. Th* tre*, * spreading beach, Indicated iu R u t h ’s d r e a m ,w a s easily found; for th e r e w a s a- b r id g e a c ro s s th e U n a d iila. n e a r by it, hid by a n i n te r v e n in g clldmp o f a l d e r s ; an d indeed.both S a m u e l and his wife, had been to th e v e r y spot a h u n d r e d tiiiijes, h u n t i n g for th e ir cow , o r t h e ir pigs, o r t b e j r c h i l d r e n ; an d k n e w th e tree as w e ll a s th e y d i d th e b u ttern u t close-by t h e i r ow n d o o r . , A r r iv e d th e r e a t, S m idt very g r a v e l y put th e m a g ica l g l a s s into his hat, a n d th a t fa his face, in su c h a m a n n e r as to sh u t out all th e lig h t; w h ile S a m u e l a n d B r o w n placed th e m ­ selves on eith e r sid e o f him , and aw a ited in a v e r y t r y i n g su s p e n s e .h is expected revelations. Soon Jo e b r o u g h t dow n th e hat, and w ith an ex- clam a tipQ of d e lig h t, inform e d th e m t h a t he had discovered th e box o f gold, buried but a few feet belo w tb e su rface of th e g r o u n d ; but that it was enchanted, a n d he should have to break the spell w h ich held it there, before it could be g o t at. Satisfied w ith this, as a p r e c u r s e r , th e party retu r n e d to S a m u e l’s house, w h e r e R u t h and M rs. B r o w n a n x io u s ly aw a ited them . A n d th e r e , S m idt s h o w e d a stro n g inclination fa re­ m a in for th e n i g h t ; b u t th e a r d o r o f th e o th e rs w a s too m u c h aroused to perm it o f inactivity: th e y insisted, w ith m u c h show of reason, th a t a d e lay of e v e n one n i g h t w a s full of d a n g e r ; and th a t th e only-safe co u r s e w a s to m a k e su r e o f th e tre a s u r e w h ile it w a s w ithin th e ir r e a c h .— Jo e w a s o b liged io g iv e w a y : and as soon as th e necessary shovels and o th e r im p lem e n ts could b e got to g e th e r , th e party, en larg e d by th e addi­ tion o f R u t h an d M rs. B r o w n , retu r n e d to th e sp o t; w h e re, by this tim e , m a n y hopes a n d fears had becom e c e n tred. J o e now disposed h ir m e lf to p lay his part w ith effect. A s s u m in g a l l th e d ig n ity o f b e a rin g w h ich he c o u ld com m a n d , h e proceeded to de­ scribe a circ le aro u n d th e tre e ; and step p in g w ithin it, h e pronounced som e cabalistic w o rds, o r w o rds, at least, o f u n k n o w n s o u n d and im p o rt to his a u d itors. H a v in g , by th is cerem o n y , ta­ ken possession o f th e g r o u n d , as h e term e d it,he ch a r g e d his associates, that, w h ile th e w o rk w as in progress, th e y inustnot, on peril o f th e ir lives, or, w h a t w ith th e m w a s o f eq u a l m o m e n t, the loss o f th e treasu r e n o w so n e a r l y w ithin th e ir g r a s p , utter a s i n g l e w o r d : and, s tationing R u th and M rs. B r o w n a little a w a y , as an outpost, to g u a r d a g a in s t su r p r is e , he s e ized a bar, and th e th r e e m e n fell m o st lu s tily to d ig g in g . N e a r by th e scene o f these events, w a s a little v illa g e ; an d indeed, th e houses of S a m u e l F i s h and S h a k e r B r o w n m ig h t be s a id to form its e x ­ trem e su b u r b in th e direction o f th e r iv e r . T h e m o v in g sp ir it o f this place, w a s C o lonel Spree- a w a y ; a d r in k in g , g a m b l i n g , ro isterin g m e r­ ch a n t : and on th e n i g h t in question, the b u s i­ ness o f the d a y h a v in g been b r o u g h t to a close, he sat in his s tore, w ith sev e r a l of his t o o n com ­ panions, to a late h o u r ; and th e y m a d e th e m ­ selves m e r r y w ith sto ry t e llin g and bran d y and su g a r . A t len g th som e one of th e com p a n y s a i d : “ W h a t can h a v e .b r o u g lit Jo e Sm idt h e r e ? — .I s a w him pass by m y sh o p lo-dav.” “ Y e s , and h e stopped at F i s h ’s ,” said an o th ­ er. “ M y w ife w a s b y th e r e after d a r k , rem a r k e d a third, “and saw sh a k e r B r r w n th r o u g h the w indow , and a n o th e r m a n . I ’ll w a g e r it w a s Jo e .” ‘T h a t puts m e in m ind,” said th e colonel, “th a t I saw th r e e m e n g o in g across th e fields to­ w a rds the river, as I was c o m ing hom e to-night over th e bridge. O n e o f , them , I .knew w a s B ro w n , for he cannot be e a s ily m i s ta k e n ; but it was so d a r k that I could not m a k e out the oth- )) “ S o m e n e w m o n e y -digging h u m b u g , I ’ll w a r- ers.