OCR Interpretation


The journal and Republican. (Lowville, N.Y.) 1929-current, June 28, 1972, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://dev.nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn93063682/1972-06-28/ed-1/seq-2/


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E D I T O R I A L S Happy Birthday N e x t w e e k , T u e s d a y , J u l y 4 , th e U n ited S l a t e s o f A m e r i c a w t l l b e o b s e r v i n g its 1 9 6 th b i r t h d a y . In o b s e r v a n c e of th i s d a y , we w i l l n o t w a v e th e fla g o r u t t e r p a t r i o t i c s l o g a n s , b u t i n s t e a d we s h a l l le t th e n a t i o n s p e a k f o r h e r s e l f . “ I w a s b o r n on J u l y 4 , 1 1 1 6 , a n d t h e D e c l a r a t i o n o f I n d e p e n d e n c e t s m y b i r t h c e r t i f i c a t e . T h e b t o o d l l n e s o f t h e w o r l d ru n in m y v e i n s , b e c a u s e 1 o f f e r e d fre e d o m to t b e o p p r e s s e d . 1 a m m a n y th i n g s , an d m a n v p e o p l e . I a m a n a t i o n . “ I a m 2 0 0 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 liv i n g s o u l s - a n d th e g h o s t of m i l l i o n s w h o h a v e liv e d a n d d i e d f o r m e . “ I a m N a t h a n H a l e a n d P a a l R e v e r e , f s t o o d a t L e x i n g t o n an d C o n c o r d a n d f i r e d th e s h o t h e a r d r o u n d t h e w o r l d . I am W a s h i n g t o n , J e f f e r s o n a n d P a t r i c k H e n r y , l a m J o h n P a u l J o n e s , th e G r e e n M o u n t a i n B o y s a n d D a v y C r o c k e t t . I a m L e e a n d G r a n t a n d A b e L i n c o l n . \ I a m th e B r o o k l y n B r i d g e , th e s a n d p l a i n s o f n o r t h e r n M ic h i g a n a n d th e g r a n i t e h i l l s o f V e r m o n t a n d th e f o r e s t s a n d g e n t l y flo w in g r t v e r s a n d s t r e a m s o f n o r t h e r n N e w Y o r k , f am th e c o a l f i e l d s o f W e s t V i r g i n i a a n d t h e f e r t i l e p r a l r t e s o f K a n s a s . I a m In d e p e n d e n c e H a l l , a c o u n t y c o u r t h o u s e , the M o n it o r and the M e r r i m a c . '* [ a m b i g . I s p r a w l f r o m L a k e S u p e r i o r t o th e G u l f . . m y a r m s r e a c h o u t t o e m b r a c e A l a s k a a n d H a w a ii . . . 3 m i l l i o n s q u a r e m i l e s th r o b b i n g w i t h I n d u s t r y . I a m m o r e th a n 3 m i l l i o n f a r m s . I a m f o r e s t , f i e l d , m o u n t a i n a n d d e s e r t . I a m s t e e p y v i l l a g e s and c i t i e s th a t n e v e r s l e e p . “ Y o u 1 c a n lo o k a t m e and se e B e n F r a n k l i n w a l k in g d o w n th e s t r e e t s o f P h i l a d e l p h i a w i t h h i s b r e a d l o a f u n d e r b i s a r m . Y o u c a n s e e B e t s y R o s s w i t h h e r n e e d l e . Y o u c a n s e e th e l i g h t s o f C h r i s t m a s , a n d h e a r t h e s t r a l n s o I * * A u t d I.a n g S y n e a s th e c a l e n d a r t u r n s . “ I a m B a b e R u t h a n d t h e W o r l d S e r l e s . I a m 130,000 s c h o o l s a n d c o l l e g e s , a n d 3 2 6 , 0 0 0 c h u r c h e s w h e r e m y p e o p le w o r s h i p G o d a s th e y th i n k b e s t . I a m a b a l l o t d r o p p e d i n a b o x , th e r o a r o f a c r o w d tn a s t a d i u m an d th e v o i c e of a c h o i r in a c a t h e d r a l , f a m a n e d i t o r i a l ln a n e w s p a p e r a n d a l e t t e r t o a C o n g r e s s m a n . \ I a m E H W h i t n e y a n d S t e p h e n F o s t e r . I a m T o m E d i s o n , A l b e r t E i n s t e i n , J o n a s S a i k , J o h n B r o w n , M a r t i n L u t h e r K i n g , R o b e r t K e n n e d y a n d B t l l y G r a h a m . I am H o r a c e G r e e l e y , W i l l R o g e r s and th e W r i g h t b r o t h e r s . I am G e o r g e W a s h i n g t o n C a r v e r , D a n i e l W e b s t e r a n d R a l p h N a d e r . “ I a m L o n g f e l l o w , H a r r i e t B e e c h e r S t o w e , W a lt W h i t m a n a n d T h o m a s P a i n e . “ Y e s , I a m a n a t i o n , a n d t h e s e a r e th e th i n g s th a t 1 a m . 1 w a s c o n c e i v e d In f r e e d o m a n d , Goff w il li n g , in f r e e d o m I w i l l s p e n d th e r e s t o f m y d a y s . “ M a y 1 p o s s e s s a l w a y s l h e I n t e g r i t y , th e c o u r a g e , a n d th e s t r e n g t h to k e e p m y s e l f u n s h a c k l e d , to r e m a i n a c t t a d e l o r f r e e d o m a n d a b e a c o n o f h e l p to th e w o r ld. “ A n d th o u g h m y e n s i g n Is -often ta t t e r e d and s p a t u p o n m a y It c o n t i n u e to f l y a n d m a y I c o n t i n u e to b e a h o m e fo r a n d t o l e r a n t o f t h o s e w h o th i n k I a m d e s p i c a b l e , f o r t h e y a r e - p a r t o f m e to o . ” - M i c h a e l J . B l a t r M erchants o f hate . . . R e c e n t l y , w e w e r e a p p a l l e d by a s t o r y th a t h a d b e e n c i r c u l a t e d a b o u t t h e c o u n t r y