‘ ran t,” said another. “A n d if so,” continued ihe colonel, “they- a re a t it n o w : and I m o v e , boys, w e h a v e a little sport. G o m e , I’ll lock up, a n d we’ll take a turn dow n by the bridge.” T h i s proposition m e t w ith u n iv e r s a l fav o r; and (he co m p a n y , to th e n u m b e r o f h a l f a dozen arriv e d in th e neighborhood o f th e riv e r . D iv id in g off into little scouting parlies, it w a s not lo n g before th e m o n e y d ig g e r s w e re discovered, w h o , by this tim e , by dint of sw eat a n d v ig o ro u s blow s, h a d succeeded in ex­ cavating a hole o f c o n s iderable size in tb e loose, jra v e lly earth . H a v in g m a intained a sc r u p u l ­ ous s ilence, and cu t t h r o u g h th e m a lted roots of th e beech, w ith a chisel, th e y had g o t on w ith little nose, and th e m o re speed ; until th e sh o u l­ d e rs of tall sh a k e r B r o w n , as h e slo w ly erected h im s e lf in d i s c h a r g in g his s h o v e l’s b u r d e n ,h a r d ­ ly exceeded i n altitude t h e level of th e turf. C a refully approaching c lose e n o u g h to a s c e r ­ tain the position of affairs, w h ich thev succeeded in doing w ithout disturbing tbe sentinels of tbe nightj R u th ahd M rs. B row n j whOj like tw o de- and blood, clambered upon terra firtna, as best they might; and taking their women between th e m , b r o k e from tho m a g ic a l Spot, beset, aa they believed it to be, w ith a host o f devels from the infernal regions, and fled tovvard home. , U p to this time, it is jjrobable, that Smidt,,al* though well aware hie w as deceiving others,waa not deceived himself But now h e appears to have been caught in one of his, own snares.-— Unable to account for the singular interruptions they had experienced, he came to'the sage con­ clusion, that, inthe practice o f his conjurations, he had indeed called up the spirits of the invisi­ ble w orld; and spirits, it would seem, that il might be no very easy matter to quell. . ., Colonel Spreeaway and hjs friends, as soon as the coast was clear, ^gathered around the pit, and enjoyed a hearty* laugh. There Jay the shovels, and bars, arid picks, as they had been dropped, in the alarm which seized upon those who had them in use: and the lights by w.hich they hrd worked, w ere left burning. Dispatch­ ing one of his fellows in pursuit of the diggers, to make sure against a surprise in return, the colone.1 sent another to his store after affold box and som e nails. T h e s e presently arrived,when the box was filled with stones, nailed down, and lowered into the pit; and the party now in pos­ session, commenced digging in turn. They sunk a hole some two or three feet below the depth previously attained; and placing the-box therein, piled stones upon it. and finished by Smoothing the surface, as nearly as possible, to the shape in w h ich they found it. T h is done, they retired to their several homes. The m o n ey-diggers, m e a n w h ile, were brood­ ing over their discomfiture at shaker B rown’s. Their appearance was draggled and woe begone in the extreme; and to add to their despondency, Joe had made the astounding disclosure, that he had felt the box of gold once that night, with his shovel, just as Mrs. Brown screamed j when it moved away from his touch, grating as it w ent; and very likely had gone to lhe other side of the tree, if not farther. This sad effect of the un­ fortunate scream made Mrs. B rown, for the tirpe being a sort of scape-goat, on which the rest w e re disposed to lay, not o n ly their sins.but th e ir misfortunes;^ and occasioned her being regarded with sinister looks, even by her d o ting husband} and R uth, not content with this, in