b y c e r t a i n o p p o n e n l s o f S e n a t o r G e o r g e M c G o v e r n , th e le a d i n g c o n t e n d e r f o r th e D e m o c r a t i c p r e s i d e n t i a l n o m i n a ­ tio n . W e a r e s p e a k i n g , of c o u r s e , o f th e s t o r y a p p a r e n t l y f a b r i c a t e d by th e r i g h t w in g e x t r e m i s t J o h n B i r c h S o c i e t y an d f u r t h e r e d by- N e w H a m p s h i r e n e w s p a p e r Icin g , W illia m L o e b , a b o u t S e n a t o r M c G o v e r n b e i n g r e p r i m a n d e d f o r c o w a r d i c e d u r i n g W o r l d W a r H. W e a r e lo n g f a m i l i a r w ith th e m e r c h a n t s o f h a t e o f H ie J o h n B i r c h S o c i e t y ; th p y have s h o w n th e m s e l v e s a t t h e i r u g l i e s t w o r s t too m a n y t i m e s . W e r e c a l l t h e r e f e r e n c e m a d e lo D w t g h t E l s e n ­ h o w e r ’ s la c k o f p a t r i o t i s m anil s u c h o t h e r v i l i f i c a t i o n . T h i s n e w s p a p e r a n d i t s edi t o r a r e n o t fo n d o f t h e c a n d i d a c y o f S e n a t o r M c G o v e r n , b u t t h i s s o r t o f v i c i o u s a t t a c k t s a l t o g e t h e r out o f lin e a n d h a s n o p l a c e -w h a te v e r tn A m e r i c a n p o l i t i c s - o r , p e r h a p s w e s h o u l d say it s h o u l d n o t h a v e a p l a c e . T h e r e a r e th o s e a m o n g th e m e r c h a n t s o f h a t e w h o o b v i o u s l y f e e l o t h e r w i s e . T h i s s o r t o t a t t a c k t s a l l to o c o m m o n in t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s . D u r i n g th e I 9 6 0 D e m o c r a t i c N a f t o n a l C o n v e n t i o n , w h e r e J o h n E , K e n n e d y w a s n o m i n a t e d fc>T the* P r e s i d e n c y , t h e f o r c e s b e h i n d c a n d i d a t e L y n d o n B , J o h n s o n s u g g e s t e d t h a t J F K was \dtseaseff and n o t fit t o b e P r e s i d e n t of the U n i t e d S t a t e s . ” In 1 9 6 4 , s i m i l a r m e r c h a n t s a t h a t e c a m e up w ith th e e q u a l l y r i d i c u l o u s s t o r y th a t S e n a t o r B a r r y G o l d - w a te r w a s to o e m o t i o n a l l y u n s t a b l e t o b e P r e s i d e n t . L o c a l l y , w e s e e th e s a m e flu n g h a p p e n i n g o n a s m a l l e r s c a l e w i t h d i s g u s t i n g f r e q u e n c y . W e w e r e r e c e n t l y to l d b y a f o r m e r c a n d i d a t e f o r p u b l i c o f f i c e th a t a s t o r y w a s o n c e c i r c u l a t e d a b o u t M m to Ih e e f f e c t th a t h e had s t o l e n m o n e y f r o m a c t v t c o r g a n i ­ z a t i o n ’s s p o r t s fu n d , a c o m p l e t e H e . M e r c h a n t s o f h a t e s e e m to b e e v e r y w h e r e . U s u a l l y , t h e i r f a b r i c a t i o n s an d lie s d o not s t a n d u p u n d e r t h e lig h t o f d a y , w h ic h w a s tb e f a t e o f th o s e a b o u t S e n a t o r M c G o v e r n a n d th e l a t e P r e s i d e n t E l s e n h o w e r . O t h e r s , h o w e v e r , a r e n o t s o e a s i l y d e f e a t e d . T h o s e to ld o n a s m a l l e r s c a l e in a w h i s p e r i n g c a m p a i g n a r e s o m e ­ tim e s n e v e r h e a r d b y t h e In d i v i d u a l w h o i s t h e t a r g e t , b u t t h e d a m a g e th e y d o to th e In d i v i d u a l s o m e t i m e s C a n n e v e r b e r e p a i r e d . F a v o r i t e a t t a c k s o f t h e m e r c r i a n t s o l h a t e , w h o a r e u n a b l e to c o m e up w t t h a n y t h i n g tr u e a b o u t th o s e th e y w i s h t o d e s t o r y , in c l u d e c o m p l e t e l y f a l s e t a l e s a b o u t t h e In d i v i d u a l ’s m e n t a l s t a b i l i t y , s e x Uf» a n d h o n e s t y . L ik e in trie c a s e o f G o l d w a t e r , w h e n i t w a s s u g g e s t e d t h a t h e w a s e m o t i o n a l l y u n f i t to b e P r e s i d e n t t h e s t i g m a r e m a i n e d w i t h h i m th r o u g h o u t the c a m p a i g n . R u m o r s n e v e r c o m ­ p l e t e l y c e a s e d a b o u t th e \ d i s e a s e d \ J o h n F , K e n n e d y . A n d how m a n y p u b l i c o f f i c i a l s o r f ig u r e t a h a v e b e e n d a m a g e d b e y o n d r e p a i r by l i e s a b o u t I l l i c i t s e x u a l a f f a i r s , p e r v e r s i o n s , e t c . ? T h e r e s h o u l d b e n o p l a c e In A m e r i c a n s o c i e t y f o r tb e m e r c h a n t s of hale*. T h e y a r e th e l o w e s t , m o s t v i l e c r e a t u r e s know n to d e c e n t m e n . W h e r e v e r t h e y a r e , they sh o u ld b e s e e n f o r w h a t t h e y a r e a n d e x p o s e d f o r w h a t th e y a r e . ' O u r c o u n t r y , o u r s t a t e an d o u r c o u n t y h a s e n o u g h p r o b l e m s a s tt I s , w ith o u t s u c h f i l t h p e d d l e r s _ - M i c h a e l J . B l a i r Room with a view At The Movies . . . Thl* week at the T o w n HnU T h e a t r e - F r i d a y th r o u g h M o n d a y , J u n e s o . J u l y 3 - “ T he C o w b o y s . * ’ J o h n W * y n e a n d f 1 y o u n g b o y s s t a r in “ The Cowboys,” w h i c h d e p i c t s a n a r d o u s 4 0 0 - m l l e c a t t l e d r i v e n c r o s e s o m e o f the r o u g h e s t c o u n t r y I n tb e W e s t . T h e f e a t u r e i s a Mark R y t f e l l f i l m In T e c h n i c o l o r a n d P a n a - v i e j o n f r o m a s c r e e n p l a y by Irving R a v e t c h a n d H a r r i e t F r a n k , M S W t l t t a m D a l e Je n n l n g r s . A moot d e l i g h t f u l M m , w i t h J o h n i t u r e a t n u n p m \ * * R* tr'd- s h o w e a c h n t g h t a t 1 p . m . , f e a - L i k e N o w by Terry Oakes — t # i f By winning the New York p ri­ mary, Senator George McGovern has increased mis delegate strength to about 1,300 of the 1,- 609 needed to be nominated at the Democratic Convention next month ln Miami Beach. This puts McGovern far ahead of second place Hubert Humphrey, who has 383 delegates; George Wallace with 371; and Muskle at 228. With only a handful of delegates re­ maining to be chosen, the big question now is' can George Mc­ Govern acquire 200 more votes and win nomination? Many political experts feel that it is too. late to stop the Senator from South Dakota. According to them, McGovern has the nomina­ tion sewed up and now must con­ centrate on the November election. On the other hand, there are those who say that McGovern can never be nominated by the Democratic Party. In their opin­ ion, the South Dakotan’s radical positions on great issues of the day would bring havoc to the party. The Democrats would be so deeply wounded and divided that they would go down to a defeat in November that would be catastrophic ln proportions, not unlike the Goldwater defeat in 1964. These same political observers point out that before the primary ta New York, Se­ nator McGovern had garnered only 30% of the total number of votes cast ta Democratic pri­ maries thts year. To them. It is highly Improbable that the Democratic Convention would nominate a man who would be so disasterous to the future of the party. If George McGovern should not receive the nomination next month, who will? There Is no answer to this complex question. But the possibilities are many and varied. It ts almost safe to assume that the convention ball will not enough to lead some people to believe that should McGovern be denied the party tittle, Ms back­ ers would turn to Kennedy who has always been their natural leader. And It would be presump­ tuous to exclude Wilbur Mills and Scoop Jackson from any pol­ itical forecasting. In the event of in extremely long, deadlocked convention, these two dark horses are very powerful and stand a good chance for nominations. Whatever the outdo me of the National Convention ta July, the Democratic nominee must unite tbe party if he ls to defeat Mr. Nixon ta November. Otherwise die Democrats will go down as Goldwater brought the Republi­ cans down ta ’64. Perhaps tf Mc­ Govern did lose ta November, It would put an end to the lib­ eral faction of the Democratic party. If s o , I hope George Mc­ Govern ls nominated by theDem- ocrats and then ls handily troun­ ced by President Nixon this fall. Dear Uncle Elmen Don’t you Uncle E lmer think that tf Senator Kennedy runs f o r Vice-President tt wtU help to bridge the generation gap? wtlfon Dear wutowNot necessarily, the Senator has tad difficulty b r i d g i n g In the past. UncleElmer Dear Uncle Elmer; My wife Is always buying new d resses, I lust can't believe how high some of the price* a re. Delbert Dear Delbert: I can’t believe bow high some of the hems are. Uncle Elmer D e a r U n c l e E l m e r ; W i l l 5 0 o u t s i d e t o i l e t s b e s u f f i c i e n t f o r th e r o c k f e s t i v a l ? D e a r T o n y : P r o b a b l y . N o d o u b t m a n y w i l l t a k e t h e i r o w n p o t . U n c l e E l m e r Dear UncleElmer; What Is your opinion of the SALT arms treaty? Ken Dear Kens Okay, I guess. I just hope we don’t get SALT and peppered, too. Uncle Elmer D e a r U n c l e E l m e r : W e l l , w i t h N e w Y o r k ’ s p r i m a r y t a h i s p o c ­ k e t , S e n a t o r M c G o v e r n t s j u s t a fe w s t e p s a w a y fro m t h e n o m i n a ­ tio n . O s l o w D e a r O s l o w ; T h a t ’s r i g h t , and w h e n h e g e t s i t h e w i l l b e a few s t e p s & o m d e f e a t tn N o v e m b e r . Dear Uncle Elmer; I am help­ ing the authorities prepare the necessary signs and posters for the rock festival. Cjm you offer any suggestions? W its on Dear Watson: Yes, 1 can. How about “ Keep OH The Grass” ? Uncle Elmer Q u o t a b l e Q u o t e s “ What’s the g o o d of a home If you are never In It?” Walter W e e d o n G r o s s m a n O n th e o u t s k i r t s o f R o m e , u n d e r th e w a r m , s u n n y s k i e s t h e r e ’s ,i r o o m w i t h a v i e w . As a mss.Her o t f a c t , th e r e a r e m a n y r o o m s , b u t t tl*- view 1S a n y t h i n g b u t b r i g h t . tn o n e o f th e ro o m