that spirit of charity, which one woman occasionally delights to exhibit to another, added a variety ol taunting expressions'; so that the pale, but round-faced and handsome Mrs. B rown kepi aloof in a cor­ ner, and pouted by herself. By and by, Smidt and Samuel gathered com­ posure and courage enough to revisit the scene of their unaccountable adventu res. They found every thing quiet, and fa appearance, as they had left it; except that the candles had burned low. These they extinguished, and piling some loose brushwood over the pit, to conceal it as much as possible from chance observation, they finally adjourned for the night. The day following was devoted by the male part ofthe money-diggers to rest. Samuel slept; but R uth, as usual, was astir. H er faith in the truth of her dream was by no m eans shaken; q nu the contrary, it seemed to have gathered s tr e n g th * from the very obstacles which had presented themselves in the w ay of its fulfillment. In fact, she was in a soit of bewilderment. Visions of wealth and the pleasures attendant thereon, floated through, her brain; and as she dismissed her husband’s customers from the door, she could not well refrain from assuming some unaccusto­ med airs, and treating them with an indifference very foreign from her usual affable deportment. Some, she informed, that her husband was sick, and could not be disturbed— others, that he had given up his shop, and they must go else­ where; and others still, that he was about to move away to the city and establish a w holesale boot and shoe store. No wonder those who lis­ tened, came to the conclusion that the poor wo­ man was demented. At shaker B rown’s the scene was somewhat similar. Mrs. B rown was rather frail, and found herself flurried from her last n ight’s exertions. — H er head was bound round with a white hand­ kerchief, ibr she had the toothache : and she would gladly have obtained some rest, but as of­ ten as she lay down, o r threw herself b ack in her rocking-chair, on her pillow s, wiih her feet up­ on a stool, and h e r tea-pot on a stand at her el- bow, she was interrupted by some one’s calling to e x a m ine the little articles of wooden w a re w h ich her husband was in tbe habit of tnanu. facturing. Indeed, Joe Sm idt was the only one of the number whom worldly matters that day had no power to disturb. He, the shrewdest o f conjurers, having eaten his fill, stretched himself at his length, in Mrs. B rown’s best bed\ and sno­ red like a prince, at his leisure. s e r t e d r i v e r nympbs, siood alone a t a liille dis­ tance from their /riends. hut eyes and soul ab­ sorbed io w h a i was going on in the pit, the c o b onel and; h is follow e r s re-assem b led n e a r th e bridge. There w a s a large bright moon, but a n occasional cloud passed over it-; and select­ in g a m o m e n t w h e n it w a s obscured, th e y be­ took themselves to the b r id g e ; and presently, th e d ig g e r s yvere interrupted by a noise, a s of a tho u s a n d cattle upon it. M rs. B r o w n s c ream e d and fled toward the pit; but Ruth, with mascu­ line , courage, stood her ground. -Joe Smidt dropped his shovel, a n d cautiously peered a* round ; and then m o tioned sh a k e r B r o w n to help himself out upon the level earth to recou- noitre. T h i s th e old gen tlem a n did w itk s o m e d ifficu lty ; but by th e tim e ho cam e in sig h t of th e bridge, a l) w a s s till. T h e m o o n w a s sh in ­ in g b r i g h t l y a g a i n ; th e b r id g e w a s bare and cold, a n d no], a liv in g t h i n g to be seen in a n y di­ rection. A fter w a itin g a little tim e , he return­ ed, and expressed to his com p a n ions, by m u te lo o k s a n d 1 g e s tures, his inability to explain the strange occurrence^ and so, after wondering in silence a minute or two, the trio proceeded in th e ir labor. Soon, how e v e r, tb e y w e re started and a l a r m ­ ed by a m o st v igorous ca te r w a u lin g , set up on a ll sides o f them , an d in t h e i r im m e d iate n e ig h ­ borhood •: an d scream s and screeches, as of a score o f panthers, s u c c e e d e d : and ev e r y variety o f n o ise w h ich m o rtal o r g a n s m a y be supposed ca p a b le o f p r o d u c ing. T h e sounds w e re en- o u g h to cu r d le one’s blood in his veins. T h e w o m e n s h rieked ; and th e m e n , not e x c e p ting tbe k i n g co n ju rer, J o e , tu rn e d pale. A n d now,, lo add to t h e i r affright, am idst th e din5 w e r e seen stran g e beings, o n a l l fours, leap in g l ik e frogs from bush to b u s h ; and tu r n i n g w ith th reaten ­ in g , a n d to th e excited im a g in a tio n s o f t h e m o n ­ ey-diggers, h e llish aspect,-tow a rd th e pit. It w a s too m u c h for hnroan stren g th to bear. Jo e S m idt, S a m u e l F i s h , a n d s h a k e r B r o w n ; bold m e n th o u g h th * y war®, a t th e y subsequently proved them M lv**, w h e n m a tched w ith flesh N i g h t h a v in g ag a in arriv e d , and th e m o o n and stars tak e n th e ir places aloft, th e party , as before, w ith th e exception th a t M rs. B r o w n w a s left behind, lik e so m a n y sheep thieves, stole in a circu it round th e h ills to th e riv e r ; and after an an x io u s survey o f Ihe placid w a ter, and th e still sh o r e and upland, resum e d th e i r labor in th e pit. Jo e w a s evidently ill at ease. T h e r e w a s an a ir of p e ip lex ity 'a n d doubt upon bis co u n ten a n c e ; and as he w a s the c e n tr a l lu m in a ­ ry, to w h o m the others looked for light, i t i s not be w o n d e red at that every m o m e n t betrayed un- certainty and apprehension. T h e s h o v e ls w e r e o p e r a t e d L y s p i r i t l e s s w i l l s , a n d a n h o u r o r m o r e w o re a w a v before they v m M t t a aIaam . ah an y evidences of tb e handiwork of Colonel S p reeaw a y and hisfriends. T h e n , indeed,there w a s a n increased m o v e m e n t am o n g th e m ; and w h e n finally the box itself w as laid b a r e , th e h a g g a r d , clu tch in g jo y o f the m n n e y -diggere w as beyond bounds; .and th e g r e a ter, as pictur­ ed on th e ir faces, that th e y dared not g iv e it tongue. N o w o rd w a s uttered— no, not e v e n b y R u th, who stood staring at the top of the pit, like one transfixed and dumb. W i t h m u c h difficulty, for it w a s found v e r y heavy, th e m y s terious chest w a s raised to th e surface, and placed upon th e ground. T h e n , w h ile th e hands of the silent o p e r a tors trem b led as w ith th e palsy, it w as attached to tw o poles b y a ro p e ; and R u th readily lending h e r aid, it w a s s low ly raised betw e en the four, and borne in toilsom e triu m p h tow a rd the village. G o i n g by the fields to avoid observation, they w e re about to descend a little hill, w h ich had cost them som e trouble to clim b , w h e n th e v w e re suddenly b r o u g h t to a stand, by a com p a n y of m en, w h o se faces w e re m u ffled in h a n d k e r ­ chiefs; and a furious assault com m e n c e d upon them . B u t th e m o n e y d ig g e r s w e re in no mpod to be trifled w ith. F o r m i n g a hollow square around th e ir treasu re, th e y gave back taunt for taunt, and buffet for buffet; and grappled w ith th e ir foes as for life o r for death. T h e exact o r d e r of the battle, how e v e r, w a s soon b r o k e n ; for R u th , w ith a quick instinct, perceiving it w a s lik e ly to go hard w iih h e r friends, th r e w h e r ­ se l f u p o n th e box, a n d grasped it in h e r a r m s : and soon thereafter, all its b rave defenders w e r e d o w n and ly i n g prostiate upon th e turf. W h i l e th e y w e re th e r e held, each by a-stren g th su p e ­ rio r to his ow n , one o f the assailants u n d e r to o k to disengage R u th from h e r hold. T h i s h e found no easy t a s k ; and lo s in g his ow n footing in th e stru g g le, cav a lier and box, and th e c o u r ­ ageous s p o u s e o f S a m u e l F i s h , to g e th e r ro lled dow n to th e bottom of th e hill. T h * reader w ill readily com e to th e co n c lu ­ sion th a t th* attack in g p a r ty w e re no o th e r t h a n

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