s th e r e ’ s a £ 4 y e a r o l d g i r l fro m th e U n i t e d S t a t e s . S h e h a d b e e n In R o m e f o r t h r e e d a y s w h e n s h e w a s a r r e s t e d f o r p o s s e s s i o n o i d r u g s . S h e w a s n ’ t c a r r y i n g a n y t h i n g , b u t It w a s fo u n d b y the p o l i c e In an a p a r t m e n t s h e w a s v i s i t i n g . T h i s y o u n g w o m a n w t l l r a i l I n h e r c e l l s i x to t e n m o n t h s f o r t t t a l . I t ’s t h e la w . S h e d o e s n 't h a v e n c h a n c e f o r b a i l . T h e r e ts n o n e . N o o n e c a n c^-t J o t ou t. T h a t ’ s t h e la w , t o o . A n d tf s h e ’ s fo u n d g u i l t y sh e f a c e s a m in i m u m o l t h r e e y e a r s a n d a h e a v y fin e , fn th a t s a m e p r i s o n , th e r e a r e o t h e r U n i t e d S t a t e s c i t i z e n s , a r r e s t K l o n d r u g c h a r g e s , and the v iew I s t h e s a m e f o r th e m . In S p a i n , t h e r e ’ s a v e t e r a n : fro m M i c h i g a n a n d s s e c o n d g r a d e te a c h e r f r o m N e w Y o r k , b o t h s e r v i n g tim e . O v e r s e a s , y o u c a n a d d u p a to t a l o f m o r e ttaan 1 ,0 0 0 A m e r i c a n s w h o h a v e b e e n a r r e s t e d , t r i e d a n d fo u n d g u i l t y o n d r u g c h a r g e s . F o r s o m e o f th e m , I t w a s a c o l l i s i o n c o u r s e . H e r e , t n th e S t a l e s , th e y s m o k e d g r a s s , O t h e r s u s e d c h e m e i a l s . S t t l l o t h e r s w e r e ’e n g a g e d to tra f f i c k i n g . F o r s o m e , It w a s a d a r e ; s o m e t h i n g th e y h a d n ’ t c o n e b e f o r e . S c , w h y n o t ’ A n d , f o r t h e m o s t p a r i , m o s t o f th e m th o u g h t th a t j j i E u r o p e , t h e F a r E a s t o r s o u t h o f o u r b o r d e r , th e la w s w e r e t i ’l to u g h . O r e v e n If t h e y w e r e , th e e n f o r c e m e n t w a s n ’ t a s rig i d a s It I s h e r e . T h e y w e r e w r o n g . D r a g la w s o v e r s e a s a r e to u g h . A n d th e y ’r e e n f o r c e d . T o th e l e t t e r . Th i s t s b y n o m e a n s an in d i c t m e n t o f t h e i r J u d i c i a l s y s t e m . YVe c a n ' t , a n d s h o u l d n ’ t , e x p e c t th e m to b e th e s a m e a s th e y a r e t n t h i s c o u n t r y . Tf y o u ' r e t r a v e l i n g to a f o r e i g n c o u n t r y th i s s u m m e r , b e s u r e y o u know th e la w s o f t h a i c o u n t r y . U n d e r s t a n d t h e i r I n t e r ­ p r e t a t i o n a n d r i g h t s y o u h a v e a s s c i t i z e n o f th t s c o u n t r y , a n d how th o s e r i g h t s a p p l y o v e r s e a s . T o s e e E u r o p e a n d th e y i e r l u g e a n d h i s t o r y t h a t p r e c e d e d u s Is a r a r e a n d s p e c i a l o p p o r t u n i t y , t t s h o u l d n ’ t b e a b u s e d . A b o v e a l l , b e s u r e tria l y o u e n d u p In a ro o m w i t h th e r t g h t k i n d o f v i e w . ‘T f a m a n d i d n o t f e e l tik e b e c o m i n g a s o c i a l i s t a t t w e n t y , h e h a d n o h e a r t , a n d If h e d i d n o t t u r n I n t o a c o n s e r v a t i v e a t f o r t y , h e h a d n o m i n d . ” - G e o r g e B e r n a r d S h a w * T o r b o w h o f i g h t s a n d r u n s —w a y m s y l i v e to U g h * a n o t h e r d a y ; b u t h e w h o f s in b a t t l e s t a i n c a n n e v e r r i s e a n d fig h t a g a i n . ” - O l i v e r G o l d s m i t h “ A ll t h e w o r l d over,! w i l l back the masses against ihe c la sses.” - w i l l i a m E w a r t G l a d s t o n e “ W i s d o m d e n o t e s th e p u r s u i n g o f th e b e s t e n d s b y t h e b e s t m e a n s . ’ ’ - F r a n c i s H u t c h e s o n FKOM OUR E d i t o r , J o u r n a l a n d R e p u b l i c a n ; I w o u ld l i k e to s e t th e r e c o r d s t r a i g h t o n tw o p o i n t s tn R e v . S a l m a n ’s r e c e n t l e t t e r . W ith r e ­ s p e c t to p a r e n t a l p e r m i s s i o n f o r s t u d e n t s to v i e w th e movie ta q u e s t i o n , h e s t a t e s “ A s i t tu r n e d o u t , p a r e n t a l a p p r o v a l w a s r e ­ q u i r e d . . T h t s p e r m i s s i o n w a s tw i c e d e n i e d p a r e n t s ta th e d i s t r i c t b y B o a r d a c t i o n . A t th e v e r y l a s t m i n u t e th e B o a r d to o k a te l e p h o n e p o l l a n d r e v e r s e d i t s e l f . T h e r e w a s b a r e l y e n o u g h tim e to r e p r o d u c e f o r m s a n d g e t th e m In t o th e s t u d e n t s h a n d s th e d a y b e f o r e t h e s h o w i n g . T h i s I n d i c a t e s , I th i n k , t h a t b e c a u s e o l p r e s s u r e s , o r w h a t e v e r , th e B o a r d f e l t th e n e e d t o r e ­ e x a m i n e I t s p o s i t i o n . I t w a s n o t , a s R e v . S a l m o n s e e m s to im p l y , th a t if w a s a f o r e g o n e c o n c l u ­ s i o n a n d t a t h e w o r k s a l l a l o n g . T h e s e c o n d p o i n t 1 w o u l d l i k e fo c o r r e c t Is th a t r e g a r d l n g o b « 1 nalysis and Comment Journal atth JUpuMitwt i turn to Robert Humphrey. He represents too much of the past and has already lost once to Richard Nixon ta 1968. It Is equally sale tocount out George Wallace. Even If b is views were acceptable to the Democratic party, it is hard to imagine a man waging an effective Presidential campaign front a wheelchair. This brings us to Edmund Mus- kie. A deadlocked convention hall could very possibly see ta the Maine Senator a force for unity and settle on bim for the nom­ inee. Evidently, Muskle himself views this theory as a strong possibility because ta recent weeks he has revived his lagging campaign and even put in an appearance ta this state just be­ fore the primary. As ta any Presidential election year, one cannot overlook the pos­ sibility of • Kennedy candidacy. Senator Edward Kennedy has de­ clared Ms non-candidacy often “ Good evening, ladles and gentlemen. I’m Fred Fiapjaw tn Philadelphia, and Transcolonlal Broadcasting Co, now brings you ' Both Sides of the News, “ The nation, as you know, has been rocked by the a rrest of the brave young Britisher, MaJ. John Andre, who seemed to have had some plans to West Point in bis boot. There has been'a Second sensation tn the sudden departure from his post ol Gen. Benedict Arnold, commander of the West , Point garrison. “ We take you now to TBC cor­ respondent Hank Tudor at West Point. “ Thank you, F red. I have Gen. Washington here. Gen. Washing­ ton, what do you think of Gen. Arnold’s so-far unexplained —.” “ Why, that damned, gold- greedy, double-crossing, back- stabbing poltroon. . . ” “ Thank You, General. I’m a- frald that’s all the time we have. This is Hank Tudor turning you back to Fred Fiapjaw.” “ Thank You, Hank. We are fortunate to have three of our experts here ta the studio - Sam Stiletto, Everette Eyebrow and Dirk Smirk - to analyze Gen. Washington’s remarks. Ever­ ette?” “ I thought the use of the word ’damned’ on such a distinguished soldier as Gen. Arnold Indicated that Gen, Washington was over­ wrought. But, of course, the war — let’s say — has not been going well, eh, Sam?’’ “ Right, Ev. 1 mean these are dangerous times and cool heads are needed and ln the last cou­ ple of days - well, one shouldn’t use the term 'Irrational' con­ cerning Gen. Washington, but . 7 5 5 6 S T A T E S T R E E T , L O W V I L L E , N .Y . 13367 J o u r n a l E s t a b l i s h e d 1838 R e p u b l i c a n E s t a b l i s h e d laso M e r g e d 1860 Published weekly by the owners and publishers Lowvllle Printing and Publishing Co. Inc. Richard E. Smith, President - Publisher Michael J. Blair, Editor Carol Smith, Advertising Manager Carol Dykeman, Office Manager M E M B E R N a t i o n a l A d v e r t i s i n g R e p r e s e n t a t i v e INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER MARKETS, INC. N f f l ? A L PER New York - Chicago - Detroit - Dallas - San Francisco - Atlanta Entered at Post Office, Low ville, N.Y-.assacand-ClM* matt matter Association • Founded 1886 SUBSCRIPTION - PAYMENT IN APVANCE <80 00 Year New York State - $7.00 Year Elsawhsre Continental United states - $9.00 Year Alaska, Hawaii, Porslgn Countries W e d n e s d a y , J u n e 2 8 , 1 9 7 2 P a g e 2 :h: r*s.“zz r ~ -?” ™1* .r r & s 1 •“S S S r 5 r . V s r Ignore the truth . . . unless it Hts ineir w«*y . . • tew ua all ' we'll write win have to pa y . . . so we'U use the freedom . . . God meant for ua a u . . . we u write and say what's ta our hearts . . . though It will not plea*, a ll. ___________ _______ M i c h a e l J , B l a i r . . . A C L O S E R L O O K W e l l ; N e w Y o r k S t a t e ’s p r i ­ m a r y e l e c t i o n is n o w p a s t , a n d a s e x p e c t e d , o t t e r e d few s u r ­ p r i s e s lo c a l l y . S t a t e - w i d e , G e o r g e M c G o v e r n , a s e x p e c t e d , to o k t h e lio n ’s s h a r e o f t h e s t a t e ’ s D e m o c r a t i c c o n ­ v e n t i o n d e l e g a t e s , i n c l u d i n g t h o s e f r o m th e 3 0 t h C o n g r e s s i o n a l D i s ­ t r i c t , o f w h i c h L e w t s C o u n t y l s p a r t . - course, being the effort given the campaign by the McGovern peopte. But most responsible, however, was apathy, a most unhealthy situation, and particul­ arly so during a Presidential election year. “ Thank you, Sam, Everette and Dirk. And now we take you to Ronald Redcoat at British head­ quarters ta New York, where he has an exclusive Interview set up with Gen. Arnold. Ronald?” “ Thanks, Fred. Gen. Arnold, what do you have to say for yourself?” “ Well, I . . . ah . . . ” * “ Are you saying that you are tired of the slaughter of Ameri­ can boys and took this action in an effort to return them quickly to their loved ones?” “ Yeah, that’s It.” “ Am I correct that yon take the position that instead ol flee­ ing for your life you were really riding tor pence?” “ You got it, boy, you got UP’ “ This Is Ron Redcoat ta New York returning you to Fred Fiap­ jaw.” “ We have here ta our studio Peter Pigeon, the distinguished attorney, who has some grave doubts about the treatment of the handsome and talented young Bri­ tish officer, Maj. Andre. Mr. Pigeon?” “ Justice-loving Americans axe hanging their heads ta shame, Fred, a t the spectacle of a fine youth being stopped on the high road by a group of guerrillas out of uniform. He was searched, without a warrant, questioned without his attorney present, im­ prisoned without habeas corpus and condemned to death without a jury. We are demanding that Maj. Andre and the papers sto­ len from him be sent on imme­ diately to Sir. Henry Clinton ta New York, together with an in­ demnity of 10,000 sovereigns ta gold.” “ Thank you, Peter Pigeon. And now for our final Item we go to Windsor Hanover on the campus of Harvard University. Take it, Win.” M o s t g r a t i f y i n g t o th i s r e p o r t e r w a s , o f c o u r s e , th e o v e r w h e l m i n g m a r g i n o f v i c t o r y L e w i s C o u n t y R e p u b l i c a n v o t e r s g a v e to I n c u m ­ b e n t C o n g r e s s m a n R o b e r t C , M c - ; E w e n , w h o a t th i s w r i t i n g s e e m s \ t o h a v e tro u n c e d h i s o p p o n e n t , 'E m e r s o n v . L a u g h l a n d , W a t e r ­ to w n , b y a r a t i o o f o v e r 6 fo I u th e in t h e c o u n t y . It w a s a v o t e o f c o n f i d e n c e to a m a n w h o h a s r e ­ p r e s e n t e d h i s p e o p l e w e l l , a n d a t th e s a m e t i m e a s o u n d re p u d i a ­ tio n o f r a d i c a l l e f t - w i n g e l e m e n t s w h i c h w e r e t r y i n g to s n a r e th e C o n g r e s s i o n a l s e a t . M r . L a u g h ­ la n d l s n o w ta l k i n g o f ru n n i n g a s a n in d e p e n d e n t , b u t h e s h o u l d s a v e h i s t i m e , e n e r g y a n d m o n e y . - •- - - - - s a p . . T h e r e p o d f a t i o n m r p o u e i a a a * r - s u t e n w o t t reo f f l V d d l f t f d j d p r i ­ m a r y a r e a goodood I n d i c a t i o n o f m a r y a r e a g th e d e f e a t h e c o u l d e x p e c t a s a n In d e p e n d e n t t a N o v e m b e r . It was interesting to note that Lewis County’s Democratic vo­ ters greeted Mr. McGovern’s candidacy with something far, far short of enthusiasm. , Even taking Into account the minuscule turnout at the polls by the Democratic voters, Mc­ Govern’s forces were able to garner only about 57 per cent of the vote ta Lewis County, which at this writing appears to b e the worst showing ta the 30th Con­ gressional District for the Mc­ Govern delegates. The uncom­ mitted slate, which was at one time pledged to Senator Edmund Muskle of Maine, without any campaign whatsoever was able to come up with about 43 per cent of the vote, which, as I said previously, leaves me with the opinion that Lewis County Democrats are not enthusiastic abodt ’ McGovern and have pre­ ferences elsewhere among the Democratic hopefuls. A t t h e s a m e t i m e , t t w a s r a t h e r s a d t o fin d t h a t s o fe w o f b o t h o u r R e p u b l i c a n a n d D e m o c r a t i c v o t e r s t u r n e d o u t a t th e p o l l s . N e i t h e r th e R e p u b l i c a n s n o r th e D e m o c r a t i c p r i m a r i e s s e e m e d to h a v e i n t e r e s t e d a n o v e r w h e l m i n g m a j o r i t y o f th e p e o p l e . S o m e o f t h i s , o f c o u r s e , w a s d u e to a v e r y n o t i c e a b l e la c k o f c a m p a l g n t a g b y b o t h th e R e p u b l i c a n s a n d th e D e m o c r a t s , th e e x c e p t i o n , o f A le s s o n s e e m e d to b e le a r n e d a f th e p r i m a r y p o l l s , th a t b e i n g o u r s t a t e ’s c o m p l e t e p r e s i d e n t i a l p r i m a r y s y s t e m n e e d s a d r a s t i c o v e r h a u l i n g . T o b e g i n w i t h . It t s c l e a r l y e v i d e n t th a t If t h e s t a t e t s t a h a v e a p r e s i d e n t i a l p r i m a r y , I t s h o u l d b e a h e a d t o h e a d c o n ­ t e s t b e t w e e n t h e c o n t e n d e r s f o r t h e n o m i n a t i o n a n d n o t a c o n t e s t b e t w e e n d e l e g a t e s , m o s t o f w h o m a r e c o m p l e t e l y u n k n o w n b y m o s t - o f th e v o t e r s w h o g o t o th e p o l l s . In addition, many ballots were voided due to the fact that the voters found them confusing an; Improperly voted. One local pol. tteal pundit, tongue tn cheek I trust, said that the McGoven slate did well because a maabj the name of Mannlx led ihe slate; a name well known to all T7 viewers. If this is the case, and I most certainly hope it’s not, then I must speculate on how well the other slate of delegates woull have done If the leading aim had been filled by a man namet Welby o r Ironside. In any c a s e , tt la clearly ex. dent that u n less the primary am tem inNew YorkS tate i s designs to confuse the average voter, the some drastic changes need tot* made. Senator McGovern has al« criticized our archaic prlmir setup and on this subject I Con! hardly agree with him mon I also found it disappointing her few voters under 21 years o f ij took advantage of the ballot bo to exercise their views on prl mary day. In one LowvUle dU trict, only one voter nodoe tt age of ai votad b either toe B; publican o r Democratic primal les. I am told the same iltoati: existed throughout Lewis Coumti It was a time when many o f tt young vocal apostles of chan; could have dime something cot struct!ve to help achieve then goals, but instead, they sad! passed the opportunity by. I trust and hope that they wtl one day learn, along with some; thetr parents who also failed t appear at the polls, that the vot is a far mere effective instrumen of democracy ta our country thai the gripe. “ Right o n . F r e d . W e l l , folks, w e ’ r e in lu c k . J u s t a s o u r c a m - je c t i v l t y t n t h e S o u t h L e w i s d r u g p r o g r a m . R e v - S a l m o n s e e m s t a th i n k th a t t h e p r o g r a m h e r e c o n ­ s i s t s o f h a v i n g p o l i c e m e n t a s e v ­ e r a l t i m e s a y e a r t o e x p o u n d t h e i r v i e w s . T h e g o o d l a t h e r h e r e d i d n o ! d o M s h o m e w o r k . T h e r e a r e m a n y f i l m s , s o u n d f i l m s t r i p s a n d te x t f i l m s t r i p s t h a t a r e u s e d th r o u g h o u t t h * y e a r b y t e a ­ c h e r s to th e d i s t r i c t w h i c h p r e ­ s e n t s e v e r a l d i i l e r i n g v i e w p o i n t s c o n c e r n i n g lh e d r u g p r o b l e m . T h e p o l i c e p r e s e n t a t i o n Is o n l y o n e s m a l l p a r t of t h e e n t l r e p r o g r a m . It t s t r u e t h a t w e d o n o t h i r e d r u g a d d i c t s to p r e s e n t t h e i r p i t c h . B u i w e d o a t t e m p t t o p r e ­ s e n t m a n y v i e w p o i n t s . W h i c h a l s o p o i n t s o u t t h a t ta a n y c o n t r o v e r ­ s i a l s u b j e c t t h e r e a r e u s u a l l y m a n y p o i n t s o f v i e w , n o t o n e o r tw o a n d th a t g o o d e d u c a t i o n m a n ­ d a t e s th a t a s m a n y s i d e s a s p o s ­ s i b l e b e p r e s e n t e d . - S i n c e r e l y , L o u t s M l h a l y l . e r a c r e w r e a c h e d t h e c a m p u s w e h a p p e n e d o n a jo i n t d e r n o n — s t r a t l o n o f th e C h r i s t i a n ? C o n ­ c e r n e d A b o u t C o n s c r i p t i o n S o ­ c i e t y , th e H e l l N o W e W o n ’ t G o C l u b a n d t h e F r e e d o m f o r W h a t A s s o c i a t i o n . T h e y h a v e ju s t b u r n t M a s s a c h u s e t t s H a U . “ W e c a n ’ t t u r n th e c a m e r a on m a n y o f t h e s i g n s , b u t I c a n r e a d y o u s o m e - 'G e o r g e t h e H a t c h e t M a n ,* ‘W a s h i n g t o n , the S n e a k o f T r e n t o n , ' D o w n W ith th e B u t ­ c h e r o f W h i t e P l a i n s , ’ ’O u t l th e V i r g i n i a A r i s t o c r a t . ’ T h e c r o w d h a s t o n s u p » n u m b e r o f s t r i p e d f l a g s a n d I s c h a n t i n g ‘ F r e e J o h n A n d r e * a n d ‘ Y e a , A r n o l d ! ’ “ W e l l , l a d l e s a n d g e n t i e m e D , l i k e th e m o r n o t h e r e ’s Y o u n g A m e r i c a o n t h e m a r c h . B a c k lo y o u , F r e d F i a p j a w , ” “ T h a n k y o u , W i n d s o r H a n o v e r . F o l k s , o u r tim e Is u p . 1 Ju s t w a n t t a le a v e y o u w i t h o n e th o u g h t. H e w h o i g n o r e s t h e d e m a n d s o f y o u t h i s o u t o f to u c h w i t h th e f u t u r e o f A m e r i c a , T h i s Is F r e d F i a p j a w s a y i n g g o o d n i g h t f o r B o t h S i d e s o f th e N e w s . ” - J e n ­ k i n s L l o y d J o n e s , T h e W a s h i n g ­ to n S t a r E d i t o r ’s N o t e : T h e a b o v e a r ­ t i c l e , “ T a i l o r e d T h e N e w s T o F i t V i e w s , ” f r o m T h e W a s h i n g ­ to n S t a r w a s I n s e r t e d In th e C o n g r e s s i o n a l R e c o r d b y S e n , H u g h S c o t t , R . , P a . , U . S . S e n a t e M i n o r i t y L e a d e r . T h e p o p u l a t i o n e x p l o s i o n t s a f a l l a c y c r e a t e d b y a s o c i e t y u n ­ w i l l i n g to f a c e u p to I t s s o c i a l r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s , a u t h o r a n d r a d i o a n d te l e v i s i o n p e r s o n a l i t y M a l c o l m M u g g e r i d g e f o l d a m e e t ­ in g o r g a n i z e d b y P r o F i d e o f S c o t l a n d , “ The contem p o rary su p e r­ stition on which future h isto r ian s w ill fasten with most glee and contumely, I feel sure, is the so- called population explosion.” This notion, he said, has ta a short space of tim e been widely accepted as sacrosanct. “ It ls simply not true that our earth ts overcrowded: as o f now or In the measureable future. On the contrary, the problem of over-production is a much more pressing one.” Muggeridge said that tbe whole population of tbe world could, with some discomfort, stand Up on the Isle of W right, which has an area of 147 square m iles. The world population Is about 3.7 billion. “ Nor is It true that world pro­ duction of food snd other nec­ essities Is falling behind popu- atlon growth. On the contrary, the problem Is one of overpro­ duction and distribution.” Commenting on contracep­ tives, Muggeridge said: “ The depraved bourgeoisie of the West export, along with the pill, their own depravity to thetr tike ln the East, producing the same consequences there In the shame of promiscuity and atten­ dant tils as at borne. It would seem clear that In this matter Christians face one of the great crises - perhaps the greatest In all their history.” The population explosion, he said, Is the creation of a parti­ cular group of people who have given It such credulity that ft ts treated almost religiously. E a rlie r, Muggeridge adtitres- ed tbe congregation of St. Thomas Anglican church, Edin­ burgh. He said that because men are trying ta live without God today the affluent technocracies are “ being swept along by two disastrous currents of megalo­ mania and erotomania.” Muggerldge’s lecture at St. Thomas’ was one o f a series he- tag presented at the church under the title of “ The Christian Answer.” “ Erotom ania,” Muggeridge said, “ hangs Uke a particularly obnoxious form ofsmogover pub­ lic entertainment, arts and let— tors, especially over what we call C H A T T IN G WITH AUNT ABIGAIL Tim es ain’t what they used ta be. I bpen a hearin a lot lately about that ther rock festival. 1 don’t rightly know jest what it t- all about end !’,* little con­ fused as to what it is at. When* I see the word rock I’s think about a stone on the beach or a nice big stone ta the meadow. You know, one of those nice rocks for stitta and thtakto. So, any­ ways, my next door neighbor Susan came over and explained everythin fo m e. She done told me that rock means the kind of popular music that some of these' young wblppersnappers play. She done brought me some records over so’s I could hear what tt was like. When I done listened to It, my ol foot started tapping and my heart started the pal­ p i t a t i o n s . 1 t a l k e d t o U n c l e E lrnei l a t e r a n h e a n m e d e c i d e d w w a s a g o t o t o c h e c k t h i s t e n r o c k f e s t i v a l o u t . H e d e c i d e d to d r i v e . V.V-’ s g o n n a - c a r sc® ’ s l o p p y o l c l o t h e s — U n c l e E lm e r t s w e a r t a b i s p e i n t t a d u d s and I’s a w e a r t a m y o u t d o o r w o rld! c l o l f c e s , W e ’s t a t i n o u r ow n food a n d d r i n k t a m y J u g c u z w e d o n '1 w a n t n o t h i n p u t t a o u r drinks I’m a l l e x c i t e d a b o u t s e e i n til th o s e h i p p i e s 1a erne p l a c e . I'l a l i t t l e s h e a r e d h o t I t ’l l pass. W e 's a ta k f n th e la w n c h a i n c u x o n c e I g t t d o w n It’s h a r d k g i t u p a n y m o r e , I fig u r e d tin w i t h a l l t h e s e s u p p l i e s a n o c l o t h e s a n m y “ g r a n n y ' g l a s s e s w e s h o u l d - f i t ta re* n i c e . Y o u r n e v e r to old! t h e n . . , A t P r a y e r T h e f e a r o f t h e L o r d ta th e b e g i n n i n g o f w i s d o m ; * gooff ut s t a n d i n g h a v e a l l th e y th a t d o t h e r e a f t e r ; th e p r a i s e o f tt e n d ' f o r e v e r , — T h e B o o k o f C o m m o n P r a y e r the media, the whole communica­ tions industry. Not even the Corinthians, about whom the Apostle Paul wrdfe so bluntly were as obsessoff by the ProUc as is our'soclety today,” Megalomania Isbptogpromotod by credulous scientific minds that; s e r i o u s l y e n t e r t a i n th e p o s ­ s i b i l i t y t h a t m a n c a n p e r f e c t h i * o w n s e l f a n d h i s I n s t i t u t i o n s , M u g g e ridge* c o n t i n u e d . “ F r o m s u c h e s s a y s t a t h e c r e - a t i o n o f h e a v e n o n e a r t h w e c a n o n l y c r y o u t t o b e d e l i v e r e d , in a n y c a s e , a s i s a l r e a d y a b u n ­ d a n t l y c l e a r , th e y c o n t a i n w i t h i n th e m s e l v e s t h e s e e d s o f t h e i r a w n d e s t r u c t i o n s . T h e d e l i b e r a t e e x c l u s i o n o f a n y s e n s e o f a m o r a l o r d e r m e a n s th a t - u l t i m a t e l y n o o r d e r a t a l l - p o l i t i c a l , e c o n o m i c , s o c i a l o r an y o t h e r - w i l l b e a t t a i n a b l e . “ I n d e e d , o r d e r ta a l r e a d y b r e a s t i n g d o w n e v e r y w h e r e . T h e r o a d to th e n e x t D a r k A g e s m a y w e l l p r o v e tn h e a m o t o r w a y with many lanes, finely metalled b rilliantly 111 and overfJowlu with enlightened hopes and sen ttm ents.\ From the complexities tha confront ua, he arid, one simp'1 point emerges: men a r e trjrtw to conduct their affairs wtthou any reference to God o r to eter n l t y . The world today, he said, pr* sent* a spectacle of bre*Mto*t confusion and despair. This I all more oppressive, he added because we can look at what l happening on our televlslo screens - ’•instant doomsday on a tiny screen ln our slttin rooms.

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